Swirls or scratches in tru oil

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by domanation, Feb 19, 2019.

  1. domanation

    domanation TDPRI Member

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    https://flic.kr/p/2eKVkcY[​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I’m at a bit of a loss. Every time I wet sand I end up with these darkish swirl marks that I can’t even see until I put another coat of tru oil on. It was building nicely and I wet sanded with 1000 and put thinned our coats on only to find these. So I wet sanded with 600 unroll they went away put another coat in and they are back. Any clue how to approach this?

    Thanks this place is a wealth of information.
     

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    Last edited: Feb 19, 2019
  2. eallen

    eallen Tele-Afflicted

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    My 1st go to when something looks like this is either sanding before it is fully hardened or you aren't getting the marks sanded out from previous grits.

    Eric

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  3. Matthias

    Matthias Tele-Afflicted

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    Dirty sandpaper too... I have a bad habit of not cleaning the paper or surface enough when I’m wet sanding and end up scratching the surface with debris, which can get caught, especially if you sand too soon as eallen says.
     
    Chunkocaster and eallen like this.
  4. jimgchord

    jimgchord Tele-Holic

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    Dirty paper
     
  5. domanation

    domanation TDPRI Member

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    Yeah I thought that might be the case. Is the fix sanding back with like 320 to get them out?
     
  6. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    It has very low abrasion resistance and the film build is the lowest of anything I can recall, as it's not really a "coating. It's being used as one - but that's not the product design intent nor a strength. It builds a small fraction of the thickness of lacquer, polyurethane; shellac, varnish etc.

    IMO the problem is wet sanding it at all. Apply it and leave it alone, or use a non-wax, non-silicone, buffing type polish like StewMac's Preservation - and with nothing but a clean, soft, cotton cloth.

    ALL wet sanding creates swirl marks - lacquer, when applied well needs no wet sanding, just buffing - eliminating the wet sanding is a huge advantage.
     
  7. lammie200

    lammie200 Tele-Afflicted

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    I think that you might have to buff it with rubbing compound between coats if you want that urethane gloss look.
     
  8. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Friend of Leo's

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    I use micro mesh and wet sand between the final coats. Never had a problem. Can't remember the grits but I work through about half of the stew mac pads excluding the most course grit and the extremely fine grits.
     
  9. RolandG

    RolandG TDPRI Member

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