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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Starting my first tele build...looking for advice

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by newuser1, Mar 1, 2017.

  1. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County

  2. dsutton24

    dsutton24 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Dec 29, 2010
    Illinois
    I did buy a plunge router the first time out. I haven't used it in years. The problem is that many of them don't have depth stops that positively lock. You're plunging and routing away, and before you know it you've plunge right through the front of your work. I've got a couple of Porter Cable 690LR routers, and another that's an older version (I don't remember its name). They're all I use these days.
     

  3. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Meister

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    Mar 1, 2017
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  4. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    newuser1 likes this.

  5. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Meister

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    Mar 1, 2017
    Toronto
    Thanks Marty,

    I'll read the linked thread carefully and will post follow up questions if I have any.

    I tried sanding the guitar body outline with this drum sanding kit and my hand drill and I wasn't impressed with the speed and the final result:

    https://www.amazon.ca/Woodstock-D3292-Drum-Sanding-16-Piece/dp/B001XQMRH4

    It looks like using this kit will be a real pain on the longer curves as metioned earlier in this thread.
    I'm considering buying a belt sander or the ROSS, but I'm not sure which is better for guitar building - a belt sander or a spindle sander. Which one would be more versitile and easier to work with?
     

  6. OtherJMac

    OtherJMac Tele-Meister Ad Free Member

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    Sep 5, 2016
    Atlanta
    Spindle. A belt sander is great for flat surfaces, and general woodworking, but it can't do the tight curves on a guitar very well.
     
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  7. RogerC

    RogerC Poster Extraordinaire Vendor Member

    Mar 30, 2011
    Oklamerica
    I didn't see anyone else address this, but it needs to be said...

    If your blank is warped, planing it will NOT get rid of the warp. It will only make it thinner. When a piece of wood goes through a planer, pressure rollers press it onto the table, which will flatten out any twists or warps as the cutter head shaves off the wood. As it exits the planer, though, the twists spring back

    To get rid of the warping/twisting, you need to run it through a sander or get a good plane and learn how to do it manually.
     
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  8. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Meister

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    Mar 1, 2017
    Toronto
    Thanks!

    The cheapest I can find ist this one, and it has good reviews:

    https://www.amazon.ca/Rockwell-RK90...qid=1488833295&sr=8-1&keywords=spindle+sander

    Would it do the job, or do I get the ROSS for $40 more?

    https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p....nk|affiliate|comm-junction||EN||||||10678183|

    Thanks for pointing this out. I'm not going to use my first experimental body - I'm just practicing my cutting, sanding, and routing on it.
     

  9. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Spend the 40 and get the ross. Then you have two sanders. The belt sander portion is useful for getting small parts flat, like bone nuts you make yourself.
     
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  10. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Meister

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    I read the thread you suggested and I have a few questions regarding your post. I'm leaning towards using 1/4" plywood for my templates, and was wondering what bits do you use (brands and models) with your 1/4" plywood templates for the body cavities and for shaping the body?

    I'll get the ROSS then...thanks
     

  11. RogerC

    RogerC Poster Extraordinaire Vendor Member

    Mar 30, 2011
    Oklamerica
    1/4" is too thin. You'd have to take too big a bite with the router bit, and you don't have much material for the bearing to ride on. Use 3/4" material for the template.

    Also, plywood doesn't make very good template material. Many times there are voids, and they can wreak havoc if your bearing falls into one.
     

  12. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Meister

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    What material do you use for templates?
     

  13. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

    Mar 27, 2012
    Calgary, Alberta
    Go back to post #14. I mentioned it there.
     
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  14. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    1/4" is not too thin if you use a short bit like the stewmac or toolstoday variety. Stew mac templates are even thinner than 1/4. Good quality Baltic birch interior plywood doesn't have the same kind of voids like exterior plywood does. My templates are original poplar plywood 1/4" thick from the early 1980's. Yep they have some epoxy and sawdust or plastic wood here and there to repair them... I'd never use MDF unless there was nothing else. Template material can be any rigid sheet goods you want to make them out of. As always, YMMV. :)

    http://www.stewmac.com/Luthier_Tool...n=2017-03-gp&gclid=CKnUh5CYxNICFYiKswodXDIAog


    https://www.toolstoday.com/p-5046-flush-trim-plunge-template-router-bits-w-upper-ball-bearing.aspx
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2017
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  15. RogerC

    RogerC Poster Extraordinaire Vendor Member

    Mar 30, 2011
    Oklamerica
    And those are some very key details to know. Unfortunately I think most people see "plywood" and immediately run to the nearest big box store and get what's available, which is no good.

    Without having the details you just mentioned (appropriately sized bit, good quality plywood), I think a new builder would be getting set up for failure.
     
    newuser1 likes this.

  16. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    Only if they go cheap. Actually the small handy panels at Lowes are luan, birch, poplar and the bottom of the barrel spf which is more potato chip like with observable patches. I have a thinline template made out of pine 1 x 12 for all the routs... it works fine. One has to consider all the alternatives, not just one. ;-)

    https://www.lowes.com/pd/1-4-in-Birch-Plywood-Application-as-2-x-4/1000066175
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2017
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  17. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Meister

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    Toronto
    Ok here is my understanding of template/router bits setups:

    If I go with 1/4" template I have to use a shorter bit like those:

    http://www.stewmac.com/Luthier_Tool...n=2017-03-gp&gclid=CKnUh5CYxNICFYiKswodXDIAog

    If I go with 3/4" template I have the option to use longer bits, so I can complete the body outline with less passes. My understanding is that the bits that fit in 1/2" collet size are better over 1/4" ones, however my router accepts 1/4" only, so I don't have a choice here.

    Please let me know if I got all above right?

    I also read a few articles about the dangers of inhaling MDF dust, and I don't like the idea of using it for my templates anymore. Do I have any other options apart from quality 1/4" plywood and plexiglas? Is the plexiglas dust also dangerous to inhale (I imagine it is) and is it much harder to work with plexiglas compared to MDF?
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2017

  18. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Meister

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    Mar 1, 2017
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  19. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    The plywood will be fine. I'm not sure how the Ross is too big but the other sander will work too. I suspect they are about the same size. In a nutshell, the first template bits to become available for DIY guitar work were the stewmac 1/2 x 1/2 bit they still carry. Their templates are 3/16 plexi. They work fine. As time passed, router bit companies started to produce a 1/2x 1" long template bit. For some unknown reason...probably price...this caught on and now it seems like most opt for that bit. In reality they'll both work but your initial pass with a 1" long bit requires a thicker template. So.... to conclude you have to decide which bit you are going to buy and then go from there. Also useful is to remove the bulk of the rout before routing. This keeps the bit sharper longer and makes for a safer first pass since you have a hole for the bit to start in. I don't recommend pattern routing a perimeter because more often than not, tear out happens. I opt for cutting and sanding to the line. A Ross can to that pretty well.

    I like the stewmac bit because I've used them for 30 years and they are sharp. You may want a roundover bit for the rounded edges and a flush trim bit with the bearing at the other end just because they are useful to have. If you are making a truss rod slot in a neck, a 3/16" to 1/4 slot is required depending on which rod you make or use. Read the challenge build threads in the sticky on the main Home Depot page.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2017

  20. newuser1

    newuser1 Tele-Meister

    Age:
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    Mar 1, 2017
    Toronto
    Thanks Marty,

    The ROSS is much bigger than the Rockwell - I've seen them both, and one of them is in my basement now :).

    in the 1/2 x 1/2 the first 1/2 refers to the shank, and the second 1/2 refers to the length of the cutting part, right?
    Do they make 1/4 shank bits?

    I assume you are talking about the body cavities? How do I remove the bulk of the wood before routing, by just hand-drilling with regular bit? If that's the case how do I make sure I don't go too deep with the hand drill for example?

    So you just cut the body outline as close as possible and then sand with the spindle sander down the line?

    Can I get a way with buying a single routing bit in the beginning, and if yes which one would you recommend, assuming 1/4 plywood templates?
     

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