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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

sticky poly neck

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by big jimmy, Aug 8, 2006.

  1. big jimmy

    big jimmy Tele-Holic

    Age:
    57
    911
    Feb 10, 2004
    Melvis, TN.
    My son has a epiphone elite sg. It has the poly finish on it and that really slows him down so much that i can't my hw1 tele away from him. Says its easier to play. Especially in the summer. Any suggestions to cure this. It is a very nice finish on the guitar and not sure if i want to put the steel wool or schotch brite to it. :?:
     

  2. tiktok

    tiktok Poster Extraordinaire

    Jan 11, 2005
    Seattle
    1. Keep the guitar neck clean.
    2. Have him wash his hands before he plays.
     

  3. GUITARmole

    GUITARmole Tele-Afflicted

    Mar 13, 2005
    Portland, OR
    Gerlitz No.1 carnauba wax (or Mother's non-cleaner pure carnauba car wax).
     

  4. Pete Galati

    Pete Galati R.I.P.

    Mar 25, 2006
    I have an Epi Elitist SG. I got it a couple years ago. Nice craftsmanship, and great MOP inlays on the fingerboard.

    It had the same problem with a sticky neck, and washing my hands helped, but didn't solve anything.

    On that one, I sanded the back of the neck with a fine sand paper. Just enough to get rid of the gloss.

    I wouldn't recommend using sandpaper, but it did fix the problem. I did it around the time I figured out that I was sticking to most glossy guitar necks. Fine steelwool is less drastic. I've used 0000 steelwool to buff new Tele necks. It doesn't rough the finish up as much, but helps get rid of the gloss. Either way, you have to be cautious, and not rub exuberantly.
     

  5. yerffej

    yerffej Tele-Meister

    300
    Aug 6, 2006
    canada
    I had a very similar problem with my epiphone Lp. I told my tech about it as I was bringing my guitar in to be set up. It was such a small job that he didnt charge me even. he said he used progressively finer grades of steel wool to get that sort of "matte" finish. It REALLY helped a lot, problem is gone completely
     

  6. bprogecene

    bprogecene TDPRI Member

    23
    Jun 29, 2003
    Thurmont, MD
    I've used a Scotch Brite pad also instead of steel wool. Seems to work well.
     
    Chicago Matt likes this.

  7. GUITARmole

    GUITARmole Tele-Afflicted

    Mar 13, 2005
    Portland, OR
    Umm...he said he didn't want to put steel wool or scotchbrite to it!

    Try my advice above BEFORE the steel wool or scotchbrite. It might just work for you.
     

  8. big jimmy

    big jimmy Tele-Holic

    Age:
    57
    911
    Feb 10, 2004
    Melvis, TN.
    After some thinking, I did the scotchbrite thing. It did the job. Did not want to have to wax it all the time and while it a great guitar with A+ workmanship it will never be a vintage or collectable. Son loves it. Now I can get my guitar back.
     
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  9. big jimmy

    big jimmy Tele-Holic

    Age:
    57
    911
    Feb 10, 2004
    Melvis, TN.
    And by the way he says he likes the satin look better anyhow!
     
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  10. Ajtele

    Ajtele TDPRI Member

    Age:
    64
    22
    Apr 17, 2016
    Columbia, SC
    Are there different grades of scotchbrite pads ? Don't want to get one that's too coarse for the job...thanks!
     

  11. BryMelvin

    BryMelvin Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    65
    Jan 4, 2014
    Arivaca AZ
    With any poly even satin poly you are going to polish it gloss again if you play enough for it to even matter.

    I have a six month old AJ220S which CAME with satin neck which is now gloss from summer Friday night acoustic jams.

    Bring something to dry your hand. Baby powder will do.
     

  12. Chicago Matt

    Chicago Matt Tele-Afflicted

    Aug 23, 2014
    Woodstock
    I can't stand a sticky neck. Love my Road Worn necks. But for the others:

    I like the gray ultra fine scotchbrite for this purpose. It's equivalent to 0000 - 000 steel wool, but you don't have to worry about magnetic residue getting where you don't want it i.e. pickups! It doesn't take much. The gloss will come back with playing so you have to redo it once in awhile depending on how much you play.

    I got this from another forum site:

    4/0 steel wool = 400 grit sandpaper
    3/0 steel wool = 280 grit
    2/0 steel wool = 180 grit
    2/0 steel wool = 120 grit
    1 steel wool = 100 grit
    2 steel wool = 60 grit
    3 steel wool = 50 grit
    4 steel wool = 36 grit

    Anticipating the next question:

    White Scotchbrite = 1200 grit (it has no abrasive)
    Gray Scotchbrite = about 400 - 600
    Maroon Scotchbrite = about 220-280
    Green Scotchbrite = about 150 - 180

    Be a little careful. Different manufacturers of non-woven abrasive material may be somewhat different.

    The above is for 3M Scotch-Brite brand.

    By the way, cleaning any accumulated gunk with Naphtha helps too.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2017
    Ajtele and Vespa_One like this.

  13. Ajtele

    Ajtele TDPRI Member

    Age:
    64
    22
    Apr 17, 2016
    Columbia, SC
    Thank you very much!
     
    Chicago Matt likes this.

  14. Guran

    Guran Friend of Leo's

    Mar 20, 2007
    Sweden
    That's true, but... I have two poly necks that were satin, but after 10 resp. 15 years they are polished to gloss from use. They are not sticky though.

    I have an old Aria Pro II that was extremely sticky. Some time ca 1990 I sanded it. It is now very gloss but not sticky at all.

    I have recently started to think that stickyness might be a property of the very surface that has dried to gloss. That once you have gotten rid of that very surface the problem is gone. As I said in another thread about sticky necks, It would be an interesting experiment to take a sticky neck, sand it and then buff it to high gloss again and see if it's sticky or not.
     

  15. Dismalhead

    Dismalhead Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    54
    Feb 16, 2014
    Auburn, California
    I've sanded a few necks down to bare wood, polished them with super fine sandpaper, sprayed them with a single light coat of clear satin poly, and then fine sanded them again to make the smooth as silk. If it's not a high end guitar I say sand away. It's a tool to make music; if it's gonna make it more playable, do it.
     
    JuneauMike likes this.

  16. screamin eagle

    screamin eagle Friend of Leo's

    Oct 9, 2008
    S. CA
    Scotchbrite has always worked for me.
     

  17. charlie chitlin

    charlie chitlin Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Age:
    55
    Mar 17, 2003
    Spring City, Pa
    The thing about scuffing it with ScotchBrite is, it's totally reversible with a little rubbing compound, swirl remover or hand glaze.
    Many don't realize how non-invasive it is.
    Takes about 30 seconds to do and about 10 minutes to un-do.
     
    JuneauMike likes this.

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