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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Sharpening / regrinding router bits

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by GunsOfBrixton, Dec 5, 2017.

  1. GunsOfBrixton

    GunsOfBrixton Tele-Afflicted

    Dec 9, 2011
    Rochester, NY
    A quick question. Anyone here ever sent out a spiral router bit to be resharpened? I just bought some new whiteside bits because the old ones were not cutting as easily as before. But it is really only the ends that are not as sharp. It looks like it costs about $10 to $15 per bit plus shipping. Might be cost effective to have it done to have some backups. thoughts? experiences?
     

  2. adirondak5

    adirondak5 Wood Hoarder Extraordinaire Ad Free + Supporter

    Oct 24, 2009
    Long Island NY
    I've not had any spirals resharpened Robert . I get quite a bit of use out of my most used .250 diameter or .375 diameter bits (Whiteside's) before they start showing any signs of dulling , but I do save The dull ones after the new bits get brought out , maybe I'll try and get a few reground and see if they hold up and are still near original dimensions diameter wise . I usually try to keep new spares on the smaller more reasonably priced bits like the .250 EM's or .375EM's . Resharpening might be an option , just haven't given it a lot of thought .
     

  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    I had Jackson Saw sharpen one of my stewmac bits once. It came back undersize...understandably. The bit was sharp, but left a ridge when used in multiple passes. I only did that once.
     

  4. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

    Jun 22, 2010
    Osaka, Japan
    I wonder if there's a way that they could grind the bearings to match...
     
    ndeli55 likes this.

  5. adirondak5

    adirondak5 Wood Hoarder Extraordinaire Ad Free + Supporter

    Oct 24, 2009
    Long Island NY
    I think that would be my main concern with resharpening . I could go into the tool database in my CAM software and change diameters of resharpened bits but it would seem to be a PIA to have different diameters for the same size/type of bit and be confusing in use on the CNC .
     
    guitarbuilder likes this.

  6. GunsOfBrixton

    GunsOfBrixton Tele-Afflicted

    Dec 9, 2011
    Rochester, NY
    I was thinking of stopping by there (not to far from my house now) and talking to them about how they do it. What equipment they use.

    thanks. I have actually spent some time researching it, just wanted to see if anyone here had any experience. (good or bad)

    I believe that they can and do. But the bits I would have done do not have bearings.

    I would only be sending in my 1/2" diameter bits. So, even if they are slightly smaller I could still use them as a backup and of course set the new diameter when generating tool paths. The big thing would be to properly label the tools and the files so I know which ones to use. :) But even if you mixed them up, the worst thing that could happen as far as I see is that the neck pocket would be slightly undersized. Not a deal breaker.


    The main reason to do this would be to save a bit of money as a hobbyist. If I was making a living at this, I would build the cost of bits into the projects. But when you look at the cost of a 1/2" whiteside downcut spiral with a 2" cutting length ($60+) and compare that with the cost of getting one reground / resharpened (Lets say $15) then it makes sense. Obviously you want to find a shop that does quality work. I did see that Freud has shops that they call "Certified Sharpening Service Centers". I also found one shop that will actually cut a little bit of the end off the bit and remake the new end to the original geometry. Which means the diameter doesnt change. (since for what I do, most of the real cutting happens in the first 1/4" and the rest of the bit is still extremely sharp) ) So, I could take that 2" cutting length bit and have them take off 1/4".

    I think I will have it done once I determine where to send them. Thanks for the replies!
     

  7. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

    Feb 17, 2009
    London, UK
    Instead of using the resharpened bits as backups, you could use them as your primary removal bits, being undersized these will get you close to the final shape, and you can use your new sharp bits to make the final cut taking off that last few thousandths... I read that here somewhere
     
    Jupiter likes this.

  8. GunsOfBrixton

    GunsOfBrixton Tele-Afflicted

    Dec 9, 2011
    Rochester, NY
    I sort of do this now. I tell the toolpaths to leave a little bit on the initial passes (taking shallower cuts) then that little bit is removed taking deeper cuts (thus using more.of the sharper edge) but the bit is only cutting very little at this point. For the body edge cutting I could even do the full depth of cut in one pass if I wanted to and the bit would have no problem.
     

  9. Mat UK

    Mat UK Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

    Feb 17, 2009
    London, UK
    Ahh, we're talking CNC... not my domain. Ignore and carry on!
     

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