Single Biggest Frustration With Guitar Soloing...

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by JonasTamas, May 23, 2019.

  1. JonasTamas

    JonasTamas TDPRI Member

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    I think it's a cool problem to have because you must be a really good player then who is gigging and active. Cool stuff! The rhythm/solo change will getting smoother for sure.
     
  2. Strat Jacket

    Strat Jacket Tele-Meister

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    My biggest boondoggle is not knowing where the notes are on the scale. I think I have some really good phrasing, technique and style, and not having my scales memorized allows me to float around without boxing myself into pentatonic, aeolian, phrygian, etc (which a lot of players clearly do!) but when wandering the fretboard, I will occasionally hit the wrong note as a result and it makes me cringe. Ruins a perfect jam every time.
     
  3. JonasTamas

    JonasTamas TDPRI Member

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    The silence is such an important part of our phrases, sometimes I experiment with lots of rests and just a few notes. It seems to work each time. :)

    Eric Clapton is a legend for sure!
     
  4. JonasTamas

    JonasTamas TDPRI Member

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    David Gilmour is my all time favorite! I have lots of inspirations but if I had to name just one, then it's DG. Yes, the nuances of his playing are the hardest to learn or copy. And it's amazing that he is using mostly minor pentatonic or natural minor scales, and yet he can paint thousands of colors.
     
  5. Throttleneck

    Throttleneck Tele-Afflicted

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    It is funny because I just discovered this last weekend and have been playing with it this week. It is harder to hit the right spot for the 6th fret B but the 7th fret E provides a really nice feel. I just sent my son a video showing him this!
     
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  6. JonasTamas

    JonasTamas TDPRI Member

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    In my experience, it can be solved by focusing to the rhythm of your motifs. Clever rhythm is the secret ingredient of any great solo in my opinion. Do you practice "borrowing" rhythmic phrases from your favorites and using them on backing tracks, with different notes and intervals? It can help a lot to develop solid phrases.
     
  7. JonasTamas

    JonasTamas TDPRI Member

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    Tapping is great to create fast lines. Maybe 3-notes-per-string legato lines (e.g. Satriani) could be the next logical step, but it is just a guess of me without hearing your solo of course.
     
  8. JonasTamas

    JonasTamas TDPRI Member

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    Often times I see solos as movies: we can have different scenes/episodes in a movie and in a solo as well. So if you start your solo with the song's main melody then you can use some variations of it and then you can add a totally contrasting new episode by playing some patterns. So in and itself it is not a bad thing what you are describing. The key is that after some patterns you can continue with the rhythm of your starting melody but with totally different intervals. This could be the second "half" of the solo. And in a good movie there are a lot of episodes, and the only thing that ties them together is the storyline. In music, the storyline could be starting from a lower string and getting to the soaring highs when you reach the end of the solo.
     
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  9. Cheap guitar guy

    Cheap guitar guy Tele-Meister

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    Yes to this. I am the same way. I put this killer solo through my head and then can't play it. What I started to do is record me humming it or whatever to catch it. And then I sit down and try and transpose it. Problem is getting the whole thing hummed out. At least for me.
     
  10. JonasTamas

    JonasTamas TDPRI Member

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    The groove of the specific song or the groove of playing guitar on that day?
     
  11. JonasTamas

    JonasTamas TDPRI Member

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    That's already a very high level of musicianship, congrats! And that's the ultimate goal of any musician what you've just described.
     
  12. JonasTamas

    JonasTamas TDPRI Member

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    For B string 6th fret (note F) you may want to experiment to bend quickly the 5th fret half step up (thus reaching this F note) and then release the bend again. So the tension of this scale degree resolves when you release the string to the E note (5th fret).
     
  13. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Nope. I'm not a really good player. I am in a band, but we only do two or three gigs a year.
     
  14. chris m.

    chris m. Poster Extraordinaire

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    I think it's great as a guitarist to spend some time on a keyboard now and then. All the notes are so easy to see, laid right out there in front of you.
    The different ergonomics also lead to different voicings and phrasings naturally coming to hand. Having "beginner's mind" on the keyboard is also not
    such a bad thing. People who have played keyboards for years also get trapped into playing the same old licks. I also have taken lots of sax and clarinet
    lessons and learned a lot from that.

    To put it another way, there's two aspects to playing a good buitar solo. One is pure musicianship-- hearing all of the parts
    and how they fit together. Beethoven was deaf but he could look at a symphony score and hear all of the parts playing together in his head. How amazing
    is that? Better yet, he could then pull out a pencil (quill pen?) and write a beautiful line that could mesh right with all of the other instruments. Boom.

    The second part is knowing the mechanics of the guitar and how to pull the notes out of it. I've been playing for 50 years but that is still a challenge for me.
    Other cats who really got on it in the right way are already there, long before I've been able to get there. So my frustration is more the mechanics and less
    the music.
     
  15. kelnet

    kelnet Telefied Ad Free Member

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    This is a good way to improve those YouTube numbers. However, Jonas, I don't see a single Telecaster in any of your videos. Time to update your YouTube channel. :)

    https://www.youtube.com/user/tamasjonas/videos?disable_polymer=1
     
  16. JonasTamas

    JonasTamas TDPRI Member

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    Here they are, four Telecaster videos on my channel. I love this guitar!

    Btw, why did you assume that I want to improve my YT views? I didn't post any of my links anywhere in this topic. If you read all my answers here, you can see that I try to give and not to get something. There is no single link in any of my answers at all...







     
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  17. 3-Chord-Genius

    3-Chord-Genius Poster Extraordinaire

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    There is video of this happening to me... a lot. Not so much the pickup switch, but not hitting the stomp box button hard enough to engage it, for some reason. The first two or three notes of my solos are finished before I realize I didn't hit the button hard enough, and it sounds like I don't know what I'm doing when I finally turn it on.
     
  18. 3-Chord-Genius

    3-Chord-Genius Poster Extraordinaire

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    I rarely stretch a solo beyond its original length for two reasons:

    1) The reason you specified, and;
    2) People just aren't that interested in guitar solos anymore. Except other guitarists.
     
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  19. 3-Chord-Genius

    3-Chord-Genius Poster Extraordinaire

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    ^THIS. Generally, I hear a melody in my head and try to get that melody to come out of the guitar. It's more interesting to the listener than a bunch of licks or patterns chained together, and I still keep a library of licks in my head in case I have a brain freeze.
     
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  20. -Hawk-

    -Hawk- Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I’m always on a quest to play with more speed and accuracy, but who isn’t. Other than that, I want to build solos that are compelling to listeners. I don’t necessarily agree that people aren’t interested in guitar solos. I think people get bored quickly of solos that don’t grab them emotionally like a good vocal or rhythm.
     
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