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String trees

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by bigben55, Jun 16, 2018.

  1. bigben55

    bigben55 Friend of Leo's

    May 19, 2010
    Cincinnati, OH
    Or whatever they're called. Most teles have one on the headstock for the B and high E strings. But, some have 2, one for the D and G string as well. Why is that?

    I have an ever so slight buzz at the open G that goes away when I push down on the string behind the nut. I also have locking tuners so I can't wind the string down lower on the post. Any reason not to add another string tree?
     

  2. acrylicsuperman

    acrylicsuperman Tele-Holic

    926
    Nov 17, 2010
    Arizona
    If it solves the problem, i'd add one.
     
    nojazzhere and PhredE like this.

  3. bigben55

    bigben55 Friend of Leo's

    May 19, 2010
    Cincinnati, OH
    Is there any fit and functional difference between strat and tele string trees? The bent metal ones? The guitar had a black Tusq one now, but I just assume buy 2 chrome Fender ones.
     

  4. acrylicsuperman

    acrylicsuperman Tele-Holic

    926
    Nov 17, 2010
    Arizona
    While there are a few different styles out there, they all function the same.
     
    nojazzhere likes this.

  5. 8barlouie

    8barlouie Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Age:
    59
    May 9, 2015
    Seekonk, MA
    It sounds like your nut might be cut wrong on the third string. That would cause the string to buzz when played open. Most likely, it’s cut too deep and it’s buzzing on the first fret. When the angle from the nut to the tuner is too shallow, IME it causes the string to sound weak or generally not ring true, but not buzz.
     
    acrylicsuperman likes this.

  6. David Barnett

    David Barnett Poster Extraordinaire

    I remember when I first got my '66 Telecaster, it still had its original nut which was probably cut for 0.012 - 0.056 strings, and strung with a 0.010 set the 3rd string would often pop out of the nut slot.

    Fender started adding a 2nd string tree to guitars in the early 1970s, and I wonder if that coincides with shipping the guitars with thinner strings than they came with in the '50s and '60s, but still cutting nuts the same way they always did?
     

  7. tessting1two

    tessting1two Tele-Meister

    373
    Apr 13, 2014
    Southern California
    If your locking tuners have staggered posts you shouldn't need a string tree. Is this buzzing at the nut a new problem? Perhaps a bad string or the wearing down of one of the slots? I'd me more inclined to fix/replace the nut than drill holes in the headstock. One of my teles has 2 string trees and I put locking tuners with staggered posts on it and ran the strings over the string trees with no issues. The point being that the staggered posts provide sufficient break angle without the use of string trees provided the nut is cut properly.
     

  8. bigben55

    bigben55 Friend of Leo's

    May 19, 2010
    Cincinnati, OH
    Doesn't buzz at the 1st fret, just open G.

    How do you tell if the tuner posts are staggered? I don't think they are. The nut could be cut wrong, but adding a string tree is way cheaper than a new nut. It's a partscaster btw, albeit a really nice one. I don't mind drilling another hole.
     
    8barlouie likes this.

  9. 8barlouie

    8barlouie Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Age:
    59
    May 9, 2015
    Seekonk, MA
    I’ll clarify. I meant that the open string will buzz against the first fret if the nut is cut too deep.
     

  10. tessting1two

    tessting1two Tele-Meister

    373
    Apr 13, 2014
    Southern California
    If the posts are staggered the E/A posts are tallest ,the D/G posts are medium and the B/E posts are short.
     

  11. strat a various

    strat a various Friend of Leo's

    May 9, 2008
    Texas
    My P-Bass G string buzzes sitar-style unless it's under the retainer disk, which is basically a big string tree. The nut is fine, it's just the nature of Fender headstocks with that "no angle" geometry. Some guitars need two trees.
     
    PhredE likes this.

  12. bigben55

    bigben55 Friend of Leo's

    May 19, 2010
    Cincinnati, OH
    I bought a 2 pack of the little round ones, won't work. Not tall enough. Who makes significantly taller string trees?
     

  13. strat a various

    strat a various Friend of Leo's

    May 9, 2008
    Texas
    They are supposed to be low, so the strings are under downward tension after the nut. Maybe a longer screw and a couple rubber washers would help?
     
    nojazzhere likes this.

  14. LutherBurger

    LutherBurger Friend of Leo's

    Oct 29, 2013
    NYC
    I've never used those. Will the screw fit through a string's ball end? If so, you can probably use one as a spacer.
     

  15. strat a various

    strat a various Friend of Leo's

    May 9, 2008
    Texas
    Need a bigger spacer. Saw through an old ballpoint pen barrel with a hack-saw and make the tree any height you need.
     
    bigben55 and LutherBurger like this.

  16. tessting1two

    tessting1two Tele-Meister

    373
    Apr 13, 2014
    Southern California
    For tall string trees, I think the ones that come on Fender Am. Standards work very well:

    [​IMG]

    If you're a purist, you go with the vintage strat stamped steel that has a bushing to raise the height:

    [​IMG]
     

  17. TimTam

    TimTam Tele-Meister

    393
    Jun 4, 2010
    Melbourne
    There are roller style trees on ebay that are tall too.

    Note that the Am Standard style ones have a small pin underneath that goes into the wood for stability. So you need an extra hole in addition to the screw hole.

    Re the classic style, there is a school of thought that these can catch strings and lead to tuning problems, esp with trems.
     
    asnarski likes this.

  18. jrblue

    jrblue Tele-Holic

    543
    Nov 14, 2010
    Santa Barbara
    I don't like string trees -- I hate extra parts! -- but I find myself adding them all the time, even with staggered tuner posts, to get a good break angle behind the nut. They virtually always make a mechanical, and sometimes sonic, improvement. In order to avoid the "chintzy gizmo" look, I often make my own trees out of bone.
     

  19. strat a various

    strat a various Friend of Leo's

    May 9, 2008
    Texas
    I've used heavy staples
     

  20. FrankHenderson

    FrankHenderson NEW MEMBER!

    Age:
    29
    1
    Aug 3, 2018
    nashville tn
    IMG_1946.jpg
    If you want downward pressure on the G string but don't want to drill another hole or have a string tree on the D string you should get one of these Three Trees from Music City Bridge. https://reverb.com/item/10857966-th...r-nickel-by-music-city-bridge-polished-nickel
     
    old wrench likes this.

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