Weird days in vintage Fender tube amp pricing

Discussion in 'Glowing Bottle Tube Amp Forum' started by theprofessor, May 13, 2019.

  1. Larmo63

    Larmo63 Tele-Afflicted

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    My cousin has a really cool '67 Tele that is going UP in value and a '64 BF Twin Reverb that is seemingly going DOWN in value.

    He's getting older and he always talks about how "that amp is going to be my retirement."

    Good luck.
     
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  2. AJ Love

    AJ Love Friend of Leo's

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    It is interesting, and I don't know that the trend will change anytime. I love old amps, whether it is a Twin or a Champ or something in between...
     
  3. WireLine

    WireLine Tele-Afflicted

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    I’ve been trying to sell a completely rebuilt 71 Twin for 6 months...lots of people want it, but no one wants to foot the shipping costs...

    This particular TR is one of the finest I’ve heard in 40 yrs, but I simply cannot lug it anywhere. So yeah, it’s a weird time in amp selling.
     
  4. chezdeluxe

    chezdeluxe Poster Extraordinaire

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    I can do you a good deal on my 63 4x10 Brown Concert but you will have to come over and collect it. :cool:
     
  5. galaxiex

    galaxiex Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Good cranked "Big Amp" tone at low(er) volume...

    How do YOU get that?

    I'm still searching....

    My biggest, best sounding amp is a 78 SFDR at "only" 22 watts, it's still too loud when it's in it's sweet spot.

    Even my much modded, hand wired Blues Junior at ~15 watts is too much...

    10 years ago I badly wanted a SFTR... never got one, and even with low prices now, I'm not sure I want one anymore...

    .
     
  6. dkmw

    dkmw Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I've got two old amps sitting next to me as I write this. One is a 73 Twin I bought new for about $350 (I don't remember exact price). A few months after I got the Twin, I realized I needed a smaller amp so the police wouldn't get called every time I played at home. I got an old Supro 1606 for $25 - or more accurately I traded $25 worth of a common commodity for it.

    Today, the little 5-watt Supro is worth about $500, likely more than I could get for the Twin:confused::rolleyes:o_O
     
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  7. Dacious

    Dacious Poster Extraordinaire

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    I've downsized from a Vibrolux Reverb I had trouble shifting - remember when they were a holy grail just-so Goldilocks amp?

    I've just downsized again to a 83 Superchamp. It combines BF Princeton circuit with tube reverb, cathodyne phase inverter, built in overdrive that uses the reverb driver plus lots of rectifier filtering and a DR output and massive va/power trans to produce stunning output levels for a vintage Champ-sized sub 30lb amp. Combined with a quality efficient speaker it's got amazing grunt.

    Last gig it was still too loud! My bandmate with his HRDx 40 112 was complaining about headroom.

    I couldn't see going back to my old Pro Reverb or Vibrolux - just lugging them and transportation was a pain. My 20 watt Mini Jubilee is too loud for half the gigs we do.

    I'd love a big amp for jamspace but I can't afford the attention for stuff I don't play let alone $$$.
     
  8. ifallalot

    ifallalot Tele-Afflicted

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    :p

    That might get kinda expensive
     
  9. tfarny

    tfarny Friend of Leo's

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    The price is meeting the demand, nothing weird about it. I could probably get a SF Twin for $600 in my area, and I know I could get an AC30 for that price as well. My Blues Cube Stage weighs 30lb and I just can't foresee needing a louder amp than that for anything I might do. I might want a different amp for some situations, and I am looking around at a couple interesting 112 and 210 combos, but I have zero need for something louder.
     
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  10. Keefsdad

    Keefsdad Tele-Meister

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    It may have something to do with demographics, guys that starting playing in the late 60's, like me, are getting to old to haul heavy amps around that they can't turn up anyway. Most of the time I don't miss the sound much either, a 15 watt amp with the tubes cooking sounds damn good to me, and loud enough for most clubs anyway.
     
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  11. jvin248

    jvin248 Poster Extraordinaire

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    .

    Older players who love the big iron just don't want to carry it any more.
    Someone will figure out how to chop those big amps down into easy carry pieces and there will be a little surge of renewed interest and sales.

    As for the modelers ... the first company that figures out how to make the user interface easy and simple will clean up. That's always a problem, having three knobs and a hundred levels deep of menus or a hundred knobs and no menus -- but someone getting clever with this will make a winner and kill off both the big iron amps and the current range of complex modelers.

    This is the reason the successfully enduring guitar styles don't have a hundred pots and switches, the famous ones have simple controls that have remained for decades: Strat, LP, or Tele.

    .
     
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  12. ElJay370

    ElJay370 Tele-Meister

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    Big amps going out of style???

    [​IMG]

    You guys obviously don't hang out in stoner/doom/sludge metal circles. :twisted:

    Loud amps save lives....
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2019
  13. tfarny

    tfarny Friend of Leo's

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    I agree about the modelers - one of the reasons I like the Yamaha THR10C so much is that I can just set it to "Deluxe" and the knobs all do what they're supposed to and it sounds great clean, cranked, effected, whatever. There are only 5 or 6 amp options and I've barely used any of the others. Same with my Blues Cube - all the knobs work like they should and it sounds good.
     
  14. Milspec

    Milspec Friend of Leo's

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    I actually see the high powered amps making a big comeback at some point. I used to be into restoring muscle cars and driving them as daily drivers. At work was a band of youngsters who spent a fortune on Subaru turbo cars and brag all day about their performance. One day I parked next to their little club corner of the parking lot in a '67 Buick GS with a 455 and glasspacks. At the end of the day, they wound theirs up and I fired mine. Theirs whined and whistled while mine sounded like a tractor pull was about to happen...and left about 10 feet of rubber on the parking lot. The next day I heard the Subaru gang talking in the break room and they were all upset that so many people were commenting on the old Buick and not on their twin turbo creations with glow lights and trunk wings. Truth is, they could probably leave me in the dust with their modern cars, but it didn't inspire people like the rumble of that 455.

    I have many small 6w gems and a few high powered amps (Twin, Showman, etc.) and you can get some great tones out of the lower powered amps, but there is something about that "crack" you hear when you hit the strings through a Twin or such amp. The sound might be at a low level, but it jumps out of the amp when you hit the strings. I don't think that can ever be replaced...you feel that kind of music, not just hear it.

    It all moves in cycles, I actually heard a kid next to me at the stoplight in a plumbing van listening to "Electric Avenue" by Eddie Grant and I thought damn, I was a kid when that song was a hit and he couldn't have been older than 22, yet he was cranking it. It is all cycles.
     
  15. Ian T

    Ian T Tele-Holic

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    I just went through a YouTube kick of listening to all the early Van Halen I could find.

    If you check out the tones they were getting in arenas in the late 70's and compare them to what we have today, it's definitely gone downhill.

    In the late 70's and early 80's, it was all analog gear, which is probably a factor. The PAs had achieved the power to fill arenas. No Class D - heavy iron. Stage volume was still high as they wanted. Eddie was playing through a cranked Plexi stack. No IEMs. No domineering soundmen enforcing volume limits. No digital compression/reverb/delay on the digital board. Each person's sound was amazing. Eddie's Brown sound was there, night after night.

    Now? Eddie plays a high gain 5150 at low volume that sounds like a line 6 POD.

    Bands in the 70's played with multiple stacks, daisy chained. The feeling of playing guitar on the stage with all that air moving behind them had to have been phenomenal.

    Now it's little amps, off stage, mic'd with the PA doing all the work and the sound man taking liberties with EQ, effects, etc.

    Guitarists were playing loud amps, daisy chained and dimed.

    Now it's all about pedals and modelers to emulate that sound at low volume, or direct. But the air is not moving. It's just not the same. Eventually people will realize what has been lost.

    I do feel that there will be a backlash at some point. People will want music with no click tracks, no IEM with "sweetener" backing tracks, no perfection - people will want real, live, music, risk taking, and human imperfection once again.

    Until then, low stage volume and low testosterone will dictate small amps.
     
  16. Les H

    Les H Tele-Meister

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    I have a twin reverb reissue. I installed casters and pull 2 power tubes so now it's around 40 watts. Yeah it's heavy but with the casters it's very manageable and honestly is easier to man handle than our PA equipment. That's the gear I dread setting up.
     
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  17. Mojo Brown

    Mojo Brown TDPRI Member

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    I think this is rather subjective.

    For the last 20ish years I have A/B'd a Super Reverb and Dual Rectifier on quite a few tours and countless studio work. I don't see this setup ever changing while I'm doing professional work.

    What I think even more so is that we live in a digital world now where at the touch of a button the world is yours. This has lead to a huge rise in guitar players and moreover, internet guitarist(I'm not sure what to call these types, I'm new to the online stuff. But the guys who spend more time online looking and talking guitar vs actually playing them.)

    When I started playing guitar, there just weren't as many people that could play. Nowadays it seems everyone owns a guitar and can play a song or two. The world is full of bar chord heroes.

    That means the scales have tipped and now there is an insane amount of beginning and amateur players out there(most of which are buying gear outside their level of playing). These players don't need 60-100 watts of power and typically don't know how to handle an amp of that stature anyways. But what happens is they see someone like Clapton playing through one of these amps and say, I need it! They don't. Just like they don't need the 6 guitars they bought when they don't even know the major scale past 1st position.

    Now if you're out there playing Bob's bar and Paul's Pub, that little 25-35 watter will do you just fine. I'd say for most, that's all they will ever need.

    Just like for most, 1 decent $5-700
    Guitar will be more guitar than they ever need. But they still buy more and thats why you can find a Custom Shop in any music store now.

    And if you think a little modeling amp running through a PA can compare to something like say a fender Super six...then I think you've not played enough to know the difference.
     
  18. Milspec

    Milspec Friend of Leo's

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    applause0216.jpg
     
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  19. mgreene

    mgreene Tele-Holic

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    Yes exactly - larger amps have been hard to sell for sometime. I put a couple of desirable amps up for sale about 6 or 7 years ago - including a Holland Gibb Droll (bassman 4X10 style) and received exactly one real inquiry.

    I am thinking about taking it to a local shop for consignment and just taking whatever.
     
  20. Fiesta Red

    Fiesta Red Friend of Leo's

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    My amp of choice is a ‘63-reissue Vibroverb; 35 or 40 watts (depending on what you read) of glorious punchy 2x10” Fender tube tone. Equally good for harp and guitar. Reasonable size and weight.

    Loud enough for dang near any venue (unmic’d), but small/quiet enough for almost any venue as well.

    ...and by today’s standards, it’s “too big.”

    Ridiculous.

    I don’t think there’s too many venues where you can drag in a Marshall stack (or half-stack, even)—which was not uncommon when I first started playing in the late 80’s—but I think there’s still venues where a Super Reverb or a Twin Reverb is acceptable; the player(s) just have to be smart and judicious with their volume.

    PS The only other amp that I liked as much as my Vibroverb was a 197_ silverface/master volume Bassman Ten...that 4x10” was the most glorious amp I ever owned. The only reason(s) I sold it (outside of financial necessity) were the weight and the lack of tremolo/vibrato/whatever...that master volume made it possible to get it cranked as much as possible but not kill everyone sitting in the front row...which leads me to ask:

    Why aren’t there more master volume amps out being made out there?
     
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