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Teleacoustic Bridge Preparing For Liftoff

Discussion in 'Squier Tele Forum' started by BeegReeg, Jun 29, 2017.

  1. BeegReeg

    BeegReeg TDPRI Member

    15
    Jun 29, 2017
    Hawaii
    i just noticed that the butt end of the bridge is starting to pull away from the top. It's only about 1/32" (so far) and doesn't hurt the playability TOO much, but........ Given what this guitar is my first thought is to just mask the top and bridge, goosh a bit of a Gorilla glue in there, and clamp it down. Does anyone know if these bridges are also bolted to the top, or are they just glued down? Any other ideas?
     

  2. ebb soul

    ebb soul Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    57
    Jun 7, 2016
    Smyrna georgia
    Clamped with hide glue for 48 hrs?
    Gorilla expands some could get messy.
     
    Mechanic likes this.

  3. teledude1958

    teledude1958 TDPRI Member

    60
    Mar 23, 2017
    bradenton fla
    yea, gorilla glue expands into a foamy mess. use a needle to inject the glue down into where its needed
     

  4. S00NERMAN

    S00NERMAN Tele-Meister

    272
    Jan 7, 2016
    Pratt,KS
    Not being an expert and having just enough knowledge to be truly dangerous, I think the only proper way to fix that is to remove the bridge, make sure both surfaces are flat, clean and free of residual glue, and then glue and clamp back in place. I'm pretty sure Dan Erlewine covered a topic similar to this in one of the StewMac guitar repair videos on their website. Good luck with fixing it! :)
     

  5. xafinity

    xafinity Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Dec 24, 2015
    my Mom's basement
    Bridge Doctor
     
    jimash likes this.

  6. Ira7

    Ira7 Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    61
    Jan 8, 2008
    Coral Springs, FL
    They discontinued this guitar for a few reasons.

    You have a regular heavy Tele neck on a kind of flimsy body situation. Not flimsy really, but weird:

    A thin wood top mounted to whatever they call the fiberglass that makes up the rest of the body. This has to exert incredible stress on the bridge.

    I'm sure you can fix it, but remember that your neck is valuable. A real Tele neck.
     

  7. BeegReeg

    BeegReeg TDPRI Member

    15
    Jun 29, 2017
    Hawaii
    Thanks-- I've never used hide glue before, but am pretty adept with the gorilla. Do you need a hot pot and all the extras? I've also installed Bridge Dr's on a couple of guitars and ended up removing them. Will think on it for a bit. I have a feeling taking the whole bridge off might end badly.
     

  8. BeegReeg

    BeegReeg TDPRI Member

    15
    Jun 29, 2017
    Hawaii
    I see that TiteBond has a liquid hide glue. Would that work or do I have to go with hot glue?
     

  9. 4 Cat Slim

    4 Cat Slim Friend of Leo's

    Oct 17, 2012
    Nelson City TX
    It seems a shame that this guitar has been discontinued. I like the design, and the idea that I could use a good or
    comfortably shaped Tele neck on one.

    I would probably fix it by disconnecting and removing the saddle and pickup and removing the bridge as you would with a
    regular flat top guitar [the problem is that unless you're very careful, it's hard to perform the repair so it won't show].

    Okay, next very carefully score around the bridge with a sharp x-acto knife. You don't need to cut too deep, just enough to cut below the finish. Then, using a chisel and mallet, strike the bridge at a low angle. Ideally, the bridge will pop right off.
    Clean the bottom of the bridge (scrape off old traces of glue), then lightly score the top area where the bridge was removed.
    Once this is done, test fit everything and re-glue the bridge using clamps made for that purpose. Give it maybe two days to set, replace the pickup and saddle and re-string. There are probably YouTube videos or StewMac instructional videos that
    show how all of this is done.

    Alternately, I imagine that you could put small screws through the bridge, and washers and nuts to back them up on the inside,
    and use pearl or dark wood dots to cover the heads of the screws if the bridge is thick enough.

    I don't think I've ever seen a Telecoustic with the bridge completely pulled off.

    I would avoid Gorilla Glue, as I prefer Titebond.

    Good luck with any sort of repair you decide to undertake!
     
    jimash likes this.

  10. BeegReeg

    BeegReeg TDPRI Member

    15
    Jun 29, 2017
    Hawaii
    Thanks-- Are you talking regular Titebond or the Titebond Liquid Hide Glue? I, too, really like this guitar. People say they don't have much tone but to me they sound vaguely resophonic and are a perfect party/beach instrument. The brittle tone cuts right through a phalanx of Taylors or Takamines at a backyard BBQ and, with the fiberglass back/maple neck combo, I don't have worry about where I set it down or who might pick it up. Also it's very light, so if things devolve into a real battle of the bands it's easy to run with or even swing with abandon.
     

  11. 4 Cat Slim

    4 Cat Slim Friend of Leo's

    Oct 17, 2012
    Nelson City TX
    I use regular Titebond because it seems to me that you have a little more time to work with it.

    I like those Teleacoustics, too. I switch back and forth playing a Telecaster and an Ovation when I play in church,
    my shallow-bowl Ovation doesn't have the greatest acoustic tone, but I always play plugged in, and it's reliable.
    (The other guys in the group have a Taylor and a Martin)
    Seems to me if I had a Teleacoustic, I could leave the Ovation at home Sunday mornings.

    I hope you can get your Teleacoustic fixed, it sounds like it works for you.
     

  12. simond

    simond Tele-Meister

    367
    Dec 26, 2011
    Tasmania
    I use my Telecoustic in church through a little Trace Acoustic. Mine is an earlier one with a solid (not plywood) top so it feels kind of fragile so I'm not too hard on it.

    I saw one where the bridge had popped off. The dude cut a big hole in the plastic back and put a big centre block in there. Then he routed through the top and applied regular tele pickups, bridge, pickguard and control plate. Very frankenstein.
     

  13. BeegReeg

    BeegReeg TDPRI Member

    15
    Jun 29, 2017
    Hawaii
    Impatience got the best of me. I cranked the tension a bit to open up the split, masked it, scraped it out as best I could with an Xacto saw blade, slid a tiny bit of Gorilla Glue into the crack on an old credit card, & clamped it down. The ooze-out was minimal and it's cleaned up nicely. It it doesn't hold for the long haul I can do the whole proper Remove & Replace.
    IMG_2823.jpg IMG_2824.jpg IMG_2826.jpg
     
    trev333 likes this.

  14. BeegReeg

    BeegReeg TDPRI Member

    15
    Jun 29, 2017
    Hawaii
    That sounds very cool, tho I'm gonna see how my Gorilla Glue fix works. Another thought I had was, if everything goes totally haywire, cut away the top and make it a Tricone.
     

  15. trev333

    trev333 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    good job....:)

    I've glued down quite a few acoustic bridges with regular titebond thinned down a bit to soak right under... none of them have lifted since...

    one I put 2 screws/nuts/washers through to make it solid... a dab of black nail polish made them less noticeable...

    acoustic repair 2.jpg
     

  16. BeegReeg

    BeegReeg TDPRI Member

    15
    Jun 29, 2017
    Hawaii
    Did you have to take the whole bridge off to make sure you were glueing bare wood?
     

  17. trev333

    trev333 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    yeah, the wood was bare enough...:D

    often it's the top ply that gives way separating the veneers...


    acoustic repair 3.jpg
     

  18. Ira7

    Ira7 Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    61
    Jan 8, 2008
    Coral Springs, FL
    Aside from the Tele neck on these, I prefer the Talman TCY series of thin body AEs, in case anyone is considering going these route.

    All of these sound like nothing unplugged, and the piezos are just bad. They don't sound acoustic, unless you go crazy with the processing. The Talmans except for one model are no great shakes either in the electronics department, but they're just more natural feeling, acoustic feeling, guitars to play.
     

  19. BeegReeg

    BeegReeg TDPRI Member

    15
    Jun 29, 2017
    Hawaii
    I'm liking the durability of the fiberglass back/maple neck. I take it parties/the beach etc and don't worry where I set it down or who picks it up. To me the unplugged sound is vaguely resophonic, so I try to channel that, and plugged its nice and squanky bright, which isn't necessarily a bad thing for my solo Bar gigs where I'm competing with trolled iPhones and half a dozen flat screen TVs. I use a "BodyRez" box going into the PA which helps the piezo quack a lot.
     

  20. Ira7

    Ira7 Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    61
    Jan 8, 2008
    Coral Springs, FL
    I just have a real problem with piezos in general, so yes, I'm biased in that way.

    If I want an acoustic sound, I would rather stick a passive soundhole pickup in ANY AE with inferior piezos/electronics than use what's on board.

    They all stink.
     

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