Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Step by Step Walkthrough

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by westaman, Jun 15, 2010.

  1. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    this neck is looking further and further away... :(

    I was hoping to have the pickups ordered by christmas, which would have been my last purchase. At this rate, I'll be lucky to have purchased the neck by christmas!!!
     

  2. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    Having a hard time not compromising on the specs I want (slight flame in neck, actual clay dots) just so I can go ahead order my neck....


    Been said before, waiting is the hardest part!
     

  3. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    I'm going to wetsand/finesse it at the end of this month. Does any one suggest either waxing or using perfect it afterwards, or should finesse it be enough?

    How do you buff the edges/contours with an electric polisher?
     

  4. Bud Veazey

    Bud Veazey Tele-Holic

    741
    Aug 3, 2010
    Lawrenceville, GA
    You have already received a lot of good advice. Here's my 2-cents worth based on building a couple dozen Teles. First, drill all your holes and dry fit all the parts--neck, bridge, pickguard, jackplate, etc. before you even touch your spray gun/can. This will save you a lot of heartache.
    If you have a pretty piece of wood, alder, swamp ash, curly maple, etc. go with a clear coat or lightly tinted color. The posters who told you that dark colors are more difficult are correct. Clear coat and light tints are much more forgiving.
    If you plan to build many guitars, go ahead and invest in an HVLP spray gun. You can buy complete units for $150. If you already have a decent compressor, you can buy the gun for under $50. If you don't know whether this will be your first and last guitar, I suggest buying Nitrocellulose lacquer from Reranch (http://www.reranch.com) or using aerosol Behlen's stringed instrument lacquer. You can find Behlen products at Klingspor (http://www.workingshop.com). Behlen lacquer requires their vinyl sealer for optimal finish.
    Finally, prep, prep, prep. Every minute you spend sanding, sealing and sanding again is an hour saved on the other end.
    By the way, acrylic lacquers like Krylon work, but not as well as nitro. The upside of acrylic lacquer is it's cheap and readily available. DO NOT use spray enamel. Someone mentioned Deft. Deft is nitrocellulose, but I wouldn't recommend trying to use Deft brushing lacquer in a sprayer. The aerosol should be okay. Someone also mentioned Rustoleum. I may be wrong, but I believe that's an enamel based paint. Check the label. Good luck with your project.
    One more thing...buy a respirator. The cloth masks are not good enough. Unless you're working outside, set up a fan to exhaust air from your painting area out a door or window. All the advice you got on humidity is right on. It's usually best not to spray or a really humid day. If you can't resist painting when it's humid, get some blush remover from your lacquer supplier. You'll need it.
     

  5. Aronkovacs

    Aronkovacs TDPRI Member

    91
    Jun 1, 2009
    USA Fairfield CT
    what about poplar? I am making a mustang, and I need some advice. If I would use krylon and nitro overcoat, what should I use as a primer? do I have to sand it? It I tint the wood, then the correct order is:sand=>seal=>stain=>nitro finish? I have thousands of questions like this, this is my first build, so I need help please!
     

  6. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    Picked up some extra work... may be ordering my neck soon!!!!

    Stay tuned
     

  7. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    2 questions before I order/start my neck:

    1. Is there any other way to drill the pin holes for schaller tuners without paying $37+shipping for StewMac's jig?

    2. Is it necessary to drill the tuner peg holes in the back of the neck before finishing it? I ask because I have what I need to buy the neck and clear/amber. I don't want to put the $40 into the jig right this second if I don't have to. I didn't drill any of my pickguard holes yet, and all I'm waiting to do is wetsand/polish my body.

    Just to clarify I'm referring to the 2 pegs on the back of the neck for Schaller Elite tuners.

    Thanks for your help guys.
     

  8. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    any help would be much appreciated!!!!!
     

  9. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

    Jun 29, 2009
    USA
    I think the issue may be that you're thread is transitioning to more of a build thread than one on finishing. Maybe post or poke around in Tele Home Depot forum...lots of builders in there.

    Peace,
    Mark
     

  10. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    Thanks, yeah it was initially about just finishing, but now its come to all aspects of finishing and building.
     

  11. Aronkovacs

    Aronkovacs TDPRI Member

    91
    Jun 1, 2009
    USA Fairfield CT

    I read the rustoleum site saying that their spray is acrylic based. Many companies wanna cut back on nitro due to health regulations
     

  12. spook777

    spook777 Tele-Meister

    194
    Apr 21, 2008
    San Diego, CA
    1. If these are like sperzels, put the tuner in, and then push on it to dent the maple. Use calipers to measure drill thickness and depth and then drill. This is assuming you line them up perfectly. Otherwise practice on cardboard to get them straight and then use the cardboard as a template. The template from Stew-Mac I've wanted for a while because its more accurate than the way I do it and will guarantee a perpendicular hole.

    2. I've always installed Sperzels on finished necks. The downside to what you are asking is the possibility of cracking the clear coat near the hole if you drill after. But usually the pin hole is covered by the rest of the tuner so I don't think that matters. Likewise for pickguards and control plates. For those I always drill a pilot hole (usually smaller than the actual hole needed) and then when I move up to the actual size I set the drill to reverse (usually a handheld) so that it lightly sands a cone shape into the finish. This way the drill bit gets thru the top layer of the finish and doesn't forcefully grab the finish when cutting. With drilling them first you end up with thin finish near the hole as it tries to fill up the hole. And then you have to redrill thru that hardened finish anyway (ie. drill twice)...IMO I prefer to drilll after.

    I'm about to start finishing an ash tele myself in transparent purple (a gift for a very eccentric drummer) and its my first build solo (I did one other with a cabinet maker). This thread was pretty helpful in prepping me to start.

    Also I wanted to volunteer these links: I bought some foam backed sandpaper online and they're relatively cheap and helpful in the cutaway and heel area..

    http://store.mannyswoodworkersplace.com/bllifobasapa.html

    Also high grit sandpaper up to 12,000 that Ive used by hand and can attach to a sander. I accidently cut thru the clearcoat while making a template from a MIM body. I went sheet by sheet until 15000 and now you can't even tell there was something there.

    http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=11435&filter=20106&pn=20106
     

  13. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    unfortunately, this project has been on hold waiting on my neck money... $350 hurts on a tight newly wed budget!

    But as soon as I get that ordered I'll post more pics of the process...:lol:
     

  14. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    Wetsanding

    I'm doing my wetsanding. I've been at it an hour now so far, and there's still a good bit of shiny spots.

    I started with 600 but it was going to slow. Now I'm using 400, but its still going slow. Its starting to look alot better, but I have a ton of little shiny spots all over. Any advice? At this point I'm worried about getting sandthroughs trying to get these little spots out.

    Let me know any advice you guys have!
     

  15. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

    Jun 29, 2009
    USA
    As always, pictures would really be helpful.

    400 grit is aggressive for this stage. If it's not leveling the finish and your expectation is a mirror shine, you're probably not through with clear coats.

    Get it as level as you can and spray 3 to 5 more coats. It may seem like chasing your tail but every leveling step not only get you closer to a buffable surface, the following coats of clear should lie down even smoother.

    There are just too many variables in finishing to see where you may be off track. Spraying technique is a huge part of successful finishing. If you're truly close to sanding thru and you don't want to back up to more clear coats, maybe lower the expectation of a first attempt. Buff it out and be proud of a completed effort. The next one will be better...and so on.

    Peace,
    Mark
     

  16. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    I'll post some pics in just a moment. Its not huge dimples, but tiny little shiny spots all over. Would something like this show through even after the final buffing?
     

  17. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    As i said before the issues seem minor... but I've been level sanding w/ 400 for what seems like HOURS and these little spots are taking forever to get it out. I'd honestly prefer to not spray anymore clear, but I don't want to sand through my lacquer either.

    [​IMG]

    You can see it near the trem holes in the above pic...


    [​IMG]
     

  18. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    I've got it sanded to 1000(I started back at 400 easily to get the bigger scratches out), and its waiting for the 1200,1500, and 2000. I'm pretty sure after several hours of 400 sanding and no sandthroughs, I can't have any clear coat left right?

    I will probably continue on with the sanding and buffing/waxing at this point. I want to see how deep the finish looks and reevaluate. I got the majority of the big scuffs/scratches out when I went back through wetsanding, and most of the dimples/peel are gone.

    I'm not sure if spraying more clear at this point is really what I want to do. If I have a bad spray technique, I think I will just recreate the problem. Although, I think the source of my problem MOSTLY stems from bad spraying primer and not completely leveling it due to sandthroughs.

    I will have to sit on this one and see how it looks with no more clear added after polishing to decide where to go. I realize this has been a SUPER long thread, and I've lost most of the help I had. But any advice would be much appreciated!
     

  19. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

    Jun 29, 2009
    USA
    You're really down to 2 options...both of which you already mentioned. Polish it now or add more clear.


    From the remaining dimples and knowing the amount of sanding you've been doing, I'd say your top coats were pretty rough. For whatever reason, they didn't lay down nicely. My guess would be improper surface prep before clear and perhaps inexperienced spraying. Neither of which is a poke at you, just things we learn from as we go.

    If you buff it out at this stage, I don't think you're going to be happy with the results...either because of the dimples or because you will likely burn through.

    If it were me, I'd spray some more clear. Reason being that you took off a bunch during sanding and the risk of burn through during buffing is a very real possibilty. You now have probably the smoothest surface you've had so far. Spray 4 or 5 medium coats, wait 24 hours, wet sand with 800 or 1000 grit, spray 4 or 5 more coats and let it sit for a few weeks. Sand and polish.

    There's no mystery to getting a "dipped in glass" finish but it does take experience and patience. Knowing when to regroup is a big part of experience and a great test of patience.

    Peace,
    Mark
     

  20. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    I will probably go for the remaining dimples and other issues before I spray clear again. The scratches should cover with the clear as well right?

    I'm sure alot of it has been my spraying technique, but the biggest mistake I KNOW I've made was spraying the primer on a windy day and then not leveling the overspray and orange peel enough. That will be something I will not repeat! I honestly can't believe that I haven't sanded through. I guess that Acrylic Lacquer is pretty tough stuff.
     

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