Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Squier Standard Tele - Bridge replacement

Discussion in 'Squier Tele Forum' started by Nope, Oct 6, 2016.

  1. Nope

    Nope TDPRI Member

    28
    May 9, 2011
    Toronto
    Been pondering mods to my 2015 Squier Standard Tele.

    Seems like the obvious choices are:

    - New tuners
    - Replace the plastic nut
    - Replace the pickups
    - Replace the bridge
    - Replace the jack & wiring harness

    I thought, as a starting point, I'd try replacing the bridge, but I can't find a bridge that has the same through-hole / screw pattern that's a direct swap, without re-drilling the body of the Tele.

    Once I've done the bridge, I think the nut would be next, then the pickups and harness.

    Can anyone point me towards a decent bridge replacement?

    Cheers.
     

  2. el cheapo

    el cheapo Tele-Afflicted

    Jan 13, 2011
    Southcentral Pa
    You don't list any reasons why you want to mod your guitar. Are the tuners, nut, pickups, bridge, jack and wiring harness all defective?
     

  3. Nope

    Nope TDPRI Member

    28
    May 9, 2011
    Toronto
    You're right. I didn't list any reasons. Let me clarify.

    It's been my experience that rigid things resonate better that less rigid things. Physics, therefore, strongly suggests that a better nut, made of either bone or synthetics, more rigid than simple plastic, might provide a more pleasing tone. I was very happy after replacing the plastic nut on my Epiphone ES-335 with bone, and would expect a similar improvement in sound on the Squier.

    Similarly, a more rigid and resonant bridge (and possibly saddles) may yield similar results, again, improving the tone of the guitar.

    The jack is defective, loose, freely spinning. All Squier jacks seem to be defective. I won't waste time having a warranty repair to replace it with a similarly cheap and unreliable jack that will need replacement in a year. I'll simply replace it with a reliable Switchcraft jack once and be done with it.

    I'm curious about what pickups may sound better than the factory ones. Open to suggestions on pickups that seem to work well with this model of Tele.

    As to the matter of tuners, I recently replaced the stock tuners on my Epi with lovely Klusons. The guitar now stays in tune for days in the stand, a very positive outcome.

    But since the nut, pickups, tuners and jack have few, if any, physical constraints, I posed my first question about the bridge, which appears to have many constraints, not the least of which is that apparently, no one makes a drop-in replacement for it.

    Which brings me, full circle, back to my original question:

    "Can anyone point me towards a decent bridge replacement?"
     

  4. nicod98

    nicod98 Tele-Holic

    540
    Jul 7, 2014
    Belgium
    For "standardized" MIM or MIA a lot of replacements are available. Perhaps it is a good thing that this is not the case for the "cheaper" Squier models.
    I am a Squier fan myself, and I can understand your quest for a perfect - but low cost - sound, but if high quality drop in replacements would be available for Bullet, Affinity or Standard telecasters, what would be the difference between a lower end Squier and a higher end Fender: a 5 piece body vs a 2 or 3 piece? If painted in a solid color, you wouldn't even know. You also might spend more money on upgrades, without augmenting the value of your guitar. It might even be cheaper to get a higher end guitar and change fewer things to your liking.

    My idea is to keep guitars as stock as possible, aka replacing only the parts that need replacing. I can understand the nut, and a broken jack, potentiometer or switch.
    If I wanted a high end guitar with high end parts, I'd buy a high end guitar. But since my playing is not of that level that I can outplay my Squier guitars, I don't.

    My experience with the Squier Standard bridge is that it is a solid bridge. I'd try replacing the other parts first: nut, electrics, jack. Check the frets and give the guitar a nice setup. If you don't have the sound you search, change the pickup heights, and if you cannot find the right sound, go for new pickups. You might not want to search for another bridge after that. Since there are no real drop in replacements, it might be the best solution.

    So instead of looking for a perfect bridge, it might be easier to check if you really need one to get the sound you want.
     

  5. Nope

    Nope TDPRI Member

    28
    May 9, 2011
    Toronto
    @nicod98 Damn. Hadn't considered pickup height, but you're right, it's probably worth mucking about with it.

    For the most part, I agree with you. For me, the "value" of the guitar is moot. It's insanely cheap. Why not experiment?

    I'll do the nut and the hideous jack, and then call it good.
     

  6. nicod98

    nicod98 Tele-Holic

    540
    Jul 7, 2014
    Belgium
    Hey that was quick... you were waiting for me to post this... :)

    It's just something I learned the hard way... Don't let every guitar sound the same, buy more and let guitars be original and therefore also let them be different. I have a nice collection and they all have their own identity. Some are better suited for one type of song, others for another type.

    Even with pickups I never thought I'd like, just changing the height made a world of difference.
     

  7. el cheapo

    el cheapo Tele-Afflicted

    Jan 13, 2011
    Southcentral Pa
    Squier Standards are generally solid guitars. Yours is the first one I've heard of with jack issues. An Electrosocket will sort that out and you'll never have trouble again. Stock tuners are solid and replacing them is unnecessary. Holding tune is more an issue with the nut than anything else. I cut a bone nut for mine just so I could widen out the string spacing a bit and give my chubby fingers more room. Most people who think a new nut alters the sound are actually hearing the difference made when the strings are changed out. Pots, wiring and switch are good too. I'd wait until you have issues before futzing with anything here, and you may never need to. Bridge may not be pretty if you like old school three barrel bridges, but the six saddles intonate perfectly well. The pickups are overwound and can be a bit muddy, especially the neck. This is the only weakness of the instrument IMHO. I changed mine out for more of a vintage voiced set. Folks who keep the stock pups generally like the way they sound with the Fezz Parka mod. Easy to do and really wakes up the neck pup. Good luck and enjoy your Squier Standard! They can be great players. A good setup is the key!
     
    Ricky D. likes this.

  8. kmaster

    kmaster Tele-Meister

    Age:
    27
    132
    May 25, 2008
    New York, New York
    My first electric guitar was a Squier Affinity Strat. Only aftermarket thing that fit (that I tried) was the pick guard...mostly. The dimensions were *just* off everything else that nothing else really fit. I had such a hard time with that guitar (intonation, keeping it in tune, etc.) once I realized what I should be wanting out of a guitar that I admit I was probably turned off Strats to this day. I wanted a Tele anyways (perhaps it was a good thing that my first electric experience wasn't a terrible Tele one!)! But YMMV.
     

  9. vintage clubber

    vintage clubber Friend of Leo's

    Apr 12, 2012
    Mechanicsville, VA

  10. Ricky D.

    Ricky D. Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    66
    Oct 22, 2006
    Garner, North Carolina

    I got a new 2007 Squier Std. Tele in 2007. There were a few mods that just screamed out to me:

    *OEM pickups were overwound and muddy sounding. Atrocious. Replaced with a used set of Fender OVs, $50 off ebay.

    *Replaced selector switch with a 4-way to add the B+N series sound.

    *Replaced jack cup and socket with Electrosocket cup and Switchcraft socket.

    *Replaced the OEM bridge and saddles with a Callaham American Std. plate and brass enhanced vintage saddles. This plate was the right size (longer than the traditional ash tray) and the string-through holes lined up. New mounting holes were needed, no big deal as the plate hid the old holes. Major change in tone with the Callaham plate, and very unsatisfactory. I reinstalled the OEM plate and saddles and have been very happy with the guitar ever since.

    The OEM tuners in mine have been just fine the last ten years, going strong.

    The OEM nut needed to have the slots tweaked a little, but that's a one-time set up issue. I do very little with open strings, so there's no tone issues with the nut for me ever.
     

  11. Nope

    Nope TDPRI Member

    28
    May 9, 2011
    Toronto
    Cool. Thanks for the input!
     
    Ricky D. likes this.

  12. archetype

    archetype More tone than talent Ad Free + Supporter

    737
    Jun 4, 2005
    Williamsville NY
    Uh... I'm not convinced. What doesn't it do, that you want it to do, that needs to be done with physical changes?
     

  13. Ira7

    Ira7 Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    61
    Jan 8, 2008
    Coral Springs, FL
    Nope posted this a year ago. So nope:

    Don't expect a reply from him here.
     

  14. Nope

    Nope TDPRI Member

    28
    May 9, 2011
    Toronto
    What I want it to do: have better string spacing, better tone (nut, pickups, bridge), and stay in tune.

    After reading the responses above, I decided that if I choose to upgrade the guitar, it'd be with better pickups, and little else.
     

  15. Nope

    Nope TDPRI Member

    28
    May 9, 2011
    Toronto
    Oh, golly, have a little faith, mate. Here I am, a year later, replying. ;-)
     
    LutherBurger likes this.

  16. MonkeyJefferson

    MonkeyJefferson Tele-Meister

    388
    Oct 26, 2010
    Nonurbana
    It stands to reason someone will eventually make a Squier Ashstray drop in. Fingers crossed here....
     

  17. Ira7

    Ira7 Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    61
    Jan 8, 2008
    Coral Springs, FL
    Wow!
     

  18. LutherBurger

    LutherBurger Friend of Leo's

    Oct 29, 2013
    NYC
    I widened the string spacing at the nut on my 2004 with an off-the-shelf TUSQ replacement. It plays much easier "down there" now.
     

  19. Nope

    Nope TDPRI Member

    28
    May 9, 2011
    Toronto
    I'm curious about how you did that. The E strings already slide off the fretboard for me, so spacing out the strings seems like it should be impossible.
     

  20. LutherBurger

    LutherBurger Friend of Leo's

    Oct 29, 2013
    NYC
    Ah... in that case, it may not be a good solution for you. Mine had plenty of space between the strings and fretboard edges at the nut, but not enough between the strings for my fingertips.
     

IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.