Tree freaks ? Arborists ? What kinda tree is this ?

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by Mike Eskimo, Jun 17, 2019.

  1. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    74E18BCB-E036-4E15-BD16-D49C6BC1C0FB.jpeg 2EBC75A9-633D-4952-B93C-75138839C926.jpeg

    Bark and the tiny elm-shaped leaves.

    We’ve lived here for 20 years this tree has grown quite a bit since then and every year of those 20, the leaves get munched on by these little bugs - doesn’t kill the tree.

    I’d say the leaves max out maybe at 2 inches but most of them - an inch to an inch and a half long.

    A gigantic version of this exact tree is about three houses down and we think that’s the mother since our tree is exactly on our property line next to our garage and no one purposely planted it there. We actually boxed our fence around the tree. We like it because it hides the transformer and the power pole right behind it.

    Anybody?
     
  2. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Tele Axpert Ad Free Member

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    Sorry for such an obvious and uninteresting answer, but ELM leapt to my mind.
    The bark and the leaves look right.
    I kinda sorta know wood/trees.
    I’m no expert/pro.
     
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  3. uriah1

    uriah1 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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  4. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    Chinese elm, I think.
    http://forestry.sfasu.edu/faculty/s.../photographs/446-ulmus-parvifolia-chinese-elm
    We have 'em here, too, in Virginny. Can be messy trees, dropping lots of leaves, branches, etc. But do fill the niche that the American elm held until (nearly) wiped out. Impressive when big, and they can get HUGE. Notorious baby-tree makers, too. Where you have one, you'll find many taking root here and there, as they produce tons of seeds.

    I'm looking at three monsters right now, and they do a fair approximation of the missing American elm. Sorta like a decent pedal imitating an amp effect....

    Looks like the elm leaf beetle is enjoying them, too.
    https://extension.umd.edu/hgic/elm-leaf-beetle
    Seem to be wherever Chinese elms are. In some years, they can devour the leaves pretty good, but the elms generally bounce back.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2019
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  5. Torren61

    Torren61 Tele-Afflicted

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    Alder. The bugs are alder beetles.

    Cut it down and make a few strats. :p
     
  6. E5RSY

    E5RSY Poster Extraordinaire

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    Not an ash. Ashes are "opposite-leaved" like maples. The branch in the picture looks like it's "alternate-leaved".

    [​IMG]
     
  7. 2 Headed Goat

    2 Headed Goat Tele-Afflicted

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    I haven't had brekkie yet and thought your post said Three Freaks.... Lol, good band name for a 3 piece - eh?
     
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  8. Dave Hicks

    Dave Hicks Tele-Afflicted

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    An elm - probably Siberian based on the bark.

    https://wunderwoods.wordpress.com/2014/09/01/siberian-elm-is-not-chinese-elm/

    D.H.
     
  9. 1293

    1293 Poster Extraordinaire

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    Phineas, Fat Freddy, and Freewheelin' Franklin
     
  10. E5RSY

    E5RSY Poster Extraordinaire

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    Don't forget the cat...
     
  11. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    I dunno. Siberian elm is a weedier, brushier tree, as per this site's comparison:
    https://www.unce.unr.edu/publications/files/ho/other/fs8533.pdf

    Maybe some North Korean forced hybrid, then, prone to gouty hair and fulminating offal...?

    Glad to see that efforts to revive the American elm and chestnut have some hope.
    https://blog.nature.org/science/2017/08/09/quest-restore-american-elms-nearing-finish-line/

    https://www.americanforests.org/magazine/article/revival-of-the-american-chestnut/

    Let's hope the ash and hemlock can survive their current onslaught of invasive species....
     
  12. Buckocaster51

    Buckocaster51 Super Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    A shot of the crown of the tree can be useful in ID
     
  13. Dave Hicks

    Dave Hicks Tele-Afflicted

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    Siberian elm can be a large tree - on the other side of the building I'm in there is one that is single-trunked (not very good form, though), and taller than the 3-story building. It looked like this after an ice storm in 2008:

    upload_2019-6-17_14-19-25.png
     
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  14. RoscoeElegante

    RoscoeElegante Friend of Leo's

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    One of the monsters I'm looking it is like Lurch as Sentry. It's at the corner where our quiet street meets a main, busier one. It drops huge limbs at near-random, so you'll see traffic blocked as people are having to work together to drag a limb or two out of the way, like invaders at the border. Last year the beetles made it look like lace, but it's come back mightily this (wet!) Spring.
     
  15. Dave Hicks

    Dave Hicks Tele-Afflicted

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    Eastern alders are shrubby, not tree-sized (I'm assuming the OP is in Detroit). Also, there are elm fruits visible in the photo of the branch (some seem to be attached to the branch).

    [​IMG]
     
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  16. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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  17. Torren61

    Torren61 Tele-Afflicted

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    I've been wrong before... :cry:
     
  18. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    ^^^^It’s all right man , you’ll get back up on that horse - I just know it ! I appreciate your effort!
     
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  19. teletimetx

    teletimetx Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'm thinking elm tree, but can't tell from the photos. If there were close up photos of the leaves, front & back, that would help. Bark sure looks like elm.

    Looks like because the edges of many elm trees have that sawtooth like edge and I think that's what is showing in your photo, but can't say for sure. See link below for leaf photo.

    A number of hybrid elms have been developed as well, so trying to call it one species or another? who knows?

    Here's a link from your local friendly state university:

    https://www.canr.msu.edu/resources/hybrid_elms
     
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