Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups darrenriley.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Tapped or split HB's?

Discussion in 'Just Pickups' started by cottonmike, Jan 13, 2019.

  1. cottonmike

    cottonmike TDPRI Member

    Age:
    60
    82
    Aug 1, 2018
    AZ
    Does a HB that is wired to split or to be tapped in any way have a compromised signal path that may affect the sound, while in HB mode?
     
  2. rigatele

    rigatele Tele-Afflicted

    Apr 20, 2014
    Canada
    Not when it's done in the usual way.
     
  3. Rob DiStefano

    Rob DiStefano Poster Extraordinaire Vendor Member

    Age:
    73
    Mar 3, 2003
    NJ via TX
    depends on what you mean by "wired to be split or tapped".

    humbuckers with three coil leads are typically meant to be split, meaning one coil is grounded out and dead, which means only one coil is creating a signal, which will be Significantly different than when two coils are sensing string vibrations.

    there is no "tap" for a twin coil pickup - taps are for single coil pickups, which is one coil and two or more voices.

    humbuckers that have four coil leads (a pair for each coil) can be externally switch manipulated to be split, joined in parallel, phased, or left in their original series wiring. all of the resulting wiring variations will yield varying tones and outputs.
     
  4. sleazy pot pie

    sleazy pot pie Tele-Holic

    936
    May 31, 2014
    austin
    how would you describe the sound of parallel , out of phase , and series.

    I made an esquire using a 4 wire Humbucker and I couldn’t tell much if any difference between series and parallel. I haven’t tried out of phase
     
  5. Rob DiStefano

    Rob DiStefano Poster Extraordinaire Vendor Member

    Age:
    73
    Mar 3, 2003
    NJ via TX
    LOTS has to do with the pickup, what kinda circuit it's wired into, what volumes yer playing at, and what/if any modulation is used. not to mention the amp. there SHOULD be differences in tone AND output for the different coil configurations.

    two coils in series yields the most output and midrange. two coils in parallel (like a typical tele circuit) has less output and more treble. out-of-phase is a one-trick pony that's easy to spot.
     
  6. Antigua Tele

    Antigua Tele Friend of Leo's

    Jun 2, 2014
    west coast
    I know this isn't exactly what you asked, but sorta, and interesting difference between that "4 counductor" cable and vintage braided hookup wire is that, since there is a run of wire that connects the two coils traveling the length of the shielded 4 conductor wire, it capacitively couples with the shielding along that length, however long it is. So if the pickup features 4 conductor cable, it's as though there is a low value capacitor, maybe 100pF, going to ground in between the coils. It doesn't have much if any effect on the tone, because the value is so low, but if you're thinking there has to be some sort of consequence for using a different hookup cable type, there's that.
     
  7. Antigua Tele

    Antigua Tele Friend of Leo's

    Jun 2, 2014
    west coast
    The Seymour Duncan Triple Shot ring does it all, so if you watch some demos of it, you will hear all these sounds



    Here's how I'd put it; series=loud, mids. parallel = scooped, bright. split = true single coil tones. out of phase "OOP", guitar sounds like a cheap tin can.

    If you want to hear one of the rare instance of OOP pickup sounds in a pop song, Prince used it here

     
    Bruxist, kingvox and sleazy pot pie like this.
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.