The "Run before you walk"caster

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Mat UK, Nov 24, 2014.

  1. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Thanks Brian. The biggest question for the top is which direction do I have the sap grain facing - tapering towards the neck or tapering away from the neck.
     
  2. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Can anyone help me with the above question? Thanks
     
  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    In cases where I have questions about wood warping, I glue wood so the the end grain looks like a frown, not a smile, since warp would be opposite of the direction of those rings. I'd rather have cup down as opposed to cup up, but that's me.

    If the wood is seasoned and dry, I doubt you'll have much of a problem after it is glued on to the base material. Keeping it flat before you glue it down will be the trick if it is thin and not quarter sawn. I don't know if that helps with your question or not.
     
  4. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    That does help, thanks. There is warp, it's been sitting in storage for about a year, so hopefully it's done any movement it's going to do. Following your advice, from an aesthetic point of view I hope that means the nice side faces up!
     
  5. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Today I spent some time roughing out the templates with a jigsaw. I have three to setup, general template, chamber template and pocket template.

    Pics of progress attached.

    I'm going to hand sand to the line. I have a dremel workstation I can set up as a mini drum sander, but it kicks up a huge amount of dust and the vision is not great. I need to cut the chambering and pocket out still, I'm going to use a drill (need to buy one!) to start off the cut and then jigsaw it out.

    Once I have the general template hand sanded I'll use this to route the other two templates.
     

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  6. nosmo

    nosmo Friend of Leo's

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    You shouldn't require any router bits larger than 1/2" or 3/4" (sorry, you'll have to do the converting to mm). They should all be fine at higher speeds. I would never run a router bit above its rated speed. At best it will burn your work, at worst it will hover the router off the work and fly out the window. Or something like that.
     
  7. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Ha, lot's of practise on scrap for me then - hopefully that will clip the routers wings.

    Thanks, that's really helpful
     
  8. ItZaLLGooD

    ItZaLLGooD Tele-Holic

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    I have built 3 guitars with nothing more that a 1/4" and 1/2" bit. The 1/2" bit has a bearing on it for following the template. I keep the router speed in the middle of its adjustment. Go slow and don't try to route off too much wood in one pass.
     
  9. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Pretty dull day today. Shaped the main body template. Used a square cutoff of MDF, a roll of tape, and an empty inhaler cartridge as sanding blocks... Hi-tech stuff!

    Going to use this template to route the other two templates.

    Bought some extras today: Drill, Forstner bits, Brad point bits and centre punches - I'm surprise my girlfriend hasn't noticed the stack of tools taking over the corner of the lounge!

    Here be pics.
     

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  10. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Quite a bit done today (For me)

    Cutout and shaped the pickup cavities on the template... bit boring

    IMG_4371.jpg

    Finally attempted thicknessing the ash body blank. Spent a lot of time researching and planning this (This was the biggest hurdle when I started planning last year.) Couldn't afford a thicknesser or jointer, so settled on building a jig based on this video



    The Jig
    My jig was a fairly basic setup. The sled was made from doubled up and glued 18mm MDF (doubled to remove slight warp) with a router shaped hole cut centre into one layer. The router was machine screwed onto the sled. The base and rails were also made from 18mm MDF, the rails were strips stacked and clamped to the base. Accuracy-wise, the rails probably varied in height by about 0.30mm - I played around a bit with different pressures on the clamps but decided .30mm was accurate enough, and the lighter the pressure the better so there was less compression on the ends.

    IMG_4367.jpg

    IMG_4368.jpg

    The Routing

    First time I've used a router... ever! I used an 19mm diameter 12mm deep straight router bit to mill the surface. The blank started off at about 46mm thick (unevenly), I was aiming for 41mm. I took 1mm of one face to level, then I flipped it and took three passes to get to depth.

    I ended up at 40.8mm(isn). RESULT! And I also ended with a lounge full of wood shavings, wood chips and wood dust! I wish I had a workshop and/or a cleaner!

    Couple of pics attached. Sorry for using millimetres!

    IMG_4369.jpg
     
  11. barbrainy

    barbrainy RIP

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    1) Thickness routing in the lounge? Your girlfriend is either very understanding, or away.

    2) Please don't apologise for using metric. Many of us outside of the USA really rather like it!
     
  12. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    Understanding, yes. Away, no. I've taken the week off work to make some progress on this build. So, it's been a race every day to clean up before she gets home. I reckon she secretly likes it - I don't think I've hoovered and dusted so much before in my life! It's when she comes home to find I've used her favourite top as a rag that there will be a problem...

    In the interest of being fair, maybe I should start using an entirely different unit of measurement, one that no one can easily digest... like cubits
     
  13. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    A bit of advice please. I'm not far from routing the body shape. I have always planned on hand routing it. I read this thread yesterday, I'm thinking maybe a table router is the way to go.

    http://www.tdpri.com/forum/tele-home-depot/289335-$5-router-table.html

    I have a Bosch GKF600, so think it will work with this method. Do you think it's worth holding off hand routing it and building a diy table router instead? I don't want to bog up the routing.

    Thanks
     
  14. barbrainy

    barbrainy RIP

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    You'll find plenty of people (me included) who will recommend NOT routing body shape, due to risk of tear out, especially around the horns. Cutting close with a jigsaw, then using a belt sander is an easy and less risky option. (though leaves sanding the inner horns as a slightly trickier job)
     
  15. Southpaw Tele

    Southpaw Tele Friend of Leo's

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    As a science teacher in the US, I wish we used the metric (SI) system here. Just the fact that it's based on powers of ten makes it extremely easy to convert between units (like mg to kg). Get on board America! Okay, my nerd rant is over.
     
  16. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    I have a jigsaw. No belt sander unfortunately. I've read that routing is dodgy, but I don't have any workshop standard tools to do the job.

    I was planning on sanding with a squared block to get close then finish of with the router. I thought it would take yonks to sand to the line accurately. If I set-up a DIY router table, would I have more control around the horns?

    These arrived in the post this morning, so I'm going to foolishly ignore your advice and steam on ahead... I've gone for fairly small diameters, I can't remember if this means less tearout risk or more...

    Axcaliber Top bearing cutter - 1/4" shank: 9.5mm diameter: 19mm depth

    Wealden Bottom bearing cutter - 1/4" shank: 9.5mm diameter: 25mm depth
     

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  17. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

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    To be fair on America, we have plenty of examples of Imperial usage, roads being the main offender
     
  18. Arch Stanton

    Arch Stanton Tele-Meister

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    Canada went metric something like 30 years ago, but I'm still 6'3" tall :p
     
  19. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    Small bit diameter means more likely to tear out.

    Even routing, you should still do your best to cut as close to the line as you can before routing, less material less likely to tear out... but all bets are off when your doing the horn.

    I wish I could A.) work in my lounge/kitchen B.) Clean up before she gets home C.) Get the laundry done before she realizes I used her favorite top as a rag.

    Looking good!
     
  20. barbrainy

    barbrainy RIP

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    My reticence with router use (in general) is that by the time you are aware of a mistake or problem, it's usually too late. There is very little margin for error. Sanding is much less risky, and will usually cause less damage when you make a mistake (and it is when, not if.....as it is for all of us!) when it's a viable alternative.

    I can pretty much guarantee this won't be the last guitar you build, so a reasonable belt sander and random orbit sander (you could get reasonable ones from screwfix for forty quid each, with two year guarantees) will become necessary unless you REALLY like sanding stuff by hand.

    And repetitive strain injury....
     
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