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Tweed and lacquer

Discussion in 'Shock Brother's DIY Amps' started by Robert.V, Jan 5, 2014.

  1. Robert.V

    Robert.V Tele-Meister

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    I just bought me an old 93 bronco tweed wich is in very good clean condition.

    I have been looking for nitro lacquer but it is practically impossible to find here in Holland.

    Can I use polyurethane clear coat lacquer instead?

    We have wood floor lacquer, boat lacquer etc. available.

    some waterbased, some solventbased.

    shellac in flake form is available if you look hard enough but it would be costly by the time you got it ready for use. ( seen 65 euro for a litre)

    I only have one shot at doing this amp so please advise.

    Thanks!
     
  2. joeford

    joeford Friend of Leo's

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    i've had a lot of luck with poly... especially the clear gloss poly from minwax. since you only have one shot with this, i would look into getting a test strip of tweed from ebay and check the results before doing it to your amp
     
  3. Viejo

    Viejo Tele-Meister

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    I believe shellac remains soluble in alcohol even after drying. Given how frequently amps are used for drink tables you should probably avoid shellac. If you use poly I suggest you use use satin finish not gloss.
     
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  5. Robert.V

    Robert.V Tele-Meister

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    So polyurethane would be ok to use?

    I can buy aerosols or just a can,

    which method would give the best results?

    aerosol spray, a brush or a roller?

    And since I have never seen lacquered tweed in the flesh,

    how thick should the finish be applied?

    until the tweed is smooth and "filled"
    or should is still feel rough?

    my guess would be completely filled/smooth?
     
  6. joeford

    joeford Friend of Leo's

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    you have to spray a clear coat onto the tweed first or it will come out blotchy. lay on a couple coats to make sure nothing will seep through. then you can brush, spray, or roller to your hearts content. i prefer brushing since it goes on a little thicker and you have a little more control
     
  7. Robert.V

    Robert.V Tele-Meister

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    Thanks!

    I wouldn't have thought about spraying first to avoid blotching.

    Thats why I like this place so much,
    whatever it is you want to do, somebody will already have done it and tell you what to look out for!
     
  8. Robert.V

    Robert.V Tele-Meister

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    Btw,
    is there a difference in results between polyurethane and acrylic clearcoat?
     
  9. joeford

    joeford Friend of Leo's

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    amen. there's plenty of mistakes on this forum to learn from!
    i've sold "tweed art" at craft shows around here. basically paintings where the negative space is tweed. my first attempt at brushing on the lacquer absolutely ruined it. so yeah, spray a couple coats of clear first haha

    not a canvas piece, but here's my case for reference:
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Robert.V

    Robert.V Tele-Meister

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    Thats cool!
    got more tweed you wanna share?
     
  11. joeford

    joeford Friend of Leo's

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    acrylic is a little more nitro-like in that it'll melt into itself with recoats. its also a little more nitro-like in that it takes longer to dry, and will dry softer than poly. for something that takes a beating as much as an amp... i would definitely recommend poly... at least for the topcoat. lay on the basecoat with a spray can. one can would probably do it for something as small as a bronco... but it never hurts to use two. brush on the stain of your choice. amber and golden oak both look pretty good. layer it on until you get the color you want. then topcoat it with a clear poly and you're good to go. make sure to take some before and after pictures!

    i'm fresh out of tweed at the moment. i've got gold sparkle tolex up to my neck right now though haha
     
  12. Robert.V

    Robert.V Tele-Meister

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    I mean sharing pics of tweed you did,
    like the case with the artwork.

    ;)
     
  13. Robert.V

    Robert.V Tele-Meister

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    Now the amp just sits in the livingroom.

    But it would be cool to have it age
    over time.

    If acrylic does that then ill go that way!
     
  14. joeford

    joeford Friend of Leo's

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    ive never really paid attention to the aging as far as tweed goes. i know the poly i've put on guitars darkens over time... but probably not as much as acrylic. you could have the best of both worlds though, and put some acrylic or nitro under the poly

    i'll have to take a look and see what i've got laying around. i know all the art pieces have been sold. never took any pictures of them either, oddly enough. i think i have a tweed bass case with some doodles on it... i'll check
     
  15. Robert.V

    Robert.V Tele-Meister

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    Well,
    I stripped the Bronco today.

    bought 3 cans of acrylic clear for 2 euros a piece :)

    first I laid a thin mist coat and after dinner I layed on a heavy coat.

    The tweed is already filling up nicely.

    Before:

    ForumRunner_20140106_191410.jpg


    After the light coat:


    ForumRunner_20140106_191512.jpg
     
  16. Robert.V

    Robert.V Tele-Meister

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    I'll lay on one or maybe two coats before bedtime and then tomorrow two more heavy coats.

    Depending on how it looks then I will add more.
     
  17. Robert.V

    Robert.V Tele-Meister

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    Stuff dries faster then I thought.
    2 cans on.

    Tomorrow the third can.

    Maybe I'll get 2 more.
    corners are filled but the large surfaces still need a couple of coats.

    For 2 bucks a can I might as well fill it right up.
     
  18. joeford

    joeford Friend of Leo's

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    looking good so far! i have a hunch it'll turn out great
     
  19. Robert.V

    Robert.V Tele-Meister

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    coworker is bringing me some furniture finish, i dont know the english name for it.

    its between a lacquer and a paint I guess.

    maybe stained laquer?
    its comes in wood tones like dark oak, light oak, natural.

    I'll try a bit on a piece of scrap wood,
    might darken it up a bit before I spray the third can on there.
     
  20. Robert.V

    Robert.V Tele-Meister

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    furniture finish didn't turn out to be something I could use.

    just started can 3 and I'm thinking it wil be enough,
    or maybe just one more to really get it filled.


    Even though I was spraying in the garage,
    my wife was still complaining about the smell.

    Shes used to a wide variety of shovelhead parts being cleaned and or painted in the kitchen or on the dinnertable...

    So what's a guy to do?

    ForumRunner_20140107_185954.jpg

    Thats right,
    you put it on a warm stove to cure.
    whilst running the air cleaner thingy.

    :)
     
  21. Jebrone Lames

    Jebrone Lames Banned

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    Sharing tweed is common among musicians. I got some killer tweed right now. I prefer my tweed green and vibrant.
     
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