Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups darrenriley.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Want to relic my 2004 Nocaster NOS... Am I Mad??

Discussion in 'Fender Custom Shop Tele Forum' started by nixcaster, Dec 5, 2018.

  1. Wayne Alexander

    Wayne Alexander Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    If you care about resale value, do NOT relic that guitar. Sell it and buy a guitar that is reliced to your taste. If you don't care about destroying the resale value, then do as you will. But the moment you (and likely even if a pro does it) relic that one, you're knocking thousands of dollars off the value.
     
    65 Champ Amp, Ricky D. and nixcaster like this.
  2. Festus_Hagen

    Festus_Hagen Tele-Meister

    Age:
    52
    367
    Jul 6, 2016
    Jeff City, Mo.
    This. ^^^^
     
  3. HappyHwy1owner

    HappyHwy1owner Tele-Meister

    Age:
    50
    419
    Feb 7, 2011
    Independence, Mo
    I think a simple one word answer to your question would suffice-yes!
     
    hdvades and nixcaster like this.
  4. Tony474

    Tony474 Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    71
    Apr 16, 2007
    North Bushey, England.
    Please do not "relic" your guitar. Personally I disapprove and if you'd wanted a Fender relic you'd have bought one in the first place.

    I've done the following to several guitars: get hold of some Micromesh abrasive material, possibly from an eBay seller. It's basically just sophisticated high-tech emery cloth and comes in an assortment of grades. Use it to flat down the gloss on the neck to your preference. It's not a totally irreversible process, as if required you can use the finest grades to restore some of the gloss. I'm very happy with the satin finish I've achieved on the guitars I've treated in this manner.

    If you do need the services of a professional luthier, I thoroughly recommend Terry Chapman of TJC Guitars in Stevenage. Google him. He could even make you a brand new instrument, but he's excellent at repairs and finishing services too, at very reasonable cost.
     
    nixcaster likes this.
  5. dan1952

    dan1952 Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    66
    Jun 24, 2004
    Anderson, IN
    I've seen relic jobs that could fool me, and I've seen thousands of used guitars up close. I have no real
    argument against relics, but find somone who can do it right. It may cost real money, but the best always do...
     
    nixcaster likes this.
  6. GGardner

    GGardner Tele-Holic

    608
    Jun 22, 2017
    NJ
    And you'll feel like an idiot.
     
    nixcaster likes this.
  7. hrstrat57

    hrstrat57 Tele-Afflicted

    Nov 21, 2016
    Rhode Island
    Don't need to sand the back of neck....go to walmart and get the green scotchbrite pad....rub a dub, have at it don't be afraid.

    Will play like magic but visually will be hardly noticeable.

    You're welcome.
     
    nixcaster likes this.
  8. nixcaster

    nixcaster TDPRI Member

    22
    Jul 26, 2009
    London
    Cheers for all the replies and advice, everyone.. scotchbrite is probably a good shout as what I really want is just to lose some of the stickiness of the nitro,. Mainly from the back of the neck.

    Am a bit reluctant to sell and buy a relic as I'm overall really happy with it. Plus, many of the nocasters that come up these days seem to have thinner necks and 9.5 radius boards with jumbo frets... Wtf is up with that?!?

    Will give the scotchbrite a go and maybe sandpaper if I build up the courage.
     
    GGardner likes this.
  9. Festus_Hagen

    Festus_Hagen Tele-Meister

    Age:
    52
    367
    Jul 6, 2016
    Jeff City, Mo.
    A pic of your geetar and what radius you want would help. :)
     
    nixcaster likes this.
  10. telex76

    telex76 Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Age:
    67
    Jun 24, 2006
    Fort Worth,Tx.
    It's yours, do whatever you like. I sand the finish off the back of the neck on all my guitars, including a couple of custom shop models. Why would I want a 2 or 3 thousand dollar guitar that doesn't feel good, or isn't easy to fly around the neck?
     
  11. nixcaster

    nixcaster TDPRI Member

    22
    Jul 26, 2009
    London
    IMG_3138.JPG

    Here you go, Festus...
     
    tce63 and Festus_Hagen like this.
  12. Paul-T

    Paul-T TDPRI Member

    38
    Nov 23, 2018
    London
    that's lovely. Nice to have the thermometer case, too.
     
  13. Blue Bill

    Blue Bill Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Feb 15, 2014
    Maine
    Has anyone ever tried these? I am curious to see what it looks like after a couple sets with these on. Not curious enough to try it on one of mine though. :lol:

    sandhand.jpg
     
  14. Jim603

    Jim603 TDPRI Member

    47
    Jul 3, 2018
    New Hampshire
    I would buy a roadworn neck to replace the original. They are fantastic necks, with the finish already mostly worn off. Totally reversible if you ever decide to sell.
     
  15. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Friend of Leo's

    Aug 10, 2018
    In space with Ziggy
    Do a bunch of research and look at as many pics of real vintage guitars and go for it. Work slow and keep pics of your ideal vintage guitar in front of you while you copy the wear. Stop before you think you have reliced it enough and live with it for a week before proceeding if needed. Less is better, you can't really undo the wear but can always add to it. It's your guitar do whatever you need to do to be entirely happy with it and have fun doing it.
     
  16. Ricky D.

    Ricky D. Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    67
    Oct 22, 2006
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    I've done two of my own necks with 0000 steel wool, backs only. Be sure to tape off the pickups to leave no chance of "crumbs" getting pulled in by the magnets.

    If it was mine, I wouldn't try to do the fingerboard except to cut the gloss. Realistic wear patterns are very difficult to simulate.
     
  17. Festus_Hagen

    Festus_Hagen Tele-Meister

    Age:
    52
    367
    Jul 6, 2016
    Jeff City, Mo.
    Honestly, I'd buy a different body and neck and just build a relic. That one is too nice and it will hurt your resale. You can buy a good, checked, lightweight swamp ash body for 250.00 shipped and relic it anyway you wish. The hard part is the checking.

    20181112_084600.jpg
    20181112_084859.jpg
    20181112_084719.jpg 20181112_084742.jpg
     
  18. 65 Champ Amp

    65 Champ Amp Tele-Holic

    Well, you LOVE and enjoy this guitar, and the only functional (as opposed to cosmetic) complaint is that the back of the neck is a bit sticky.

    Keep ^ that part separate from the rest, and deal with that first. Anything that improves an instrument's playability and sound should be done, imo. If it had sharp fret ends, you'd buy the proper fret files and take care of it. if the nut slots were worn out, you'd cut a new nut out of cow bone. if it had a short, you'd heat up your soldering iron and fix it. When it needs new strings, you replace them. If it were out of tune, you'd tune it. I view a sticky gloss on the back of the neck in the same way.

    And be clear, and be honest with yourself. making the back of the neck more to your liking is not "relicing". It should be considered a functional improvement. So keep that part of your thinking entirely separate from the rest of it.

    I am studiously avoiding expressing my personal disdain for what you call "relicing".
    But I will reiterate the excellent advice some have already given you ~ do what you need to improve the functional playability of your instrument, and take reasonable care of it. Most of all, play the hell out of it. In fact, the more you play it, the less time you will have to contemplate things like trying to make it look like it was owned by someone who actually played it. And indulge your lust for "relics" by trying it out on something with less monetary and functional worth.

    Artificially reliced instruments can be cool looking, for sure. And like a lot of your replies have said, it's an art, and very difficult to do in a way that does not look phony.
    So instead of this guitar, why not hit the pawn shops and find a solid, but common as dirt (or as you say over there, bog standard) Squier tele and try your hand at artificially aging that?
     
    nixcaster likes this.
  19. Tony474

    Tony474 Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    71
    Apr 16, 2007
    North Bushey, England.
    I wouldn't go anywhere near an electric guitar with steel wool, for exactly the reason stated. Micromesh is still the optimal material to use, because of the variety of grades it comes in.

    Note to the OP, nixcaster: I don't know which part of London you're in, but you'd be welcome to come and check out my guitars thus treated, to assess its suitability for your purpose. Drop me a PM if this is of interest.
     
    nixcaster and AAT65 like this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.