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Truss rod depth

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Amerman, May 16, 2018.

  1. Amerman

    Amerman TDPRI Member

    80
    Aug 23, 2017
    Underwater
    So I've routed a truss rod slot in a neck blank. It's a custom arc, designed to be adjusted at the body end. Stupidly I routed the slot prior to final thicknessing the neck, wich I subsequently thinned down on the rear instead of the fretboard side.

    The result is the truss rod is pretty deep, 17mm slot depth around the 5th fret. This will leave me with around 3mm of wood at the thinnest point. (20mm blank for a two piece neck).

    Is that enough wood, or is the neck scrap now? I know it should be thin, but 3mm is pretty damn skinny!
     

  2. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    If it's a single rod then you should be OK. The single truss rod works by pushing up as the rod tries to straighten out. A double rod pushes down at the ends of the rod and up in the center of the rod. .
     

  3. Amerman

    Amerman TDPRI Member

    80
    Aug 23, 2017
    Underwater
    It is a single action truss rod yeah. Not something I've done (successfully) before son nervous about getting it right.

    Thanks for the advice
     

  4. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    I should also have mentioned the double rod design pushes down in the center when used to correct a back bow.
     

  5. s_tones

    s_tones Tele-Holic

    790
    Nov 10, 2013
    central CA
    cant you just glue a shim in there or something?
     

  6. Vizcaster

    Vizcaster Friend of Leo's

    Sep 15, 2007
    Glen Head, NY
    Did you rout from the fingerboard side and it's just close to the otherwise solid back of the neck? Or did you rout from the back and are worried that the skunk stripe will be too thin to be stable?

    BTW you need to account for the taper of the back profile so the dimension might get a little more critical.

    s/tones has a good idea IF you used a flat bottomed router bit you could lay in a thin strip the same width as your slot - not an option if you used a bullnose bit and have a rounded bottom trussrod channel.
     

  7. stormin1155

    stormin1155 Tele-Meister

    275
    Sep 26, 2010
    Iowa
    Purists might scoff at this idea, but you could cut a thin strip of wood the width of your channel and a couple mm thick and glue it along the bottom of the channel. If the channel is too deep, you'll have to use a filler either above or below the rod... might as well put it below where it might do some good.
     

  8. Amerman

    Amerman TDPRI Member

    80
    Aug 23, 2017
    Underwater
    It's routed from the fingerboard side yes. I am reluctant to shim it as I already flattened out the radius of the channel to get the exit hole at the body end lower. And drilled it :(
     

  9. RogerC

    RogerC Poster Extraordinaire Vendor Member

    Mar 30, 2011
    Oklamerica
    I’d count it as a lesson and start over.
     
    wadeeinkauf likes this.

  10. philosofriend

    philosofriend Tele-Holic

    745
    Oct 28, 2015
    Kalamazoo
    3 mm is plenty as long as no one in the future likes shallow necks and starts carving.

    I suppose you might not want to sell the guitar for a couple of years, because if you tighten that truss rod way too tight for whatever reason, the wood on the back of the neck could split. I saw that happen on a neck I made that had like only 1mm of wood back there.

    Glueing a strip or two of veneer down there wouldn't be too hard.
     

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