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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Squier: Standard tele versus Classic Vibe

Discussion in 'Squier Tele Forum' started by FatRosie, Oct 26, 2013.

  1. FatRosie

    FatRosie Tele-Meister

    323
    Nov 1, 2009
    Massachusetts
    Okay. Went to a Guitar Center. Tried 'em. Decided on the Squier Classic Vibe Telecaster, with rosewood neck (therefore, brown sunburst/tobacco burst body). Ordered one used from GC for $249. Good deal, though tax and shipping added some (like $38, actually). Still, for a used one in perfect condition, a pretty good deal. I'll do a NGD post when it arrives!
     
    Fender Bob likes this.

  2. moonman2

    moonman2 Tele-Meister

    263
    Apr 2, 2012
    England
    You are correct; the CVC is thinner than any Tele neck I've ever encountered.
     

  3. FatRosie

    FatRosie Tele-Meister

    323
    Nov 1, 2009
    Massachusetts
    That's what I found when I tried them out today. For my hands, that makes CVC the best neck.
     

  4. BigDaddyLH

    BigDaddyLH Telefied Ad Free Member

    Congrats! I prefer rosewood fretboards, too. The CVC looks like it should cost a lot more than it does.
     

  5. Reeek

    Reeek Tele-Holic

    Well done ;)

     

  6. tce63

    tce63 Tele-Holic

    583
    Jan 18, 2013
    Sweden
    Nice :)
     

  7. FatRosie

    FatRosie Tele-Meister

    323
    Nov 1, 2009
    Massachusetts

  8. user34603

    user34603 TDPRI Member

    Age:
    67
    85
    Dec 5, 2016
    Richmond VA
    My view in having owned both is that the Squier Standard is 'good enough' if you can play. It's a good bit less money and the pickup tone and neck feel are more to my liking. A guy who cannot really play most any pop or country song is not much of a guitarist and a 'better' guitar appeals to him. But the more full neck and pickup tone of the Standard is more to my taste as a guitar player. The Standard can always be sold easily if you run across a used CV very cheap and in good shape (sometimes with upgraded pickups). A CV will be harder to get your money out of. Look at the custom pine Tele with very birdseye neck and Fralin Big Singles on my profile photo. I have good guitars and can play and write and sing as well as do all my own mods and setup tweaks (HB polepiece adjustment, 4-way Tele switch, and so on). I am convinced the Squier Standard is the better choice for $$, feel, tone, resale and plain old value as a Tele.
     

  9. user34603

    user34603 TDPRI Member

    Age:
    67
    85
    Dec 5, 2016
    Richmond VA
     

  10. user34603

    user34603 TDPRI Member

    Age:
    67
    85
    Dec 5, 2016
    Richmond VA
    excellent points... you left out the single best and easy mod... a 4-way switch (position 4 is both pups on in series.... like position 2...(parallel pups) on steroids).
     

  11. Rod Parsons

    Rod Parsons Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    70
    Sep 26, 2009
    Winchester, Va.
    My 2010 vintage white CV-50 is far better than any Fender I have ever played, including originals from the 60's. Best sounding Tele I have ever owned. I paid $320.00 new at a shop...., Second hand, I probably could have gotten one near mint, for $150.00. Don't let the FENDER headstock logo fool you. The CVs are better than most Fenders, imo. By the way. I have not altered my CV in any way since I got it 6 years ago. It stays in tune a 100 times better than my American Standard from 1991, and it plays 10 times better to boot..
     
    Grandy likes this.

  12. twangabee

    twangabee TDPRI Member

    10
    Jan 30, 2016
    Ontario
    I'd also like to ask a few questions about the Squire teles... I'm new to the Tele entirely. I was looking for something to get comfortable on, something not so expensive. I played a Squier Affinity Series Telecaster in Lake Placid Blue today (about $269 CDN) and another Squier for about 310.00 bucks - I think it was a Squire Standard, paisley pickguard, ash body, with a semi transparent red-ish burst.

    Both of them had this density and focus to them that just blew my mind. The necks on both were unfinished on the back, and both had rosewood fretboards. I played both of them un-plugged

    Although both seemed to have very hard, dense necks, for some reason, the Affinity had this incredibly bright SNAP, seemed very dense, and heavier, and it had this accentuated string attack/focus, (if you pick close to the bridge saddles, that TEEOWWNG sound) and the incredible sustain, the body resonated — instantly, as if no energy was absorbed into the neck, or lost anywhere. What a cool experience.

    I'm coming from owning an SG standard which is heavy for an SG, plays great, but has a bassier response. It has a kind of snap too, but not nearly as responsive as these squires.

    Questions Please, if you can:

    1) If I was inclined to have the neck treated in some way, not with a lacquer, but some kind of oil that could maintain the smooth feel of an unfinished neck, what could I use?

    2) If I wanted to strip the poly finish on the body, remove the blue paint, what might the grade of wood look like underneath?

    3) If I wanted to upgrade the bridge, bridge pickup etc, are there good choices to put other hardware on?

    I'm just astounded at the responsiveness of these guitars. I had tried a few USA Tele's in the past that didn't have anything close to this kind of snap or sustain.

    I keep thinking, where's the catch?

    Do these Squiers stay in tune as well as "USA" Tele's?

    Thank you.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2016

  13. Zaneprice

    Zaneprice TDPRI Member

    Age:
    24
    14
    Oct 30, 2016
    Seven Hills, OH United States
    I would definitely go for the classic vibe you get a lot more for the money. Just feels so much better then a standard squire.
     

  14. jvin248

    jvin248 Friend of Leo's

    Apr 18, 2014
    Near Detroit, MI
    This is a stripped Affinity body. The back side shown is the under-paint veneer, the front side shown (except for the maple and walnut strips inlaid to patch a bad pickup route hack by a previous owner) is sanded through the veneer to the body wood. There is grain there to show. Do know the poly finish is thick and will take a lot of sanding and make a big mess.

    This guitar has Fender MIM pickups in it and Affinity bridge/etc hardware. Really, the only upgrades that are valuable (in other words the Affinity base parts are ok) are the pickups and the pots, caps, switch, output jack, and fret level.

    Buy one and get a fret level done on it, replace the volume pot with a bourns, switchcraft output jack, oak-grigsby 4-way switch, Curt Mangan strings, leave the rest as stock (unless you want the color different), and play it like crazy. Oh, make sure you flip the control plate when you do the other mods.


    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     

  15. twangabee

    twangabee TDPRI Member

    10
    Jan 30, 2016
    Ontario
    Thanks guys. Well, I tried the classic vibe, I didn't like that sticky neck poly finish. There was something really slinky and fast about the Squire's unfinished neck.

    I tried a few classic vibes. For me, the thing that's most important, is that dense feeling, less "woody" and more snap and sustain in the strings - you know that elliptical effect when strings just ring forever? Both the squires I tried played like that. I REALLY liked the red transparent finish Squire, with the rosewood neck. I'm almost certain it was this one: http://intl.fender.com/en-CA/squier...elecaster-rosewood-fingerboard-antique-burst/

    That standard squire, actually played the best. The blue Squire Affinity was almost too bright, "BLINGY" sounding. But the standard had that same hard edged attack in the strings, and a TON of sustain. And I loved the fretboard, weight, etc. I just learned that this Tele Squire Standard model: 0321200537 is made of Agathis wood, a "cheaper" wood, in greater supply than mahogany.

    Either way, I'm not convinced that expensive U.S. Tele's or strats are always "better". I've tried more than a few Ash and Alder U.S Tele Deluxe models that didn't have that classic SNAP! So, everything is telling me to buy it.

    Nice axe jvin248, I'd probably strip that red burst finish on the standard though, I like the ones that look like Jeff Beck's Tele Gib: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/41/02/0d/41020d8ce77ca9bd8ef1566bb4efd9c9.jpg

    Another question please...
    Why do Tele's and strats with 9 guage strings feel slinkier, easier to bend, with a 25.5 scale length?
    Where as Gibson with a 24.75 scale feels stiffer with 9's?

    I don't sit in the Gibson camp, or one guitar company over another. But part of me wishes Gibson could somehow make their SG's, LP's, snap the same way that Tele's and strats do. I know they're completely different animals, but when I look at the hard-tail tele and strat bridges, you have a very short string length coming out of the bridge, or out of the body, and it immediately goes over a very small contact point on the saddle, or brass barrel. There's no dual contact points like on a stop tail and Tune-omatic, or ABR bridge.

    I think maybe that has something to do with the feel? They SNAP, CRACKLE & POP, lots of definition, that KERRANG. I'm going to buy this guitar, and mod the **** out of it!
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2016

  16. T Prior

    T Prior Poster Extraordinaire

    Mar 17, 2003
    Charlotte NC
    pretty interesting review !

    Easily challenged though. ( In Fun )

    Uhmmm...
    better than most Fenders
    stays in tune 100 times better
    plays 10 times better
    best sounding
    Fender Head stock Logo fools us
    plays better than any other Telecasters


    I too had a CV for a short period, Paid $279 , was it nice ? Sure , it was easily worth the $279. Probably the best under $300 Telecaster on the market.

    But it wasn't any of that stuff mentioned above ! I don't own it anymore, I gave it to my friend.

    Evidently I'm one of those who got fooled by the Fender logo and higher prices ! :)
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2016

  17. T Prior

    T Prior Poster Extraordinaire

    Mar 17, 2003
    Charlotte NC
    Well they are slinkier predominantly due to the gauge, but you already knew that. The longer scale allows the "physics" of it to come into play. 9's on a shorter scale will indeed be tad stiffer. Almost an inch matters in the equation of physics.

    I use 9's on all electrics now ( 4-tele's and 1- strat) mostly because of a left arm nerve issue I had several years back. True , they bend a tad easier and play a bit easier than 10's, but on the other side of the coin is they put out a tad less signal than 10's, yes noticeable.

    Personally I think 10's are the ideal strings for Tele's but we use what we use.

    I too would have liked the SG to be a bit more "TELE" edged rather than "Les Paul" edged, but they are totally different guitars. I never found my way on the SG's , even the LP's and 335's to me now feel awkward after being a "Tele Camper" for just shy of 40 years. And that middle PUP on those Strats, they are just dang in the way of my right hand ! :eek:
     

  18. Grandy

    Grandy Tele-Meister

    156
    Sep 18, 2010
    Finland
    I know exactly what you mean. I went into a guitar shop a little while ago to test a pedal I was interested in. Took a Squier CV 50s tele to do it with and ever since I've been thinking about selling my 2004 American Series Tele to buy one. It's going to need a fret job pretty soon anyway.
     

  19. Chicago Matt

    Chicago Matt Tele-Afflicted

    Aug 23, 2014
    Woodstock
    9's feel "stiffer" on a shorter scale neck? Never experienced that one, in fact it has always been the opposite for me.

    I like my CV 50's VB Tele more than the American Special I bought first. I returned that American Special. I had budgeted $1,000 but honestly feel the CV 50 was just a better guitar. I gig with it regularly too.
     

  20. twangabee

    twangabee TDPRI Member

    10
    Jan 30, 2016
    Ontario
    Wow, lots of comments. I really don't have enough experience with Tele's in general - I'm a crappy guitar player to begin with, I usually try and noodle, play chords, mostly rhythm. Sometimes I've played expensive Teles, that don't have that SNAP, or enough of the TEEOWWNG tone in the strings, or lack focus. Both of these Squires had that in spades.

    My Gibson SG standard has a lot of "give" in the strings, but usually it's like walking a tightrope of, neck relief, bridge height, and raising or lowering the tailpiece, and top wrapping. They're just bassier in general, or at least mine is "meaty", but I can get it to crackle with new strings, and making the above adjustments "just right" for me.

    What I mean by slinkier on the Tele compared to the Gibson, is that maybe, the nut width at the headstock fools me. For some reason, a 1 5/8 nut width feels absolutely perfect. Gibson necks typically are wider, C shape, or a bit wider still, flatter etc.

    A friend of mine has a USA Dean Z Time Capsule - a MONSTER of an axe. It weighs 9.6 pounds exactly. It resonates very quickly, explosive, but it's warmer than a Tele, and yet, it has a very narrow nut width, and a hard V neck profile. — It's almost like the bastard son of a Gibson LP Traditional, that had a one night stand with a Tele!

    I've realized (because I have smaller hands) that the Tele 1 5/8ths nut width, with a hair more shoulder feels so damn good to hold. It's easier for me to move my hand around. And I think that 9.5 radius feels better than a 12" radius, — less flat, more "dig in"ability on the fretboard.

    I found that bending, or just simple pull offs were much easier on the Tele than on my SG, and WAY more definition, attack, nothing "rounded" sounding. The SG, just doesn't have the same kind of articulation. It's as if the Squire's strings, actually give back MORE energy than you put into them, I feel like I don't have to hit them as hard as on my SG, and they seem to have a wider "sweet spot" where I like to pick, over the bridge pickup itself. But WHERE and HOW you pick on the strings has a lot more expression in the tone, than compared to my SG. That's what I've found anyway.

    I'll look at a few more CV's, but I really dug that unfinished neck on the Squire standard, it was so smooth, slinky, and it just spanked for days.

    Sorry - edit made. I had to add this. As you all probably know, Jimmy Page recorded both Zepplin 1 & 2 with a Tele. I think that's the best way to describe that TEEOWWNG kind of tone, string expression. The intro to heartbreaker. There's some meat to it, but it's very detailed, "EEEOWWW", vowel like. I love that!
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2016

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