Soldering iron question

Discussion in 'Amp Central Station' started by mefgames, Apr 23, 2019.

  1. mefgames

    mefgames Tele-Afflicted Platinum Supporter

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    I have a Hakku 700 watt variable soldering iron. The directions in a build I was reading up on said you just need a 35 watt iron. What's up with that ? Is the 700 overkill or are there other factors ?
     
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  2. 24 track

    24 track Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

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    if its verable just turn it down , the 700 watts is the current draw at full force, like a hair drier may be 1200 watts I run my irons on about 250C not too hot but enough to make a fast , hot hit and get out of there, you dont have to go whole hog on the soldering with the iron on full bore.
     
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  3. magicfingers99

    magicfingers99 Tele-Afflicted

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    you paid for it, use all the watts all the time. see if you can use a stepup transformer to get 220v and run it at 1400 watts, you can solder a tiger to a glacier with that kind of power.

    brag about it to your friends, at parties or whenever they start talking about their kids...

    also you can make toast in about 2.3 seconds,lf you are in a hurry for breakfast.

    35 watts, thats not even worth plugging in your iron for.

    That 700 watt unit can probably pull that much power out of the atmosphere on a dry staticy day, without even being plugged in.

    thats a man soldering iron, use it proudly.
     
  4. Hobs

    Hobs Tele-Meister

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    Cheap soldering irons just run wide open, at their rated wattage. The temperature just is whatever it happens to be. So a 50W iron is hotter than a 35W iron, but there are no guarantees what the actual temperature is for either one.
    A proper soldering station uses a thermostat control to set the tip temperature, and controls the heating element to maintain that temperature. The station uses only as much power as necessary to maintain the set temperature. This makes it a much better tool for just about any small to medium soldering job.
     
  5. john_cribbin

    john_cribbin Tele-Afflicted

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    Is it one with a hot air blower and soldering iron? The blower probably runs at 700 watts and the soldering iron 50 watts possibly.
     
  6. King Fan

    King Fan Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

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    It ain't the watts you're setting, it's the temp. Think dimmable light bulb. The 250°C mentioned above is about 500°F, which is a good starting point. (Standard tin-lead solder melts at 188C = 370F; eutectic 63/37 melts at 183C = 361F, so of course all soldering irons are 'hot enough' to melt solder.)

    The reason a good iron is temp variable is so you can decide to heat slow or fast, and so you can be sure of the temp you're getting. Heating fast can actually protect nearby components from overheating. I like to do standard amp work at about 650°F to get the work hot in 1-2 sec. For bigger heating jobs (like ¼ phone plugs, or the eyelet on my PR with I think 7 leads in it) I go to 750. For delicate leads and sensitive components (great example: styrene caps) I'll go down to 600.

    Beside temp setting and watts (potential energy transfer per unit time) the other variables are conduction (basically tip size and contact patch -- the tiny dab of solder you allow between tip and work) and heat reserve (the mass of the heat reservoir behind the tip). This is why chassis work (and stained glass, and industrial soldering) take much beefier tips and reservoirs. But when you look at these big boys, you see they're like 100w. So back to the beginning, it isn't watts we're (directly) interested in.
     
  7. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

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    I'm inclined to agree. I think the description is being mis-read, with temperature (Fahrenheit) being mistaken for watts.

    The other possibility (as mentioned above) is that it's a 700W "soldering/desoldering workstation" with a 700W hot air blower. The soldering iron on these units is usually around 45W.
     
  8. eMGee

    eMGee Friend of Leo's

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    700 is just the model number. Specs I've found online show the power rating at 125W.
     
  9. clintj

    clintj Friend of Leo's

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    My favorite irons are high powered with good control over temperature. When they idle, they use just a few watts to stay warm. When you ask for them to do a big job like a pot casing, they ramp up the wattage to keep the tip good and hot for good heat transfer and quick work. Underpowered irons that can't maintain temperature lead to poor joints and damaged components.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
     
  10. Paul G.

    Paul G. Friend of Leo's

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    I'm assuming there is a temperature control on it? If so set it to about 675-700 degrees F (or 350-375 degrees C if you're going to be like that) for amp work. Your high-watt iron will heat your work quickly, so count to 3, add solder and when it flows onto your connection, pull the iron away.

    Any iron with a thermostatic temperature control is better than one without. Good technique and practice beats everything.
     
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  11. kbold

    kbold Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

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    That would be Hakko, not Hakku. (Typo error)
    One of the better brands of soldering equipment.
     
  12. bblumentritt

    bblumentritt Tele-Afflicted Platinum Supporter

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    This.
     
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