Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Warming ambrosia maple

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by G&Lplayer, Sep 29, 2017.

  1. G&Lplayer

    G&Lplayer Tele-Meister

    220
    Dec 17, 2015
    Virginia
    So I am working on this guitar with ambrosia maple top and back. It is very pale and I want to warm it up. I was thinking clear shellac would help but my test scraps don't thrill me. I am looking for something simple, stain probably, and then I will use shellac and then lacquer. I am open to trying things, just can't afford to buy a ton of test products. IMG_0289.JPG
    Smudges are filler from beetle holes, to be sanded of later today.
     

  2. Strebs

    Strebs Tele-Meister

    199
    Dec 24, 2015
    Birmingham, AL
    Flakey likes this.

  3. bullfrogblues

    bullfrogblues Friend of Leo's

    Jun 5, 2011
    Southeast Florida
    Or amber shellac. This is just amber shellac and clearcoat on old pine.
    Pine offset complete1.jpg
     
    vintagelove, RomanS and Deeve like this.

  4. ndeli55

    ndeli55 Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    33
    May 12, 2008
    oklahoma
    Transfast golden brown or honey amber
     

  5. philosofriend

    philosofriend Tele-Holic

    541
    Oct 28, 2015
    Kalamazoo
    The Orange Shellac is shellac that still has natural wax in it. It is a beautiful product, easy to use. As the pine naturally ages it will look exactly like knotty pine panelling, which is orange shellac over pine. The only bad thing about it is that you can't have the guitar in the hot sun, the wax will cause bubbles in the finish.
    I would use Stewmac vintage amber dye in White Shellac. After a couple months I would give it a thin coat of clear nitro lacquer, it is harder and more durable than shellac, resists water and alcohol better than shellac.
     

  6. G&Lplayer

    G&Lplayer Tele-Meister

    220
    Dec 17, 2015
    Virginia
    So I must ask, what is the dry time for shellac? How long until I can use lacquer, a couple of months seems excessive.
     

  7. old wrench

    old wrench Tele-Meister

    I'd like to comment on the wait time, but I'm afraid my inexperience might get you in trouble ;).

    The shellac I mix up myself dries very quickly, but I have noticed that over time it does "sink in" in relation to the grain - according to the way the harder and softer areas of the wood follow with the grain pattern. I've also seen this effect with laquer too.

    I've used some dewaxed garnet shellac on a light colored catalpa body and got a nice amber-looking finish. One thing I haven't been able to do is get the grain to really stand out with just using shellac though. That's where the stain or dye comes in, to help accentuate the grain.

    The most durable shellac I've used is button lac. The button lac stuff I have is a shade lighter than garnet and is super easy to french polish, probably due to the wax content. I've tested it against platina and garnet dewaxed, and it's quite a bit harder and more durable. If I'm not mistaken, button lac was even used as a floor finish back in the day before finish chemistry developed the products we have now.

    Best Regards,
    Geo.
     

  8. G&Lplayer

    G&Lplayer Tele-Meister

    220
    Dec 17, 2015
    Virginia
    Okay, how about stain? I can get the Minwax stuff locally along with the pre treat. I tried neutral on a test piece and it didn't do much. Is there a color that would work well with maple?
     

  9. oldfish

    oldfish Tele-Holic

    514
    Aug 23, 2015
    uk
    mix up some garnet dewaxed shellac flakes and put plenty of thin layers down then polish it up or put laquer on.shellac dries very fast if put on thin
     

  10. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    15 minutes. Wait a day if it makes you nervous.

    The solvent in shellac is alcohol, it dries by evaporation only and vey quickly as long as you don't lay it on heavily. Shellac sealers of various types re used in professional painting as stain sealers, and recoated almost instantaneously.
     

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