Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Shifted bridge, short-scale 'tele'

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by Honza992, Oct 19, 2017.

  1. Bugeater281

    Bugeater281 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    26
    173
    Nov 30, 2016
    Omaha
    I glue everything on a granite slab, it can always be cleaned off.
     

  2. Honza992

    Honza992 TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

    Age:
    47
    83
    Aug 6, 2015
    Nottingham, UK
    Today I routed the body to shape. Or more accurately I bandsawed to as close as I could, then sanded to the line, then used the mother of all guided 4 blade router bits with a 1mm oversize bearing to rout to within 0.5mm of the template, then changed bearing to take off the last 0.5mm. Even if I say so myself it works a treat. No tearout at all. It takes me a good 2 hours from start to finish - I try and take off tiny amounts with the router otherwise it scares the living daylights out of me.

    [​IMG]
    More annoying is the minor blemish on the top horn has turned into the stain from hell. :( My plan initially was to keep the finishing as simple as possible. I'm building this for me, it's my first guitar build and the first guitar I will ever actually own. So I was going to wipe on a few coats of Tru Oil and call it done. What with that stain though, my OCD will go into overdrive everytime I pick the damn thing up if I just leave it like that.

    3 options. If anyone has any advice I would really really appreciate it.

    1. Do a sort of burst using tru-oil. Add some brown transtint to tru oil and apply this to the sides, then 'burst' into pure tru oil on the front/back. Is this possible? Can you add tint to tru oil? Does the plan sound plausible?

    2. Try to bleach the stain. I've only tried bleaching ash once with this, and it was a complete waste of time. Made no discernable difference whatsoever...
    [​IMG]

    3. Stop mucking about and do a proper ash/butterscotch finish. Albeit I'll have to do it waterbased, cos I don't want to spray Nitro. And I've never done a coloured finish before, and this was not the buld I was going to pop that particular cherry.....

    Does anyone have any ideas?
     

  3. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

    Mar 27, 2012
    Calgary, Alberta
    Just say it's spalted... Have you tried sanding it at all? I'm wondering how deep and what stained it. I did a sort of blonde finish with water based lacquer on the first Tele I built. It's more white/cream than blonde though but my excuse is that was quite a few guitars ago and I've learned a lot since... The good thing with a blonde finish is that the edges get completely covered and the rest is more transparent so you would cover it up. I've never used Tru-oil so I can't answer your question on tinting.
     

  4. HairyChapter

    HairyChapter TDPRI Member

    Age:
    36
    46
    Feb 11, 2014
    Göteborg, Sweden
    It should be possible to tint tru-oil using linseedoil based artist paint. 1510100860577.jpg

    This is not mine and I should say I haven't tried it myself. I stained the wood with wood dye and added tru-oil on top of that.. Seemed easier somehow, but it is possible
     

  5. Honza992

    Honza992 TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

    Age:
    47
    83
    Aug 6, 2015
    Nottingham, UK
    Just say it's spalted....ha ha I like that! Oddly enough my neighbour in the next workshop said that it looked like a birth mark and she really liked it. Gave it personality, or something. I'm not sure I'm convinced though....:)

    It's too deep to sand. So maybe a Mary Kaye Blonde would be good. I'm not sure though whether the grain has got quite enough 'personality' for a semi-opaque finish, it's a bit straight-grained.....Dilemas dilemas...
     

  6. Honza992

    Honza992 TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

    Age:
    47
    83
    Aug 6, 2015
    Nottingham, UK
    Thanks Hairy! I think it's time to do some experimentation.....
     

  7. Honza992

    Honza992 TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

    Age:
    47
    83
    Aug 6, 2015
    Nottingham, UK
    A bit more of an update. The fretboard is glued on so time to cut fret and nut slots. Fret slots are cut on a radial arm saw...
    [​IMG]

    Then the nut slot I cut with this monster, which is a cross-cut blade which cuts a flat bottom channel. It does a fantastically clean job and takes about 10 seconds...(clearly with guard put back on before I go anywhere near the on/off switch!)
    [​IMG]

    A gratuitous shot of rosewood:
    [​IMG]

    Then finally today I thinned the headstock down to 14mm using an mdf jig and my handheld router:
    [​IMG]
     

  8. Honza992

    Honza992 TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

    Age:
    47
    83
    Aug 6, 2015
    Nottingham, UK
    Did you do a build thread for that one? If not would you be able to say roughly what your process was? Lots of info about nitro finishing and virtually none on waterbase..... Thanks for your input.
     

  9. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

    Mar 27, 2012
    Calgary, Alberta
    No I didn't make a thread. That was my first scratch build and it was really rough. I do gig it though and love playing it. By reading up on blonde finishes here and on YouTube they all said the same thing. The sides are a more solid color while the back and front are opaque.

    The one I made is swamp ash. I sprayed sanding sealer first then grain filled with dark tinted drywall putty. Sanded flat with 220 grit then mixed a very thin white with a few drops of amber aniline dye. Sprayed it on then a bunch of clear coats. I let it sit a week and buffed it up. It's a poor representation of a blonde but it's what I started learning with. I sprayed too much color on the front and back so not enough grain shows through - at least to my liking. I've never sprayed nitro and I really like working with waterbase lacquer. I find it's very forgiving like for burn in, comes out crystal clear and the clean up is a breeze - water.
     

  10. Honza992

    Honza992 TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

    Age:
    47
    83
    Aug 6, 2015
    Nottingham, UK
    I'm doing neck bolts rather than screws on this build. We go to Italy a lot so I'm hoping this will be a guitar I take with me, so it's likely to have the neck taken on and off lots of times, hence the bolts. I forgot to take photos so most of these are from my last bass build, process is exactly the same.

    First I clamp the body down to the drill press, then use a 15mm forstner for the string ferrules. Then without moving the drill or the body I drilled 4mm holes through the body so they are concentric. I then put the body/neck vertically in a vice and twiddled a 4mm brad point to leave an indentation on the neck to mark the hole for the threaded inserts.
    [​IMG]
    Using a radius block as support I then drilled 8mm holes for the threaded inserts. The inserts themselves I then put onto some threaded rod and put this into my drill press. Turning the drill press by hand pushes the inserts into the neck while making sure they stay at 90 degrees to the horizontal. I've never been able to get the inserts in straight just doing it freehand, so the drill press is invaluble.
    [​IMG]

    Time for a test fit....
    [​IMG]
    Spot on :cool:

    Note to self: Must check vacuum bag for the last of the silver neck ferrules:mad:
     
    AAT65 and darkforce like this.

  11. Honza992

    Honza992 TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

    Age:
    47
    83
    Aug 6, 2015
    Nottingham, UK
    Next up I drilled holes for the bridge and the string through. The ferrules on the back were more tricky.

    Normally I copy the technique that Fletcher uses here:


    The string ferrules I've got though are 10mm and the only 10mm bit I've got is a brad point, so too long to be able to get in and out of the drill press without moving anything. The second problem was that the holes drilled in the Wilkinson bridge that I'm going to use weren't exactly even. It's not problem on the front, half a mm here or there won't be noticeable under the bridge. On the back though, the gap between each ferrule is under 2mm, so everything has to be spot on or the eye will immediately be able to pick up that the ferrules aren't spaced properly.

    So, first I made a template with 3.3mm holes in some scrap PVC. I then stuck that to some scrap MDF and used Fletchers method to make equidistant 10mm holes, the size of the ferrules.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    I then used the MDF template to drill the 10mm holes to a depth of 1.5mm for the 'lip'. The 10mm brad leaves a indentation at the bottom of the hole (from the 'point' of the brad point) and I was able to use this to centre the 8mm brad point drill bit I was using to drill the inner hole. Using one brad point to centre another brad point isn't a technique I've used before, or indeed ever seen before, but it worked really well. The 8mm hole was absolutely centred on the 10mm:
    [​IMG]

    Well chuffed:p
     
    Kriticaster and darkforce like this.

  12. Honza992

    Honza992 TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

    Age:
    47
    83
    Aug 6, 2015
    Nottingham, UK
    Cheers Ricky. I've orded some white Mixol pigment and I've already got some amber transtint. Sounds like a solution:)
     

  13. Kriticaster

    Kriticaster TDPRI Member

    Age:
    40
    24
    Nov 5, 2017
    Crete, Greece
    Oh this sounds and looks like a brilliant project!!

    Subbed!
     

  14. Honza992

    Honza992 TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

    Age:
    47
    83
    Aug 6, 2015
    Nottingham, UK
    Thanks Kriticaster, I'm enjoying it!
     

  15. Honza992

    Honza992 TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

    Age:
    47
    83
    Aug 6, 2015
    Nottingham, UK
    Not much action today other than routing the neck taper using one of Bruce Johnson's ingenious super-simple jigs...
    [​IMG]
    Then one last check of fret slot depths (using fret saw & depth stop which I've checked on scrap for depth) before fretting.
    [​IMG]
     

  16. Honza992

    Honza992 TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

    Age:
    47
    83
    Aug 6, 2015
    Nottingham, UK
    One more thing was checking how the neck pocket & bolts have affected the centre line. I put a set square at the scale length position then use two straight edges to check. The figures I used to calculate cutting out the neck were 54mm string spacing and a total of 7mm for the gaps either side high and low Es, giving a total of 61mm - ie the two straight edges should line up with 30.5mm on either side of the centre line. I was very happy to see one at exactly 30.5mm and the other at 31mm. An error of 0.5mm is perfectly acceptable, to me anyway. Probably pencil and ruler is never going to get that much more accurate.
    [​IMG]
     
    RogerC likes this.

  17. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

    Mar 27, 2012
    Calgary, Alberta
    When you get a bridge on and can string up the 2 E strings there is always a little wiggle room in the neck if you have to get the strings to line up with the neck taper. It doesn't take much of a push either side.. Really nice work BTW.
     

  18. Honza992

    Honza992 TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

    Age:
    47
    83
    Aug 6, 2015
    Nottingham, UK
    Thanks Ricky. Tomorrow the neck carve starts, the really fun part!
     

  19. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

    Mar 27, 2012
    Calgary, Alberta
    My favorite part of the build!
     

  20. Honza992

    Honza992 TDPRI Member Silver Supporter

    Age:
    47
    83
    Aug 6, 2015
    Nottingham, UK
    I'd love to be one of those builders that can do a neck with no plan, no lines, just vision, inspiration and no doubt years and years of experience. I have none of the above so I stick hard and fast to the facet method.

    So first up draw the lines and select my weapon of choice...
    [​IMG]
    Here I'm part way through the first facet. One technique that I find really useful to run a pencil lead along a partially cut facet so I can see exactly how much more I need to take off.
    [​IMG]

    Here's the first facet done. I start with a shinto saw rasp, then move to rasps and finally a spokeshave to make the facets as flat as possible. My thinking is that each facet becomes a reference point for the next one, so the flatter and more even the facets are, the less sanding there is to do at the end, which I hate!
    [​IMG]

    I do 4 sets of facets in total, then take the edges off with a spoke shave, then 'shoe shine' with a blunt rasp, then shoe shine with 120 grit. But that's for another day......
     
    zorgzorg2 and Kriticaster like this.

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