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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Studio monitors.. help me decide

Discussion in 'Modeling Amps, Plugins and Apps' started by puddin, Jun 2, 2017.

  1. hippietim

    hippietim Friend of Leo's

    Mar 17, 2003
    Raleigh
    I've done this a few times. The last time I went monitor shopping I wanted to be done. So I checked a ton of them. Early in my search I checked out some Genelecs. Nothing I tried could touch them. They were expensive but I'm done.

    FWIW, I bought my son those JBLs and they are very good speakers. For listening to music. They are adequate as monitors but they are nowhere near the Adams, Genelecs, Etc.

    If you want great computer speakers, the JBLs are a good choice. But if you are serious about recording and mixing, there are much better options.
     

  2. puddin

    puddin Tele-Meister

    331
    Apr 14, 2010
    Punta Gorda, florida
    Thanks hippietim. Question? I'm not interested in recording or mixing. All I want to do.. is plug my guitar into my computer, and download some good software and sale my amp. Downsizing to apartment or condo. Will my guitars sound good through the JBL's or should I upgrade to something better. thank's
     

  3. Felino

    Felino Tele-Meister

    356
    Apr 28, 2016
    Belgrade
    I hope your setup's latency (time from plucking the string to hear the note thruogh the speakers) will be low enough.

    I think that your guitar will sound good through any decent monitors, including JBLs.
     
    puddin likes this.

  4. puddin

    puddin Tele-Meister

    331
    Apr 14, 2010
    Punta Gorda, florida
    Thank you Felino.. This is all new to me.. my setup latency.. no sure.. please educate me. Thank's
     

  5. GuitarsFromMars

    GuitarsFromMars TDPRI Member

    Age:
    61
    56
    Apr 15, 2017
    ...playing in traffic
    I have a set/pair of Equator D5's 1st gen. speakers. They took some playback before they were 'broken in', but they are the nicest set of monitors, I have used, in an untreated room. I did not have the funding to create the kind of wall surfaces I needed, to create proper room treatment for playback(renter), so I bought the best sounding nearfield monitors I could find. Ted Kefalo who designed these (and founded KEF Audio), told me mixing would no longer be so difficult in an untreated room. The speakers sort of have the quality of an NS-10 monitor. I like working with them. I am a Crown/JBL guy when it comes to passive speakers(4311's) for soffit mount, but for nearfields with a sufficient soundstage, please mark me as impressed by the Equators for guitar-centric music. If you need additional low end (below 53 Hz), you may want the D8's in a bigger/treated room. I won't use a sub-woofer.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2017

  6. hippietim

    hippietim Friend of Leo's

    Mar 17, 2003
    Raleigh
    You still want something just as good and you really don't want something that is going to exaggerate highs and lows - particularly with just guitar.

    Personally, I would still go with some Genelecs or Adams. In fact, I'm doing something similar in my bedroom and I'm planning on picking up a pair of Genelec 8020D monitors - this is the latest version which includes a "desktop" setting which adjusts the bass response for this mode.

    I know a some folks are using the Presonus S or R series monitors as well for this sort of thing.


    As for latency using a computer for your tones, you need to think through what your signal chain is.

    1) You're plugging into your computer somehow. This is some sort of audio input. In order to process your guitar's input with the computer software, the signal needs to be converted from your analog input into a digital signal. This is typically about 1ms.

    2) Then there's whatever processing time is required by the OS and your software to process the incoming guitar signal into the modeled amp and effects you configure. Even with fast modern CPUs it's another millisecond to several milliseconds depending on what you setup.

    3) Then the signal needs to be converted back to analog to go to your speakers. That's another millisecond.

    So you should figure at least 3 milliseconds but it'll probably be more. To get a sense of what that means, it's roughly 1 millisecond of latency per foot you're away from your speaker. So 10 feet is like 10 milliseconds. A lot of people can start to feel that. Pretty much everyone can feel the disconnect at 20 feet or more.

    The most important thing to get is a high quality audio interface. The sound card in your computer is not going to cut it for multiple reasons. Typically, the latency is worse than a high quality card because they use cheap convertors and other shortcuts. The other thing is a lot of them are super noisy with a low level signal like a guitar.

    The biggest headache with audio interfaces is driver quality. Holy crap these things can suck! I've had 100% reliability with RME interfaces - they are widely regarded as having the most stable drivers out there. This is no BS - I've never had them crash. A used Babyface would be outstanding. Otherwise, Presonus stuff has been very good for me as well. I've heard good things about Focusrite as well. Avoid the Line 6 interfaces, I've had a couple of them and they're not very good.
     
    puddin likes this.

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