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The Walnut Telecaster Build

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Marn99, Jan 27, 2017.

  1. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    17
    392
    Nov 25, 2016
    Brookfield, WI
    Hey everyone!
    So after a long time of asking build questions in different threads I got the tip that it would be better for me to make a build thread, so not only is this going to be where I post questions, but also where I post my progress! Here's the lowdown, this is a quartersawn Black Walnut Telecaster with a quartersawn Hard Maple neck and East Indian Rosewood fingerboard, a W/B/W pickguard, chrome vintage style hardware, a bone nut, and a tung oil finish (though I might do a switch it to a tung oil varnish blend like Old Masters). The template is from guitarbuildingtemplates.com of a 1958 custom shop Telecaster.
    Now that I've set the premise for my first build, I guess I should start with my first question. Can someone, using arrows, show me which way I need to route on a Telecaster body to prevent tearout? I saw the body building 101 thread but I struggled to understand the drawings. Second, when routing the body shape, do I need to flip over the body at all to prevent tearout? If you are kind enough to draw me a diagram with arrows, can you indicate which spots and which direction I need to route if I have to flip the body over?
    Thanks everyone and stay tuned!
     
  2. TMMC

    TMMC Tele-Afflicted

    Apr 3, 2013
    SLC
    Awesome. Can't wait.
     
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  3. adirondak5

    adirondak5 Wood Hoarder Extraordinaire Ad Free + Supporter

    Age:
    61
    Oct 24, 2009
    Long Island NY
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  5. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    17
    392
    Nov 25, 2016
    Brookfield, WI
    I'm interpreting this correctly right?

    routing direction.png
     
  6. El Tele Lobo

    El Tele Lobo Tele-Afflicted

    Oct 21, 2014
    Florida
    Subscribed. Best of luck with your build! Looking forward to seeing your results and learning from your experience!
     
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  7. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

    Mar 27, 2012
    Calgary, Alberta
    Are you using a router table or by hand? There's been a lot of discussion about the downhill routing method here on TDPRI. Some are totally opposed and some are for it. YMMV.

    I use a router table and cut and sand as close to the line as possible first. I go from left to right and never had an issue if I did that. Especially at the horns. I had tearout when I left too much material around the horns. An 1/8 of an inch is way too much.
     
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  8. Steve Holt

    Steve Holt Tele-Meister

    484
    May 29, 2016
    Kansas
    I can't help you much with your question but I can talk about the direction of the grain when you're running a jointer. If you run your finger along the surface of the wood in one direction you'll notice that the grain is running with your finger, if you got the other direction the grain is going against your finger. It's like petting a cat or dog. you'll be able to feel the difference, although if the board is already smooth it may be tougher, but just concentrate and try to feel for the difference. There are also pictures online that demonstrate the grain direction but I always go by feel. The grain will be running the opposite direction on the opposite sid I also try to get my the board as close to my line as I possibly can before routing and it goes way easier.
     

    Attached Files:

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  9. adirondak5

    adirondak5 Wood Hoarder Extraordinaire Ad Free + Supporter

    Age:
    61
    Oct 24, 2009
    Long Island NY
    Yes , you are interpreting it correct . Just go slow and steady , the areas where you will be moving the body with the rotation of the bit be especially mindful , have a good firm hold . I'ved tried Jack's method and it does work but I don't like routing with the rotation , I prefer to move the work against the rotation of the bit and very light cuts and have been happy with my results . You will through experience find your own way that you are confident and comfortable with . Just be mindful to keep your grip firm , your movements slow and steady and your hands/fingers away from the cutter/bit .
     
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  10. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    17
    392
    Nov 25, 2016
    Brookfield, WI
    Cool, I guess that answers my first question! Now on to the next two. I am doing a slab board fingerboard and I was wondering which of these two necks is correct to vintage slab style necks. If it is neck B, how do I do that small bit of maple above the nut hole?
    truss rod profiles.png
     
  11. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    17
    392
    Nov 25, 2016
    Brookfield, WI
    Router table, as I am using a template and bearing bits.
     
  12. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    If you are doing a vintage single rod, the anchor and nut holes are 3 and 2 degrees respectively. You would have to make the jig to rout that arc or make a straight slot and glue in a curved ramp piece into the slot. The anchor and nut holes would then be drilled into the neck after the curved slot is made. You can find the neck drawing in this site under the tele drawings labled Halse:

    http://www.gitarrebassbau.de/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=6


    If you are doing a double hotrod style rod, the nut will be in a different spot determined by the rod's bottom rod centerline placement in the slot.

    I would add that you can go for a vintage neck look with the single rod, but it is way more work.

    For your first neck, I'd suggest the hotrod for its relative ease of installation. You could still add a fake walnut plug on top and a fake skunk stripe if you wanted, for the "look". You'll find that that plug is way harder to get right when you aren't using a guide like Fender or other industry builds.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2017
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  13. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

    Jul 6, 2012
    North of Boston
    Leo might tell you that the vintage way was which ever way got the job done, neither version has an impact on tone. +1 on what Marty said ...a vintage rod, 1 way, the channel is routed in an arch so the location at the nut and the location at the heel as far as the cross section with the rod goes could be very different.
     
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  14. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    17
    392
    Nov 25, 2016
    Brookfield, WI
    I am using a hot rod truss rod, I also have the special hot rod router bit for it. The instructions with the rod are somewhat unclear, how should I route the channel?
     
  15. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    The instructions say make the slot 7/16" deep. It's a straight slot made in 3 passes or so. I'd do it on a router table against a fence while the wood is a rectangle.


    From the website:

    Follow these steps to install the rod:

    1.

    Saw or rout a slot down the centerline of the neck, 7/32" (0.218") wide and 7/16" (0.437") deep. Provide an access for the adjusting nut:



    For the Slotted nut, you'll need a 3/8"-diameter recess( hole), 1/2" deep on line with the active rod, to accommodate the adjusting nut;


    for the 4mm Allen nut, use a 1/4" recess, about 1/2" deep;

    for the 1/4" Hex nut, use a 7/16" recess, about 1/2" deep.

    The recess can be made with a piloted drill bit, or by clamping a hardwood filler strip into the slot, and drilling as though there is no slot.


    I'd measure and draw the rod full size in your front or side view of your drawing. If you got the Fender nut, you can drill in from the end of the neck so that the nut slides into the hole you drill for it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2017
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  16. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    17
    392
    Nov 25, 2016
    Brookfield, WI
    thanks, I basically want to install it like this.[​IMG]
     
  17. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Well, you measure down from the top of the rod end block to the centerline of the nut. That's how far down the end you need to measure from the top. I'd draw it out and you'll see where the centerline of that bottom rod is. :). The slot is 7/16 deep but the center of the hole in the end for adjustment isn't down that far because it is at the center of the bottom rod.
     
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  18. Steve Holt

    Steve Holt Tele-Meister

    484
    May 29, 2016
    Kansas
    I second all of this advice especially routing the channel before you do any shaping on the neck. It makes it much easier to cut a great channel. And as far as the depth goes, take your time and make multiple passes. You can always make another cut a little bit deeper, but you can't put it back once it's cut.
     
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  19. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

    Mar 27, 2012
    Calgary, Alberta
    I once again refer you to Fletch's video. View the neck building series. He is using a hot rod and does his a touch different as he uses the spoke but you'll get the idea.

    Mine end up more like A in your diagram.

     
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  20. Marn99

    Marn99 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    17
    392
    Nov 25, 2016
    Brookfield, WI
    Alright, I am starting the build tomorrow! I have a question about countersinking the pickguard screws. I am going to use a 82 degree countersink bit, but how do I know when to stop? Is there a particular depth that I should put the depth stop on the drill press?
     
  21. Steve Holt

    Steve Holt Tele-Meister

    484
    May 29, 2016
    Kansas
    If it were me I'd take a piece of scrap pickguard and do a few test holes. Find the depth you like that looks nice with your screws and then set your depth based on that.

    Also did you ever decide on pickups?

     
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