We need rescuing since our neighbor got a new dog : update.

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Mike Eskimo, Jun 14, 2019.

  1. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Our neighbor got rid of the dog.

    Seems our experience as a neighbor to the dog wasn’t even as bad as her experience as the owner of the dog.

    It was barking the entire time she was gone because she had to crate it. The entire day. While her other silent dog just walked around the house freely.

    The new hound/beagle mix would chew up everything in sight. I also noticed that they had to use a garbage can lid and a broom to get him back in the house . Like a sword fight with your dog just to get him to obey.

    She had a long conversation over the fence with my wife and burst into tears and just was at her wits end .

    This is the second time the dog has been returned someplace so now it goes to some big “rescue farm” – she actually said that to my wife. But since she has more PETA stickers than anyone I’ve ever met I don’t doubt it.

    Ahhhhh...the neighborhood’s quiet again...
     
  2. philosofriend

    philosofriend Tele-Holic

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    Dogs have only two ways to relate to people: either the human is in charge, or the dog is in charge. There is no such thing as loving equal reasonable friends in a dog's mind.
    Kind of brutal, but the dog has to be humbled or the dog has got to go.
     
  3. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Before moving to the mountains many moons ago, my mountain man brother in law and his wife lived on a small farm, kind of a ranchette they had managed to scrape together the money to buy. There was a small property next door he could have bought for seventy five hundred bucks, I tried to get him to buy it, he just wouldn't hear of spending the money.

    Fast forward a couple of years, some people bought the place, and moved in and got a dog, then they got a dog, then they got a dog without exaggeration about fifty times more! My brother in law happened to work with the guy. One day, after more than a year of being aggravated by this amateur dog pound owner, they were at work, and the guy began to prod my brother in law in front of his boss and the bosses son about the dogs. Bad move, before he knew it, Mr. Dog Pound opened up the worst can of whip a$$ he'd ever stumbled upon in his life.

    The boss was pretty cool, when the guy wanted my brother in law fired, he refused and said, you knew he had a temper you should have left him be. Fate works in mysterious ways, after that, his wife started looking for a place in the mountains, she found one at an incredible deal, sold the ranchette for enough to cover the new place, and enough left over to make the move, and have a little nest egg left over. They spent fourteen wonderful years up there together, before she passed. My BIL is still there and will be until he dies.
     
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  4. imwjl

    imwjl Poster Extraordinaire

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    Yes, but it's important to say that doesn't mean the human pack leader needs to be or should be brutal. Our last dog was truly an alpha male but establishing who's boss was straight forward. Our current dog is a girl version of 1960s Rolling Stones and would be a rescue dog with someone else but she knows who's boss and is overall good.

    There's a lot of good content out there on how you establish who's boss. One challenging part for the humans is many dog owners don't honestly give their pets enough time and work. If the dog is not a tiny house dog and has work dog genes or prey instinct you have to spend a lot of time working the dog.

    Good luck to the everyone.
     
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  5. jimd

    jimd Friend of Leo's

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    When I was a kid we were visiting family and talking about our new dog and how picky an eater he was. My very old school/old country great uncle replied, "you give him to me for a week and he will eat onions." We didn't give him the dog.
     
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  6. 68tele

    68tele Friend of Leo's

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    Crating the dog all day = Torturous abuse for said dog. Get a stuffed toy instead.
     
  7. ce24

    ce24 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Establishing alpha dominance isn't that hard....I did it for 35 years teaching high school! Lol.
     
  8. Preacher

    Preacher Friend of Leo's

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    I love dogs. I really do. When I was growing up we lived in the country and farmed, ranched and hunted. We had cattle dogs and hunting dogs and if someone dropped a dog off on our dirt road it either figured out how to hunt or round up cattle or it would not be cared for and eventually disappeared (I will leave that to your imaginations).

    But I do not have a dog, nor have I had a dog in the last 30 years. Why? Because I travel, I work, and I have always felt that taking care of a dog was more responsibility than I needed (I had four kids who used all of my free time). So I never got a dog because I knew my own limitations.

    Now that I am older, don't travel as much and have a place that would support having a dog that I would like (Lab or Retriever) I may find myself a dog owner in the future.

    I have seen people who just "had to have" a dog and I would look at them and wonder why. They never had time to train the dog, the dog was always in its crate because they had no yard or the dog was not trained and could not be trusted around strangers. It always befuddled me why they put themselves in the same situation over and over again.
     
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  9. getbent

    getbent Telefied Ad Free Member

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    One of our dogs was returned to the pound 5 times before we got her. She was a disaster. She was super hyper (and still is) and needs LOTS of activity, exercise and TRAINING. A long time ago, my ex wife brought home a beagle that was going to be destroyed.... We were only a temporary shelter for the dog... we had him 3 months. The first few days were interesting with the constant vocalizing and just 'busy ness' that he had. We did get it worked out, but my ex wife TOTALLY regretted it as it disrupted the other dogs we had, we had little kids and I had work (two jobs at the time) and I was remodeling the house... so, it was a HUGE commitment to take on that dog in a moment of 'oh, somebody should help him' when it would not be her who had to work with him... The new owners got a pretty good dog... but beagles and hunting hounds should go where they get to be THEM and not some suburban dweller in a crate. For this girl, she is the most grateful, loving and sweet dog (now) and about the happiest little being on the planet.... The whole 'one rules the roost' thing is true, animals, people etc mostly like structure and consistency and habit and protocols... what is praised and what is to be avoided... glad for the dog that he gets another shot in another environment. It is a lesson that simply wanting a good outcome is not an indication that we'll get one... it takes a hand in the dirt and work and dedication and 'want to' along with skills and determination...
    IMG_9190.jpeg
     
  10. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's

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    Lovely Dog !
     
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  11. Teleguy61

    Teleguy61 Friend of Leo's

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    Well said @getbent--hunting dogs are hunting dogs. They do not respond well to an inactive, cooped-up lifestyle. They need lots and lots of exercise, and if they don't get it, they will let you know. Usually loudly.
    And @68tele, crating a dog is not torture, if done correctly. Crate must be large enough for the dog to turn around, and it must see the crate as a sanctuary, a home. Again, plenty of exercise is the clue.
    We had big dogs, lab/shepherd cross and Dobermans, and they were crated during the day. Last Dobie was 95 pounds, and he was fine in the crate.
    But he got lots of exercise, and plenty of structure. The crate was part of the structure.
    He was better crated than loose in the house.
     
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  12. jhundt

    jhundt Doctor of Teleocity

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    we took over a little curly black dog that had been rescued and rejected 4 or 5 times. The last rejector was my mother, and if you knew my mom you would know how out-of-character that was. We decided to take a chance, since the option was apparently euthanasia.

    That little dog liked to bark, and couldn't stop. We had her de-barked by the vet. Over here in Holland that is not even allowed, people think it is too cruel. Well it didn't hurt that little dog one bit. For a while she tried to bark, but it only came out like a cough. After a while she didn't bark anymore. And people stopped shouting "shut up!", and she became a lot more popular.

    She lived pretty good with us. My young son loved her, and we went on long walks in the woods every weekend. She enjoyed being treated like 'just one of the guys'.
     
  13. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I used to have trail hounds, mostly redbones, and one good plot, and a good black and tan with a bawl mouth to be envied by all hounds. Trial hounds, live in symbiosis with the hunter. they both want to catch something, the hunter provides the dog a home and care, and more importantly transportation to and from the job. The hound pursues the intended game. (usually after some pretty intensive training) I have had a few hounds I might consider pets, but even if they showed that they liked me, I never fooled myself, if I let down on my end of the deal, that they wouldn't be happier with someone who hunted them.

    I have mixed emotions about my hunting days. I've grown soft in my old age, and don't wish to harm anything, there are times when I wished I had never hunted. At the same time, oh to be young and strong, and chase my hounds through the night up on Breckenridge or Greenhorn mountain again. To slide under that tree and look up at a bear, or bobcat, occasionally a mountain lion was not without its moments.
     
  14. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Telefied Ad Free Member

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    There's a third way a dog can relate (if you can call it that) to people and to the world.

    And that's as a basket case. Some dogs are nuts. Birth defect, injury, poisoning, disease or disorder impacting the brain.

    There are dogs out there who cannot be trained at all. And neither are they "having their own way" in any meaningful sense. If they were a human, we'd have had to strap them into a strait-jacket.
     
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  15. 3-Chord-Genius

    3-Chord-Genius Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'm not one to complain to HOA's, but we had a dog across the street that barked 24/7. Complained.... They got rid of the dog.
     
  16. Jakedog

    Jakedog Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    This is Jackie Chan. Rescue dog. He’s quite a bit of work, but he’s worth it. He spent his first three years of life shut in with an elderly woman. They lived in a tiny one bedroom house together. The only real activity he ever saw was getting let out in the tiny yard a couple times a day to do his business. He never met other people, or animals. As a result, he was never socialized at all and has extreme social anxiety and “stranger danger” issues. Abandonment didn’t help.

    When the old lady had to be moved to assisted living, nobody in her family wanted the dog, so they just left him in her house and called a dog rescue. Poor guy. He was at the rescue for a couple months, with many people coming to look at him but all passing on him because he didn’t want anything to do with them. He was labeled aggressive.

    This dog is about as aggressive as an olive. I know dogs, so I saw it immediately. He wasn’t aggressive in the least. He was totally defensive. Yes, he barked and snarled and growled at anybody who came near him. Because he was scared to death. Poor guy. I’ve never seen an animal more frightened and freaked out.

    I got him home for “trial period”. It took a day and a half before he ate anything. It was another day before he let anybody touch him. That was my son. After about an hour of letting him touch his head and then shying away, he actually allowed him to pet him. Then he laid down by him to watch TV. The next evening he jumped up on the couch and curled up next to my wife, but didn’t want to be petted. It took a couple weeks for him to get comfortable with everybody in the house, but after the first few days he was demonstrably happy to see any of us come back home after being gone. Head would go down, tail would wag, and he’d do what we named his “monkey bear”. A weird grunt and moan language he does when he’s happy.

    After two weeks, I knew the trial was over and told the rescue he wasn’t going anywhere, he was our dog.

    Now we’ve had him for two years. He loves us all, including the cat, like crazy. He treats my youngest totally differently from the rest of us. He loves us all, but she can write her own ticket. She plays with his paws (which he hates from anybody else) plays with his ears, tail, manhandles him all different ways, and he just goes with it. He’ll curl up on anybody’s lap who’s watching TV, he loves belly rubs, he loves playing ball, he sleeps with my middle kid all night every night.
    He’s become my very best buddy in the world.

    He does not do well with visitors. Still very defensive and lots of stranger danger fear, but houseguests he’s ok with. I guess he figures if you move stuff in and spend the night you must be alright. He loves going outside and playing in the backyard with my daughters and all of their friends from the neighborhood. He’s absolutely wonderful outside with all the little girls.

    One of the things we found that made a huge difference was a lot of long walks. I mean 2-3 miles at a time at least couple times a day. Those were bad at first too. He’d never done that before so traffic, bicycles, other people, etc were all a source of HUGE panic and anxiety. But the wife and I figured out he did far better if we kept him on a really short leash and walked him in between us so he felt protected. Now he does great and can’t wait to go.

    The moral of this story is, rescues are a LOT of work. Even if they didn’t have a “bad” or abusive owner, you’re likely getting a “problem” dog. I highly encourage people looking for a dog to adopt, but I always warn them that they should only do so if they have the time and love to put into it. It can be extremely rewarding. It certainly has been for us, and for Jackie. But it takes a LOT of dedication to the animal.





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  17. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    I will never hesitate to suggest my favorite American author , Jim Harrison, to anybody.


    But in your case TD, I would say - what’s the point ?

    And that is a great compliment. I suppose you could read them to see how a seriously great writer plays with words/constructs prose out of poetry but the stories ? You’d probably just call them “Tuesday !” :lol:
     
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  18. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Two fantastic looking dogs.
     
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  19. getbent

    getbent Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I love these thread! great dog Mr. H!

    Boris, I believe you, but I have not met that dude yet. My grandmother adopted a nearly dead dog she found in the street... it had been beaten, tortured, had broken bones a destroyed jaw... all 4'9" of my grandma bagged her and took her to the vet. My grandma was a cat lady (she was a piano teacher, she is the one who lived around the corner from Paul Bigsby) anyway, she had 27 cats or so and her vet loved her... she named the dog Zsa Zsa and got it a rhinestone collar and treated her like a queen. Zsa DEFINITELY had some PTSD, but with love and my grandma's firm but fair house rules... she lived a long and happy life and was mostly normal (acting) I cannot imagine the torture she went through... and she was malformed facially for life...

    My grandma called all living beings 'my darling'... she also once told me (I was about 8) 'watch out for gin, it will sneak up on you.'
     
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  20. imwjl

    imwjl Poster Extraordinaire

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    That's a funny and true off topic diversion here. My wife just finished her 28 year of teaching a challenging category of high school kids. She trained horses and dogs prior. At times I think our kids didn't have much of a chance to try being terrible. Others read books, went to mom discussions, and counseling. She said we'll start parenting with the dog rules - yes, no, sit, stay & come. She figures everyone's screwed if the kids didn't know that in months or the dogs in weeks.

    Call me "whipped" but I've known few people who can get as much done as my wife does with a look and few words. Others' bad dogs follow her. In your high school context she's that teacher teens like me hated and hopefully later on admit they made all the difference for not being in jail or getting through school.

    I'm really sure dogs don't recognize an attractive human or have attraction as we do. There are simple ways plus all that activity they need that can usually get them to be an acceptable member of the pack.

    :)

    Your post reminded me of seeing my favorite high school teacher just after he retired and I dropped out of college. He was PISSED off. It was told to stop truck driving and finish school few words and with a look that hit me all body. Every kid and dog need teachers like that.
     
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