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Tweed cabinet build

Discussion in 'Shock Brother's DIY Amps' started by dunehunter, Apr 19, 2018.

  1. dunehunter

    dunehunter Tele-Meister

    Age:
    64
    328
    Jul 14, 2011
    Larkspur, CO
    Hi all,
    As I've been waiting for parts for my SFDR, I've been out in the garage working on building the 4th of my four tweed amp cabinet--a 5F1. I thought I'd start a thread just showing what I've been up to if anyone is interested. I'd love! to hear "better ways" for this and that; this is just the way I've been doing it and it seems to be working now.

    Enjoy!
     
    flyswatter likes this.

  2. dunehunter

    dunehunter Tele-Meister

    Age:
    64
    328
    Jul 14, 2011
    Larkspur, CO
    So just a quick word about wood. I get my pine from Home Depot and I tend to get No. 2 pine. It's not clear and it's not generally pretty, but there it is. The picture below shows specifically what I'm looking for in a 1x10 (in this case--all other cabs, I'm going through the 1x12 stacks). Note in this board, it's basically from the middle of the tree and most of the growth rings are vertical (essentially quarter sawn). The more off axis the flat-sawn board, the greater the likelihood of cupping.

    675.jpg
     

  3. dunehunter

    dunehunter Tele-Meister

    Age:
    64
    328
    Jul 14, 2011
    Larkspur, CO
    Here is the general look of the boards; note the visible "core" running down the middle. As I'm going through a pile (and, I might add, I always put the boards back where they came from :)) i'm looking for that stripe or the coloration of heart wood. 676.jpg
    I know the knots look gnarly, but I've found these to be mostly stable boards that allow me to set them aside and do something else without them twisting into knots.
     
    rickmccl likes this.

  4. dunehunter

    dunehunter Tele-Meister

    Age:
    64
    328
    Jul 14, 2011
    Larkspur, CO
    I won't bore you with most of the table saw cuts; it is what it is. But here's a picture of my cross cut sled and tiny table saw. It's a contractor saw and the reason I went with this one is because it folds up and stows away. I'd love a big cabinet saw but I just don't have the space. 677.jpg
    I've got this one about as "accurate" as I can get it and it has a very high quality combination blade for both crosscuts and rips.
     
    cap47 likes this.

  5. dunehunter

    dunehunter Tele-Meister

    Age:
    64
    328
    Jul 14, 2011
    Larkspur, CO
    So, pretend I've shown you all the first cuts--getting everything to length, including the angle cut for the cabinet fronts. Now comes the fun stuff! The picture here shows what I do to all four pieces that make the essence of the box. I put two sides together, and top and bottom together and begin the process of squaring all the pieces. 652.jpg
    These are the top and bottom together in the vise. I've planed off the end grain and have a straightedge across the top looking for gaps. This looks pretty good.
     
    kleydejong and hoboroadie like this.

  6. dunehunter

    dunehunter Tele-Meister

    Age:
    64
    328
    Jul 14, 2011
    Larkspur, CO
    BTW, if this is totally inappropriate for the use of the forum, I hope someone will stop me. :)
     

  7. SngleCoil

    SngleCoil Tele-Holic

    559
    Apr 13, 2010
    Charlotte, NC
    No, please keep going! I'm getting ready to build my first "real" head cab and have so many questions that you are already starting to answer!
     

  8. dunehunter

    dunehunter Tele-Meister

    Age:
    64
    328
    Jul 14, 2011
    Larkspur, CO
    I'm catching this in the middle of the operation. To the right, the vertical edges have already been squared and are my reference surface. From this angle, the end looks pretty darn square.
    653.jpg
     

  9. jimgchord

    jimgchord Tele-Meister

    Age:
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    Apr 3, 2018
    victor,ny
    In just curious why you don't make templates and just route your pieces to final size?
     

  10. dunehunter

    dunehunter Tele-Meister

    Age:
    64
    328
    Jul 14, 2011
    Larkspur, CO
    Here, though, in the other direction, I show that I've gone a little off with the plane; the left edge is higher than the right. It's important to look at it in all dimensions. In the end, I tilted the plane a little and made this right.
    655.jpg
     

  11. Tapatio

    Tapatio Tele-Meister

    126
    Jun 13, 2016
    New Jersey, USA
    More please! I like where this is going. What plans/design are you using? You mentioned an angled front... is this going to house a 8" or 10" speaker?
     

  12. dunehunter

    dunehunter Tele-Meister

    Age:
    64
    328
    Jul 14, 2011
    Larkspur, CO
    So here's the top and bottom of the cabinet after squaring. For a piece of fine furniture, I might label the pieces differently (I use some squiggles that are traditional for such things); however, this is not fine furniture and I don't want any question about what is the bottom, top, inside, front, etc. I've marked these appropriately on the inside where it will not be visible. 656.jpg
     

  13. dunehunter

    dunehunter Tele-Meister

    Age:
    64
    328
    Jul 14, 2011
    Larkspur, CO
    With a side, now, I show here a bit of cupping on the side piece; I've seen much worse and this will be manageable. 658.jpg
    Note the skunk stripe on the board. As I said before, this is what I am looking for in the lumber as it usually denotes a fairly stable piece of wood.
     
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  14. dunehunter

    dunehunter Tele-Meister

    Age:
    64
    328
    Jul 14, 2011
    Larkspur, CO
    Now it's time to transfer the angles so that I can install the front trim pieces at the top and bottom front of the cabinet. If you make a square cabinet, this is not an issue but with the traditional sloped front of the Fender tweed cabinets, this requires a little additional effort. I use a traditional sliding bevel gauge and take the angle from the top of the cabinet side. 659.jpg
     

  15. dunehunter

    dunehunter Tele-Meister

    Age:
    64
    328
    Jul 14, 2011
    Larkspur, CO
    Now I take the bevel gauge and set the tilt on the table saw blade. 661.jpg
     

  16. dunehunter

    dunehunter Tele-Meister

    Age:
    64
    328
    Jul 14, 2011
    Larkspur, CO
    Now, with the sawblade at the correct angle, I begin to cut those top and bottom trim pieces. I just want to cut enough of the edge to give it the same angle as the sloping cabinet front. The lumber is just (I think) 2" and I want keep most of that. All I want to do is establish the edge at that angle. 662.jpg
    Please, please notice the push block; I still do some squirrelly, stupid things with my table saw but when pieces are this thin (or thinner), I push it through religiously with a push block. Note the saw cuts on the base. When it gets too cut up, I slice off the bottom and re-establish the back catch. Mostly, I treat this machine with the respect it deserves.
     

  17. dunehunter

    dunehunter Tele-Meister

    Age:
    64
    328
    Jul 14, 2011
    Larkspur, CO
    The angles on these pieces are really subtle. So I mark them so I don't get confused. 663.jpg
    I've exaggerated the angle so it's obvious.

    664.jpg
    Note the "angle" representation on the edge. Again, I don't want to get confused.
     

  18. dunehunter

    dunehunter Tele-Meister

    Age:
    64
    328
    Jul 14, 2011
    Larkspur, CO
    Now I'm ready to start laying out the joints; I basically set it up correctly, mark which one is top and bottom, and which way is up (and left and right). I use a sharp pencil for layout. Again, this is not fine furniture...
    667.jpg
    Note, this is where that edge angle comes in; the pieces are laying on an angled surface, but the top and bottom edges are square with the sides.

    Here's the joint layed out. I tend to draw it on all sides.

    668.jpg
    Note these are square to the sloping surface of the front edge.
     

  19. dunehunter

    dunehunter Tele-Meister

    Age:
    64
    328
    Jul 14, 2011
    Larkspur, CO
    I use a real nice little dovetail saw to cut the first small cuts. This is the best saw I've ever owned and cuts this pine like butter. 669.jpg

    And here are my resultant cuts.

    670.jpg
    At worst, I want to split the line, but try to cut on the waste side of the line. Sometimes, I'm more successful than others. :)

    Then I flip it around and cut down to my prior cut. For this, I use the second best saw I've ever had. The plate on my dovetail saw is simply not deep enough to do the job.
    671.jpg
     
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  20. dunehunter

    dunehunter Tele-Meister

    Age:
    64
    328
    Jul 14, 2011
    Larkspur, CO
    And this is where we stop tonight. The joints are cut and I can test fit the top and bottom trim pieces. 672.jpg
    The bottom joint is exactly what I'm looking for. It's a little proud of the bottom and the front. I can take a chisel and make this a very tight, close tolerance joint. 673.jpg
    This joint didn't turn out as planned. It's a bit proud of the front but is a bit short of the top; I'll fix that and only lose a 1/16 of an inch (at most) on the top.
    674.jpg

    Tomorrow, I'll take a chisel to all these joints and fix that top issue. Then, I'll start in on the top and base.
     
    n__B and kleydejong like this.

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