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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Tried to fix a run...and now I need advice

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by slick4772, Aug 22, 2017.

  1. slick4772

    slick4772 Tele-Meister

    148
    Jan 21, 2013
    Pittsburgh
    I actually was trying to fix a couple of runs in a finish by scraping them with a razor blade and I accidentally scraped too far down and hit the primer. So - I tried something but before I do anything else, I'd like some advice.

    I should tell you I'm using Reranch sonic blue and Sherwin Williams Lovoc lacquer (nitro).

    What I did was sand a lot of the runs out and if I hadn't gone color on a couple of tiny spots I would have probably been able to just spray more clear and been good. But - I didn't want to see the spots so I sprayed more color. Anyone that's ever done this knows that the color mixed with the clear looks like crap because you've got fresh color laying on other color that was sprayed with clear - and clear lacquer tints the color.

    My question is - if I spray more clear over that color, will I be ok once I start leveling the clear? Will the clear mix with the color (melt into the color coat) so that everything will look more uniform? Or am I better off starting over?

    I ask because isn't what I've done basically the same thing that one might do to fix a chip in a guitar by using drop fills?

    Thanks.
     

  2. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    Nope - where the two mix your color and clear depth will both be fouled. If the color gets messed up the only way to make it consistent is to sand the existing surface smooth (applying drop fills if you have chips or damage), apply a full coverage color coat (or more if you can't get coverage in 3 passes) followed by a complete system of clear (I normally apply 4-5 coats, which is 12-15 passes. Sometimes more depending on the finish color). Then off to the buffer.

    If the clear coats are smooth there should not be a need for sanding - or at least not much.

    When you said you sanded runs - runs in what, and what did you do afterwards?
     

  3. slick4772

    slick4772 Tele-Meister

    148
    Jan 21, 2013
    Pittsburgh
    Runs in the clear. I got too much on with one of the passes.

    Sounds like I'm starting over. Ok. Good to know before I waste any more clear.
     

  4. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    Not completely - since you already have film build that smooths the wood surface you should be able to use less color than you normally would. It should be much easier to get coverage. And of course, never sand color coats - if you sand at all it should only be clear, and if you have runs or just can't get a smooth finish for some reason (although IMO with practice on scrap you should be able to learn to eliminate sanding altogether!)
     

  5. slick4772

    slick4772 Tele-Meister

    148
    Jan 21, 2013
    Pittsburgh
    Ok. So you're saying that I should sand the existing clear - using it as a sealer or base coat (all over the guitar) and then apply 3 passes of color and then reapply my clear. That sounds less daunting. Thanks.
     

  6. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Age:
    65
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    That's it! As long as you get it sanded smooth you only need full coverage of the color. If you can get it in one coat (3 passes) great - if not you can simply apply another coat - or however many it takes - a few minutes later.
     

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