Something has me curious. (Guitar theory)

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by WetBandit, Feb 18, 2019.

  1. SixStringSlinger

    SixStringSlinger Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    If you harmonize a given scale, and visualize the chords all the way up the neck, you'll see scale patterns pop out from that. And vice versa, if you think of scale patterns (or really, just whatever "box" is made from the notes you would use in a lead part), you'll start noticing chord shapes in there.
     
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  2. The Angle

    The Angle Tele-Meister

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    Wait until someone says "song XXX, in one sharp." You'll really be lost.
     
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  3. mrmousey

    mrmousey Tele-Meister

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    To me that brings up a very mysterious subject, the whole right brain/left brain thing.
    According to research, the right half of the brain(which controls the left side of the body) is the intuitive/artistic side and the left half is the logical/intellectual side.
    You seemingly have bypassed the intellectual side of musical learning which a lot of people get hung up on and gone directly to the good part.
    Good for you man !
     
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  4. Beachbum

    Beachbum Friend of Leo's

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    There is nothing written anywhere that I know of that says you have to be able to explain the theory of how to do something in order to be able to do it. For example I'm a sailor. When I first began at the age of 14 I just jumped onto a small abandoned sail boat, raised the sails, pushed off from the dock, caught a wind and almost immediately capsized. I kept doing that until a year or so later I could sail in any direction and go anywhere I wanted to go. I didn't know a jib from a mainsail, a tiller from a halyard or the theory behind wind pressure that made it all happen but never the less I had become a sailor.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2019
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  5. Teleguy61

    Teleguy61 Friend of Leo's

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    The mathematical relationships in music are wonderful and fascinating, and sound great.
    They can be an inducement to better understand math.
     
  6. Teleguy61

    Teleguy61 Friend of Leo's

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    Exactly!
    And when you see the scale patterns begin to appear on the fingerboard, as you play, and you begin to see the repeatability, up and down the neck and across the fingerboard, it is so exciting.
    Also mind and ear opening.
     
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  7. SixStringSlinger

    SixStringSlinger Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    And you don't even have to know what any of it is called ;)
     
  8. Beachbum

    Beachbum Friend of Leo's

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    In the words of Jimmie Buffet. "Math sucks."
     
  9. Mjark

    Mjark Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    I'm not good at math either. Seems to me the math is the physics part of sound waves and string vibration not theory so much. 9ths, 11ths, and 13ths are just adding 7 to the 2nd 4th or 6th. Look at a chord everyone uses like E9 (X7677X) the second note in the the key of E is F# 7 + 2 is 9.
     
  10. String Tree

    String Tree Doctor of Teleocity

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    Ear to Brain.
    Hands to Guitar.
     
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  11. noah330

    noah330 Friend of Leo's

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    You could use the phrygian as an altered dominant in a ii V I. The cool thing about doing that is you wouldn't fall into the dorian, mixo, ionian thing that's a little more common.

    I've been in sessions and gotten extra money arranging other parts because having a great ear is one thing but being able to quickly come up with something for another instrument to play (for example, strings or horns) and being able to write it out correctly is something that gets someone like me call backs or extra sidelines. Being able to do that without needing a guitar or piano is something that's really been valuable to me. Even if its not the best part it can make me more valuable to the person hiring me.

    I don't know what studying "music theory" means. I've never taken a "music theory" class or read any music theory books. I've taken harmony classes, ear training classes and arranging classes.

    When I was a kid I played by ear and figured out things from records and what I could get people to show me. If nothing else learning how to read/write correctly gives you access to so much more information and gives you more ways to communicate with other musicians.

    My 11 year old is learning to play over changes. It's fun to watch his progress and see him start to get the hang of it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2019
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  12. ndcaster

    ndcaster Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    beautiful, and true
     
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  13. TC6969

    TC6969 Friend of Leo's

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    I played with a guy a few months ago who was one of the best songwriters and guitar players I've ever worked with.

    He walked over to me and said "I'm putting my capo right here". (Third fret)

    I said "That's G. E-F-F#-G".

    He said "I dont know about any of that."
     
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  14. WetBandit

    WetBandit Friend of Leo's

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    That guy is me! (Not me literally, but me nonetheless)
     
  15. galaxiex

    galaxiex Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    You need to get the book "Plane Talk" by Kirk Lorange.
    Trust me. Google search it.
     
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  16. WetBandit

    WetBandit Friend of Leo's

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    Is it weird to say (and think) I just feel it?

    I've noticed that I only seem to learn something new when I feel it.

    For instance, I was trying to learn some old Shadows songs like Apache and whatnot a while back, and as soon as I could feel the music, I could play it.

    Does that make any sense at all?

    I'm starting to consider insanity.
     
  17. WetBandit

    WetBandit Friend of Leo's

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    That's 100 bones for a paperback! It had better be good cause it's in my Amazon cart.... and we're at defcon 2!
     
  18. galaxiex

    galaxiex Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    Yes it's not cheap but the info in it is priceless.
    It will take your understanding of the guitar and theory to a new level that is, or should be, easily understood for someone that doesn't know theory.

    Trust me. :)
     
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  19. Hastings

    Hastings Tele-Meister

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    Paul's father played a lot of dance hall (Vaudeville-type) piano music around the house, and Paul grew up around that. He was not formally educated, but he was educated.

    "McCartney's father was a trumpet player and pianist, who had led Jim Mac's Jazz Band in the 1920s. He kept an upright piano in the front room, encouraged his sons to be musical and advised McCartney to take piano lessons. However, McCartney preferred to learn by ear.[14][nb 1] When McCartney was 11, his father encouraged him to audition for the Liverpool Cathedral choir, but he was not accepted. McCartney then joined the choir at St Barnabas' Church, Mossley Hill.[17] McCartney received a nickel-plated trumpet from his father for his fourteenth birthday, but when rock and roll became popular on Radio Luxembourg, McCartney traded it for a £15 Framus Zenith (model 17) acoustic guitar, since he wanted to be able to sing while playing.[18]"
    Wikipedia
     
  20. noah330

    noah330 Friend of Leo's

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    If that’s the best guitar player you ever worked with I kind of feel sorry for you.

    The guy probably sounds great and writes his own stuff but chances are I wouldn’t want to call him to sub on a standards date or play on something out of his wheelhouse.

    I’m not knocking anyone who doesn’t agree with me. I’m just saying for myself the more I can learn the better I play. The basics of harmony, arranging and ear training are not difficult, they just take a little time to catch on to and that knowledge opens up a big world.
     
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