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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Stock model similar to Campilongo custom shop?

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by matrix, Aug 11, 2017.

  1. matrix

    matrix TDPRI Member

    Age:
    47
    93
    Apr 13, 2016
    Vancouver, BC
    So, after seeing the man play live, I have developed an unhealthy obsession with his playing style. I know the custom shop did a 50 guitar run, imitating his famous '59, but the price and availability make those out of reach (never mind that they belong with better guitarists than I).

    But I am wondering if there are any stock models out there that can get me part way there. Especially with regards to the drop-off behind the nut (for those behind the nut bends), and the responsiveness on the tone and volume knob sweep. Colors and aesthetic differences not such a big deal.

    (sorry if there have been threads on this in the past...nothing turned up in my search).

    Thanks!
     

  2. Striker6

    Striker6 TDPRI Member

    63
    Nov 25, 2015
    New Jersey
    I'm a big JC fan and recently purchased an American Vintage Reissue '58 Tele in Aged White Blond. I think this is the closest stock guitar. You could swap the bridge plate for a top loader if you really wanted to mimic his guitar but I find it very similar to his sound stock. I did have a local guitar tech install a spacer on the string tree to elevate it for better behind the nut bending. The '58's have a different string tree then the '52 and it is low to the headstock. I had some binding at the nut do to the increased break angle as well. The spacer has cleared it all up.

    Also, keep in mind that a lot of his tone comes from his Princeton Reverb amps as well. I have a '65 Princeton Reverb Reissue and swapped the stock Jensen speaker for a Celestion G10 Vintage (which Jim uses). I'm well within the ballpark with this setup... I've also started taking lessons (downloads and Skype) from Jim. I think he may have thought I had one of his Custom Shop Guitars when we started because it looks and sounds so similar.
     

    Attached Files:


  3. SonsOfMoog

    SonsOfMoog Tele-Meister

    Age:
    31
    137
    Jul 22, 2017
    US
    Great advice, I've been itching to get a similar set up.
     

  4. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Telefied Ad Free Member

    No, there's really been no other thread quite like this, or none I can recall.

    I can tell you the Eric Johnson Signature Strats have a headstock where the plane of it we see is more recessed by maybe 3/16ths inches than an ordinary Strat neck. But fitting a Strat neck to a stock Tele body is kinda ugly.

    Maybe you could find a T neck you like that's kinda disposable and have a woodworker remove that top 3/16ths of an inch, off the face of the headstock.

    Remember, when you convert a string through to top loader, those windings that hold the ball end extend up the string an awful long way. Unless you can find some strings that don't extend so far, it is easy to have those bundles of wire way too close (even on!) the E-A barrel. I've been doing half bridges, and skootching the lower half lower down the face of the body. It gets more of that spongy, slinky feel to the strings that Mr. Campilongo likes to mention as preferable, and it creates distance from the ball end to the saddle.
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2017

  5. matrix

    matrix TDPRI Member

    Age:
    47
    93
    Apr 13, 2016
    Vancouver, BC
    Thanks all...Boris, if I was to go that route, do you think I would be better off getting a relatively cheap tele, and modding it as I go? Move the bridge down, mod a neck, maybe rewire?

    I guess what I am thinking is take something like a Fender Squier Classic Vibe 50s Tele, rather than mess with a more expensive model?
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2017
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  6. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Apr 2, 2014
    Phoenix, AZ

  7. warrent

    warrent Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

    281
    Sep 15, 2009
    toronto
    you could try the squier series fender tele. Its already a top loader (6 barrel though) and there is enough room behind the nut for bends. It doesn't have the treble bleed circuit and given how cheap they are you have room for pick up choices without breaking the bank.
     

  8. bottlenecker

    bottlenecker Tele-Afflicted

    Dec 6, 2015
    Wisconsin
    I've heard of this issue with top loaders before. It seems like an easy fix with a little machined spacer block behind the bridge with six holes in it. Too me that seems more appealing than moving the bridge. How much of a spacer would've solved the problem when you've experienced it, and do you think this is something top loader fans would be aesthetically averse to?
     

  9. Wicked-T

    Wicked-T Tele-Meister

    Age:
    47
    282
    Apr 1, 2017
    USA
    I just purchased a 1994 Fender Squier series top loader, it's in great condition and
    the price was right too!
     

  10. Tony Forman

    Tony Forman Tele-Meister

    The USA James Burton Telecaster has a similar deep scoop behind the nut. I've heard that the now discontinued two pickup Burton Standard had the same neck as the USA model. You might want to look at picking up a used Burton Standard and using it as a platform to mod.
     

  11. geetarLAXjunkie

    geetarLAXjunkie TDPRI Member

    17
    Sep 4, 2017
    KC
    I built a Campy inspired budget-Tele last year. It's a 2003 Fender Classic Series '50s Telecaster with Curtis Novak PUPs (Tel-V Neck and Tel-V Bridge custom wound to Jim's specs), with a Glendale top-loader double-cut bridge and threaded saddles.

    Campy Tele.jpg

    Two things immediately jump out:

    1. The top-loader bridge, when paired with 9s (what Jim uses), really does make the strings feel more rubbery. I'm "digging in" with my pick more than usual, because it simply wants to be played that way.

    2. I've spent 99% of my lifetime playing exclusively the neck PUP on all my guitars, but the Novak bridge PUP is so well balanced that it's already getting half of my attention. I have and love Fender Nocasters, Lollar and Kinman PUPs, but the Novaks really are something different. I'm loving them.​

    I showed the guitar off at Jim's website last year, and his response was "that photo sounds good!"
     
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  12. matrix

    matrix TDPRI Member

    Age:
    47
    93
    Apr 13, 2016
    Vancouver, BC
    Oh this is soooo cool. That is a brilliant set up and with a not-quite-so-spendy starting point. This is what I was hoping to see when I started the thread. Awesome! Thanks for sharing that.
     

  13. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Age:
    60
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    I'm a fan of Jim's playing. I wasn't trying to copy him, though. I just happen to like whiteguards...

    My AV58 seems very close to his guitar, but probably with a slightly thicker neck. He always says how near the nut his feels like "an old lady's wrist". Sorry, that's not a bonus in my book :)

    I like Rutters hardware, so I had Marc make me a vintage style bridge plate (stamped), but with the treble lip cut half back, and top-loader holes drilled. I paired it with his super nice 5/16" cold rolled steel Broadcaster saddles.

    Weight is 6.75 lbs, finish couldn't be any thinner, and it sounds pretty nice.

    At the time of these pics, I had reworked the wiring to some fun-to-design scheme that I didn't use much. Hence the mini-toggle. Now gone.

    Also, the stock pickups are nice, but not different enough from the AV64 set in that guitar. And overall I like my AV64 better. So the 58s are on the shelf for now, and I'm playing Fred Stuart Blackguards in the AV58. A3 magnets, lovely sounding pickups. More 3D-sounding, and not as "wiry" as the stock pickups. Those tone words probably don't do much for anyone but me... Bottom line, the guitar now has a distinct identity, and on par with the 64. My only two remaining Telecasters.


    _whole in case.JPG rear bridge - toploader.JPG
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2017
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  14. matrix

    matrix TDPRI Member

    Age:
    47
    93
    Apr 13, 2016
    Vancouver, BC
    Oh man is that a nice looking guitar!!!
     
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  15. ruger9

    ruger9 Poster Extraordinaire

    Dec 31, 2004
    Hackettstown, NJ
    Just an FYI, not so much regarding his guitar as his TONE...

    A big part of getting his tone is, he plays those PRs CRANKED. Literally- vol 10, bass 10, treble 6-7... then control all clean/dirty duties from his guitar's volume knob. And he doesn't do "treble bleeds" or any fancy wiring either...

    from Jim:

    "The wiring I prefer has no bells and whistles and allows the player to manually dial in treble (and volume). The wiring I prefer is called "Late '67 TELE wiring". This leads me to believe that this Tele wiring combo started in "late 67" My belief is that this "Late '67 TELE wiring " is no longer "stock"... either way, check your wiring people. I think this "tone boost" feature is a real hindrance to personal tone choices and guitar control (in my humble opinion)
    To eliminate the "tone boost," one need only to clip the .01 capacitor that connects the first and second lug on the volume pot of a "standard" Tele."
     
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  16. Lobomov

    Lobomov Friend of Leo's

    Jul 15, 2013
    Europa
    Most of the time Jim plays his '59 and I doubt that it has a scooped headstock, so does it really matter? :)
     

  17. ruger9

    ruger9 Poster Extraordinaire

    Dec 31, 2004
    Hackettstown, NJ
    Actually, for whatever reason, I think his does. He has talked about it in interviews before. Maybe just whoever made the neck that day (happy accident)
     

  18. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Age:
    60
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    How scooped are we talking about? They're all scooped to some degree, no? Just a steeper angle off the nut? Anything else would require a thinner headstock.

    Can you see the scoop in my AV58 above?
     

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