Truss rod placement

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by SacDAve, Feb 9, 2019.

  1. SacDAve

    SacDAve Poster Extraordinaire

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    I’m working my first scarf joint neck. The neck is glued up I have the truss rod installed. ( allen nut Hot Rod) Just kind of curious where the brass piece should be located on the nut side. I usually put line it up with the nut. If I move it down a little, I could use a smaller truss rod cover. I can also cut the allen wrench down. There will be a top plate on the head so some of the truss rod slot won’t show. The truss rod dose slide in the slot it’s not loose takes a little tapping. I did put a little silicone on the rod. So how critical is the Brass pieces placemen in relation to the nut. I put up some pictures one has a drawing were the brass is now.

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  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    I usually stick the brass block placed away from the nut. In a couple of instances most is under the fretboard, but some of the brass is still exposed because of the rod length. Ideally I don't want it that way. That way the adjustment doesn't impact the nut itself. The pressure would be on the fretboard or neck wood depending on which way the force was pushing.
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2019
  3. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Holic

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    When I use a double acting rod (which is all I use) I put the head end block directly under the nut and the tail end block somewhere in the heel. Remember that the heel is pretty stiff relative to the rest of the neck and generally won't be bending much either under string tension or from the rod.

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    Remember also how the rod works. Unlike a normal Fender single acting tension rod which is trying to straighten out as its tightened, the double acting rod is pushing up in the middle of the neck and down at the ends. Here is one with one turn of the adjuster showing how much it actually flexes.

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  4. RodeoTex

    RodeoTex Poster Extraordinaire

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    I usually put a dab of latex caulk on the ends of the tr to keep it from moving around.
    I can't imagine how you're going to get the nut situated there.
     
  5. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    The way I do it the space is filled with a filler strip or the majority of the block is under the fretboard. I don't like the idea of the block touching the nut at all. In the event of a backbow, the rod block will push up at the nut. I hope if that's the case the fretboard will contain the pressure. Sometimes you just have to live with the results due to the length. A little more variety in HotRod length from Stewmac would be a plus.


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    Last edited: Feb 9, 2019
  6. SacDAve

    SacDAve Poster Extraordinaire

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    "I can't imagine how you're going to get the nut situated there." not sure what you mean?
     
  7. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Holic

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    Marty, in theory compression fretting is putting some back bow into the neck but I've never seen it become a problem. I build the neck dead flat, when I install the rod it is adjusted neutral. If there is any back bow after fretting that comes out when the frets are leveled. String tension pulls a bit of relief into the neck, if needed the truss rod takes it out by pushing down at the ends and up in the middle. I can honestly say I have never had to put relief into a neck using the rod, but I know it is possible.

    I'm building a neck for an OM right now, the adjuster is in the heel, the block is directly under the nut. I'm comfortable with that.
     
  8. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    Your LP neck is pretty much what I'd do too. With that scale length and neck joint, you don't have much to play with. I always clamp my neck into a bow after fretting to drive barbs into the fretboard. Then it's straight when the clamps come off.


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    Last edited: Feb 9, 2019
  9. Freeman Keller

    Freeman Keller Tele-Holic

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    Warmoth does something similar - they clamp their necks in some sort of jig with a very tiny bit of a bow.

    Also, I've just discovered Bitterroot truss rods - they apparently make them in 1 inch increments which will be very handy for those odd ball scale length necks.
     
  10. SacDAve

    SacDAve Poster Extraordinaire

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    Interesting I might give that a try. I have a back bow in the one I'm doing but still have to do a leveling on the board. When I glued the board on the neck blank I made a 19"long 10" radios caul. the caul is made out of partial board I didn’t want anything to rigid. When I clamped it I put some ¼” neoprene (no very soft)) between the caul an a piece of ¾ oak I wanted a nice even pressure on the board when I clamped it. BTW I’m always trying different methods when I build stuff.

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  11. SacDAve

    SacDAve Poster Extraordinaire

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    I moved the brass piece back under the nut
     
  12. eallen

    eallen Tele-Afflicted

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    I have used bitter root rods Freeman mentioned for years without a hitch. Being able to get shorter rods allows you to do end them under the nut or before if needed.

    I always install the truss rod flat and the neck flat. I adjust it flat after pressing the frets in if need be for level. Once strings are installed though the strings relieve all pressure from the rod.

    Eric
     
  13. TRexF16

    TRexF16 Friend of Leo's

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    Speaking of available length in one inch increments, Bitterroot was the only rod I found that I could get "just right" for a baritone neck. There may be others, I just didn't find them. These are two necks for a switch neck body, a Baritone with a tele headstock and a 24 3/4" scale with a Strat headstock. Bitterroots in both. The intonation does not even need to be adjusted when the necks are swapped!
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  14. zorgzorg2

    zorgzorg2 Tele-Meister

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    I found a good variety of length on black dog music, on the European side. I found there a perfect sized truss rod for a 23 inch tenor guitar.
     
  15. SacDAve

    SacDAve Poster Extraordinaire

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    I just bookmarked Bitterroot guitars, Looks like a great place for truss rods among other stuff.
     
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