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To Throw Down Your Guitar or To Not Throw Down Your Guitar

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by GoldDeluxe5E3, Jan 18, 2017.

Is it ever OK to throw down an instrument?

  1. No, not unless safety depends upon it.

    52.1%
  2. Yes, I think it's a valid form of artistic expression.

    13.0%
  3. Only wieners throw down their instruments, except that one time Jimi did it.

    32.9%
  4. I throw down my instrument all the time. Anybody have a spare instrument?

    2.1%
  1. 1955

    1955 Poster Extraordinaire

    Apr 10, 2010
    Certain uncertainty
    It was very simple. I wasn't playing for crud, went out of tune, I threw it in frustration, the neck snapped right off. Learned my lesson. Poor guitar, it was my fault I couldn't play the stupid thing.
     
    TMMC likes this.

  2. alnico357

    alnico357 Tele-Meister

    158
    Jun 2, 2015
    Arkansas
    Late at night, the end of the road
    He wishes he still had that old guitar to hold......
     
    Omiewise65, GoldDeluxe5E3 and tery like this.

  3. tery

    tery Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Sep 21, 2012
    Tennessee
    :eek: Throw down a guitar ..... WHAT :confused:
     

  4. Obsessed

    Obsessed Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Nov 21, 2012
    Montana
    Cliche after the 60s, anything later is pathetic and a waste.

    Sad too.
     
    GoldDeluxe5E3 likes this.

  5. fatcat

    fatcat Friend of Leo's

    Jul 6, 2010
    Very Deep South
    The only exception i can say yes to is when the bar fight gets too out of hand. Then start swinging!
     
    TMMC likes this.

  6. Paul in Colorado

    Paul in Colorado Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 17, 2003
    Fort Collins, CO
    And don't drop the mic! Especially a good one.
     
    TMMC and tery like this.

  7. studio1087

    studio1087 Telefied Ad Free Member

    May 10, 2003
    Near Milwaukee
    Breaking instruments is silly. It's been done and done and it's wasteful. If you want to be bad*ss give the guitar to the youngest person in the front row. Be kind, be a hero.
     
    Bruxist and JayFreddy like this.

  8. knopflerfan

    knopflerfan Tele-Afflicted

    Mar 18, 2012
    In the woods

  9. GoldDeluxe5E3

    GoldDeluxe5E3 Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    749
    Aug 5, 2015
    Concord CA
    Yeah, it's like that '60 movie posted above where Jeff Beck gets an amp malfunction in the middle of a song and tries to fix the problem by smashing his guitar. I wonder if JB is proud of that moment.
     

  10. ricknbaker

    ricknbaker Tele-Holic

    627
    Nov 12, 2014
    Watford, UK
    Actually, you're close with that one. Townshend cites his tutor at Ealing Art College, Gustav Metzger, as an influence on his guitar destroying career. Metzger developed the concept of auto destructive art. So smashing things is seen as an artform. By some people.
     
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  11. wayloncash

    wayloncash Tele-Afflicted

    Apr 7, 2012
    Houston, TX
    I mean come on, it can't ever be really real Right? Cause lower rung performers can't afford to damage their gear. Most musicians have a bond with their instrument. Higher echelon performers doing this have obviously planned it out ahead of time, and destroying something for the sake of looking cool knowing it will be replaced for you is just lame. I mean if you can afford to replace an instrument every night then the act itself has lost its meaning.
    Now I am sure there are exceptions, like a one time thing where someone was really feeling it, but you know someone with that level of passion would likely regret it because of the bond with the instrument. Also you have the "I am not in control of my actions" guy, which we know from all having generally the same human experience this is either a lie or they have a diminished mental capacity.
     
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  12. ricknbaker

    ricknbaker Tele-Holic

    627
    Nov 12, 2014
    Watford, UK
    TMMC likes this.

  13. 4 Cat Slim

    4 Cat Slim Friend of Leo's

    Oct 17, 2012
    Nelson City TX
    Anybody here remember Black Oak Arkansas? In the mid 1970s, they use to slam their guitars into each others' guitars into bits.
    [I later read in Guitar Player Magazine that they only did this in major markets and the guitars were
    Ventura copies of Gibsons.] It was sort of impressive to me when I was younger.

    I'm not so sure if I appreciate people destroying guitars anymore.
     

  14. brookdalebill

    brookdalebill Telefied Ad Free Member

    Age:
    60
    Nov 15, 2009
    Austin, Tx
    I saw them do it on TV when I was a pup.
    Snore.
    Lotta hair, lotta noise.
    Showbiz.
    My favorite part of their show was the late Ruby Starr.
    RIP, Ruby.
    Shawn Lane played with them early his career, kinda late in BOA's.
    That feller could play.
    RIP, Shawn.
     
    wayloncash and TMMC like this.

  15. TMMC

    TMMC Tele-Afflicted

    Apr 3, 2013
    SLC
    I think it's real. Rather it can be.

    I played in a few punk bands back in the day, and there was a collective think going on, it was image, it was a part of the energy, it was manic. It was every bit as real as the angst, the mohawks, the piercings, the tattoos, the drugs, the booze, the fights, the raw edge of music. I get that people can't see how it would be real, or how it's cliche, but it's every bit as real for some as playing an encore or stage diving or any other stage antic. And while it is definitely cliche, or can be, what at this point isn't?

    I realize I come off as a huge proponent for this act, but I'm really not. I love my guitars, and at my age would never treat them in such a way. But at 18, when I had a MIM Strat and a Jackson offset V, if the show was the right atmosphere, 500 punker kids bouncing and singing along, who knows... I just don't think it's as black and white for everyone as it clearly is for many, and I guess that includes me. But to say it's not real isn't really fair, because to some it probably very much is. Cliche? Yeah, but again, what isn't at this point?
     
    wayloncash likes this.

  16. GoldDeluxe5E3

    GoldDeluxe5E3 Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    749
    Aug 5, 2015
    Concord CA
    Now there's an exhaustive list of instrument destroyers. It just dawned on me that instrument destruction is sometimes like tossing a snifter into the fireplace after a toast. What's that all about?
     

  17. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Telefied Ad Free Member

    Wow. You must hang out with dukes and earls. We just crush the can.
     
    Jakeboy and GoldDeluxe5E3 like this.

  18. teletimetx

    teletimetx Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

    Jul 25, 2011
    Houston, TX
    ...thanks for the reminder, amigo! Shawn Lane had an amazing life; I wasn't all that familiar with him, but here's some pretty amazing tidbits, courtesy of Wiki ( apologies for a minor thread detour, but Shawn Lane, man!):

    "Born in Memphis, Tennessee, Lane began playing piano with his sisters at the age of eight, but did not play guitar seriously until he was ten. At age 12–13 he began to practice heavily. At fourteen, he became the lead guitarist for Black Oak Arkansas (BOA) and alongside members, including drummer Tommy Aldridge, toured over the next four years opening shows for bands including REO Speedwagon, Ted Nugent, Outlaws, Cheap Trick, Molly Hatchet and Blue Öyster Cult."

    fourteen!

    "From age eighteen to twenty-six, Lane studied music, composed music, and played piano. ... Much of the material on Lane's first studio album, Powers of Ten, was written on his home piano.
    ...
    Musically, Lane was influenced by many other artists but an important one was Pakistani musician
    Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan. Called “the King of Kings of Qawwali” and very popular in Pakistan, India and Southern Asia, Khan fascinated Lane deeply with his wide vocal range and the intertwining of his voice with the notes from his instrument.
    ...
    Although not a familiar name to many outside musician's circles, today's guitar virtuosos such as
    Rusty Cooley, Michael Romeo, Guthrie Govan, Buckethead, Paul Gilbert – who called Lane "the most terrifying guy of all time" during a guitar clinic when asked about his thoughts on Lane's guitar playing skills – and many others regard him extremely highly."

    Anyway, lot of fascinating stuff; Mr. Lane played guitar all over the world. thanks again!
     
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  19. GoldDeluxe5E3

    GoldDeluxe5E3 Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    749
    Aug 5, 2015
    Concord CA
    So maybe smashing your guitar at the end of a performance is just like squashing a beer can when you're through with it. Maybe we just need a cheaper line of guitars that are made for squashing.
     

  20. suave eddie

    suave eddie Tele-Holic

    832
    Feb 28, 2009
    Great White North
    The song is great. My "lame" comment was directed towards those that toss their guitars around.
     
    GoldDeluxe5E3 likes this.

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