Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Step by Step Walkthrough

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by westaman, Jun 15, 2010.

  1. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    I've actually just planned on hand buffing the finesse it/perfect it..
     

  2. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    Ok, I'm talked into getting a machine buffer for this. I sand it back flat tonight 400>600>1000... This is after I dropped it for the first time tonight. This left two dings inbetween pickups and some scuffs that came out. Crisis avoided...

    Then I was setting up to spray my 1 of 2 last clear coats, and I feel it slipping. In slow motion, I watched fall to the tile and bounce. It landed on the butt of the guitar right near the input jack slot. Its right on the edge of the guitar, so there's no way I can fix it. My heart just dropped after I saw that. I picked it up, put on a heavy coat of clear and shrugged it off. What could I do at this point right?
     

  3. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    I may try to fix this. I would tape of a rectangle around the spot and try to drop fill it with SS to get it back to level and carefully try to wetsand it back level. Does this sound like a process that would work?

    I DO NOT WANT TO GO BACK TO WOOD AND BUILD IT BACK UP!!!
     

  4. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

    Jun 29, 2009
    USA
    It's impossible to answer this type of question without seeing what you're up against. It's kind of like asking an opinion on a color but not showing us the color.

    Post some pics that show us what's happening and we may be able to offer advice on your plan or another approach.

    Peace,
    Mark
     

  5. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    Well, I will reinspect when I get home. I will see if I can get to show up in a pic, although I ahven't had much luck with this black body!

    My only thought about doing drop filling and going from there is that it created a crater with raised edges which will lose paint when I sand it flat. But I guess even that will work itself out. The other thing is that its on a stratocaster edge, which is pretty rounded off.

    I probably will try to use some 1" painters tape to protect the surrounding areas so I don't affect the surrounding area. But I just will try to use the can of SS to keep spot filling till its to a point to be sanded flat. I'm assuming wetsanding is the best to use when trying to be delicate.
     

  6. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    I got it pretty straightened out with SS, and its got 2 new coats of clear on it. Time for the closet!!!

    Can someone give me any tips on wet sanding and what I'm looking for. I kind of figured out that the idea is to use 400 to get it as flat as you possibly can, with out sanding through, right? Then just go from there. Is 400 the one that you spend the most time on, or should you spend equal amounts of time on all of the different grades?
     

  7. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

    Jun 29, 2009
    USA
    First, don't rush the drying time. You have alot of coats on there and they need time to dry. Even though it may be dry to the touch and sand easily, the finish needs time to fully dry. Buffing will generate heat and a soft finish won't do well during buffing.

    400 is too agressive for level sanding. Being that you're new to the process, I would start with 800 and do the most work with it. As you progress thru the grits, it takes less and less time. Once you've leveled at 800, the 1000 grit is only removing 800 grit scratches, the 1200 removes only 1000 grit scratches and so on...each grit takes less time.

    Use a small piece of stiff rubber as a backer for the sand paper...don't just use your hand. The tips of your fingers will cause problems. You need a flat surface.

    Use warm water with a drop of dish soap in it to keep the sand paper lubricated. Keep an eye on the slurry that comes off as you sand. As long as it's pasty white, you're doing okay. If you see any black, stop and check your work.

    Use small circular motions with light pressure...let the sand paper do the work.

    Keep a soft, clean cloth handy to wipe the area dry and work in a well lit area where you can tilt the body at an angle to a light source to check your work. You want the light to shine across the surface and to your eye.

    Stay off the edges...buffing will take care of them later. The edges don't hold as much finish as the flat surfaces and will be your first problem area for burn thru if you sand them and remove finish.

    Peace,
    Mark
     

  8. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    Yeah the majority of level sanding needs to take place on the front and back of the guitar. The sides are relatively smooth, and I don't plan to mess with the edges!

    I am going to honestly just let this thing sit for atleast a month. I need a break from the frustrations/disappointments that come with handling something nice and trying to keep it that way!

    I appreciate all the help. I have a bottle of Finesse It, is Perfect It necessary to go on afterwards or no? I'm probably going to borrow a 4" buffer from a guy I know to get that beautiful finish...
     

  9. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    Here's my fix job if you're interested. It looked alot better last night, but I guess the Lacquer sunk into the dent over night. Guess I can expect that to continue the huh?!

    Here is before:

    [​IMG]

    Here is after, not great but better for my first fix-it job:

    [​IMG]

    I'm assuming that will level down more once I wet sand. But it looks pretty good and its already in and inconspicuous spot, so I'm pretty happy with the results.

    On the other hand, the body was very difficult to get the Clear looking uniform as it dried. No matter how wet of passes or how well I sprayed it, one spot would be shiny and another matte. Not sure what the issue is here, but it seemed like it alternated. I'm assuming that this will buff out to be fine when I do my wet sanding. Atleast, I hope it will!!!

    Here it is waiting for the wet sand:

    [​IMG]

    Let me know what you guys think!
     

  10. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

    Jun 29, 2009
    USA
    Nice job on the repair. It looks like you're on your way to a pretty finish. The clear seems to have laid down nicely. Don't worry about the glossy vs dull areas, that will all be taken care of in the sanding/polishing steps.

    Nice job!

    Peace,
    Mark
     

  11. Colt W. Knight

    Colt W. Knight Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Jan 21, 2007
    Tucson, AZ
    It'll all buff out clear and shiny.
     

  12. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    Where can I get a 4" buffer to polish?
     

  13. Hollmanp90

    Hollmanp90 Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 10, 2009
    Hamilton County
    Wal-mart.......I think Coleman branded, its Orange and the cotton pads will be right there by it.

    You gonna be fine........start w/some 800grit when wet sanding.
    On up through 2000, some Scratch X and a good wax.I bet you will be pleased.

    I believe your going for a somewhat aged fiinsh, you may be surprised that its too shiney.

    Thats an easy fix.

    Keep on trucking.
     

  14. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    I'm actually going for that black mirror finish, and then I'll let it be my beater guitar... Probably my "go to" guitar honestly... Alot of love and time spent with this one already!

    So you think it will be shiney, eh?

    I may start with 600, but I think 400 may be necessary for some of the "dimpling" that occurred.

    Any idea roughly how much the 4" buffer costs?
     

  15. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    Still haven't been able to find a small buffer... Lowe's had a 6 inch, but I hate to pay $30 for it
     

  16. Guitarnut

    Guitarnut Friend of Leo's

    Jun 29, 2009
    USA
    Considering the Finesse foam pads from StewMac are $15, $30 for a buffer isn't so bad. Muscle power is free, I guess you could buff it by hand. :twisted:

    If you have a Harbor Freight nearby, take a look around there. I know they have foam pads but I'm not sure about the backer/mandrel for them. Might check any local auto body stores, too.

    Peace,
    Mark
     

  17. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    I would love to borrow one, to save the $30. But I guess once you've got one, it helps if you ever want to do it again?
     

  18. Hollmanp90

    Hollmanp90 Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 10, 2009
    Hamilton County
    Choose right or left....and grab a cotton T-shirt.
    And get busy.

    Like I said, Go to Wal-Mart, Orange Coleman brand 6" and some terry cloth pads. I do think it'll be under $30.

    Lets go back to day one.


    YOU WILL ABSOLUTELY NOT!!!!!!!!

    Save money by doing it yourself.
    I'll say it again. It gonna be really tough to build,paint and finsh a guitar under the $600 price point.

    We fool one another in thinking like this.......out of the gate, it ain't happening.

    Even building something compared to a $99 SX thats been setup and dialed in playable.........the whole package,from initial prep,to paint and wet sand and buff on into wiring and set up and nut work as you are doing.....Your got to be honest with yourself........Don't whine about $30......buff the thang out by hand and spend the $30 on some nut files. Or spend the $30 on your buffer and hope you can pruchase a pre-cut thats gonna slide right in your nut slot.Ain't gonna happen.....but again. I certainly hope you didn't build it to save money..........

    Even with your donk ups and mistakes, your learning form them.
    There is some value in that......Spend the $30 on the buffer or get busy hand buffing.......You will not be the first to hand buff one.

    Building and assembly ain't for whiners.......by any means necessary.
    Get it done and rockin' roll is straight from hell.

    And please......don't take me the wrong way......Your doing just fine. :cool:
     

  19. westaman

    westaman Tele-Meister

    345
    Feb 4, 2010
    GA
    No, I'm not worried about saving money... I calculated $1,100 for this, and expect it to be more like $1,300. I just hate to spend $30 on the buffer when I want to order that awesome MK neck!

    I guess there's no hurrying this process.. IT'S EXPENSIVE!!!!!
     

  20. Hollmanp90

    Hollmanp90 Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 10, 2009
    Hamilton County
    Sounds like you got a plan.
    Just trying to help.
     

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