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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com Reilander Pickups
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com Reilander Pickups
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Starting a 5F11 Vibrolux build - bias question

Discussion in 'Shock Brother's DIY Amps' started by jsnwhite619, Dec 12, 2016.

  1. jsnwhite619

    jsnwhite619 Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    836
    Sep 10, 2013
    Georgia
    Well, you know how tdpri junkies are once we get the itch. So, I looked at my scrap wood pile of end cuts, and random sized pieces of birch plywood, and scrap pile of Tweed end cuts, and I decided to build a Champ cab too. 1492748323020.jpg
     
    robrob and tubeswell like this.
  2. King Fan

    King Fan Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

    Jan 1, 2013
    Salt Lake City
    Nice. You make it sound so easy -- and instantaneous.
     
  3. jsnwhite619

    jsnwhite619 Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    836
    Sep 10, 2013
    Georgia
    I think I'm a minority around here. The woodworking is what I grew up around and is the easier part of it for me, I started out as an absolute rookie on the electrical part. You guys leave me scratching my head and running to Google a couple times a week.
    I've learned a LOT about the wiring and electrical stuff in the past couple years, but so far, I've never felt 120 volts through a piece of pine!
     
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  5. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Tele-Afflicted

    Jan 7, 2011
    Washington, USA
    I'm with you. I've always been amazed when the amp gurus get stumped by a little wood work, because they're so knowledgeable about something that is soooooo much more difficult, at least to me.

    The cabs are looking great by the way. What kind of baffle are you going to use? I replaced the thin baffle in my 5e3 with a 3/4" ply baffle and found it improved the amp noticeably, at least to my ear. It got rid of some the "looseness" that is the 5e3. Anyway, just curious.
     
  6. jsnwhite619

    jsnwhite619 Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    836
    Sep 10, 2013
    Georgia
    Thanks. I use 3/8" Baltic birch for the baffle. I have to order it online because nobody local carries anything like it quality-wise, I think it is 7-ply void free. https://www.woodcraft.com/products/baltic-birch-plywood-9mm-3-8-x-24-x-30
    I've never used the 1/4", it just feels too flimsy to me. I can flex the 1/4" with my hands, the 3/8" feels like a piece of plate steel. On the cabs I finished with the oiled wood, I used the 3/8" for the back panel. The ones I covered in tweed had 1/4" panels, but after the tweed wraps around it's close to 3/8" finished. Lowes has 1/4" thick pieces of poplar that are maybe 6" wide x 2ft long that I rip strips from and glue on around the edges for the grill offset.

    How would you describe the 3/4" sound? Do you think it boosted/cut the bass or treble any?

    As far as the woodworking, I love it, but now that I think about it, I can see it being harder to do just because of the investment cost if you didn't have any tools already, and you have to have a space where you can operate. A $40 soldering iron & an open window can get the job done without noise or dust in any apartment or neighborhood. A few hundred $$$ for a table saw & router wouldn't be worth buying and learning how to use for one or two builds.
     
  7. CapnCrunch

    CapnCrunch Tele-Afflicted

    Jan 7, 2011
    Washington, USA
    You're right on the money with the observation about tooling cost for those who just want to build a single cab.

    Regarding the difference between 3/4" vs thinner baffles, I would describe the difference as the thicker baffle causing the amp to sound more focused. It would be interesting to analyze the frequency response difference between the two, but I don't have that ability. My ears tell me that a thicker baffle causes the amp to sound less "loose". The most noticeable difference to my ear is that the low end sounds tighter. I'm sure there is some comb filtering going on with any baffle, regardless of size. The thicker baffle yields a different resonant frequency and probably damps different frequencies than the thinner baffle does. It's worth experimenting with different thicknesses because it is a pretty cheap and easy thing to build. It may be a way to kind of fine tune the sound of certain amps when you want to accentuate one quality or the other i.e. more focused vs. a little looser.

    The thicker baffle also helps in decoupling the sound waves produced by the cone of the speaker from the waves produced by the baffle. I'm not a sound engineer, and I don't pretend to completely understand this, but decoupling was one of the goals of the old Fender tone rings, and also one the reasons why surface mounted speakers sound different than rear mounted speakers. The thicker baffle is much more effective at decoupling than thin baffles are.
     
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