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rockabilly basic (broken) chords?!

Discussion in 'Tab, Tips, Theory and Technique' started by steveyo2010, Nov 26, 2010.

  1. steveyo2010

    steveyo2010 TDPRI Member

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    hello,

    i search for the rockabilly basic chords, when the guitar play broken chords, what option have it?

    thanks!
     
  2. delb0y

    delb0y Tele-Meister

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  3. steveyo2010

    steveyo2010 TDPRI Member

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    thanks but witch chords i play at rockabilly style? i see the play many with the pinky but what is it?? can you help?
     
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  5. delb0y

    delb0y Tele-Meister

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    Steve, any particular rockabilly song you've got in mind?
     
  6. motwang

    motwang Tele-Afflicted

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    Check out Mystery Train! Look on YouTube , there some helpful tips of how to play this and get you started!
     
  7. Open G Tele

    Open G Tele Tele-Meister

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  8. steveyo2010

    steveyo2010 TDPRI Member

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    i mean the typical sun recordstime chords the play all rockabilly bands, most of time i think they play 7er or 9er with the pinky? but the play more and differents postion, maybe you can help me and show or say me what are so the typical chords for rockabilly, i dont need a key, any key or E....
     
  9. BoogerRooger

    BoogerRooger Poster Extraordinaire

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    Not sure if this is what you mean but this is what did it for me. I wanted to learn rockabilly type hybrid picking. I play the bass notes with the pick and the top ones with my fingers.

    I got this off the internet a while back (I forget where, so apologies for giving no credit) and after loads of practice I got it and the door has opened. When you get used to the alternating bass or pedalling on the bass notes, you can use your pinky on your left hand to finger the melody lines (as you say to add 7ths, 6ths, 9ths or whatever) just play around with it. Hope this helps, good luck!

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    As for fingerpicking, here are a few basic patterns that lay a rockabilly fingerpicking foundation. If you play these patterns enough, the door will open.

    At the lowest level you're dealing with an alternating bass played with the thumb:

    ---------------------------------------------
    ---------------------------------------------
    ---------------------------------------------
    -------2-----------2-----------2-----------2-
    ---------------------------------------------
    -0-----------0-----------0-----------0-------

    A variation on that:

    ---------------------------------------------
    ---------------------------------------------
    ---------------------------------------------
    -------2-----------2-----------2-----------2-
    -------------2-----------------------2-------
    -0-----------------------0-------------------

    Using the basic alternating bass, add in syncopated notes with the index playing those on the B string, and the middle for the e string. The rhythm swings a lot; it's not even like the tab suggests.

    ----------0-----------0-----------0----------
    ----0-----------0-----------0-----------0----
    ---------------------------------------------
    -------2-----------2-----------2-----------2-
    ---------------------------------------------
    -0-----------0-----------0-----------0-------

    Here's the last pattern. The main effect is the heavy beat where the two notes are played together (pinched) instead of syncopated.

    -------0-----------------
    ----------------0--------
    -------------------------
    -------2-----------2-----
    -------------------------
    -0-----------0-----------

    You can play these patterns through each chord change-- just change which strings you play for the bass notes (ie, on an open E chord, you play the 6th and 4th string. on the open A7 and open B7, use the 5th and 3rd strings). Just do that to start. As you get used to the patterns you'll find what strings you like to hit and when, and you'll start adding in other notes as well.
     
  10. goz211

    goz211 Tele-Meister

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    Thanks for the link

    Thanks for that. New site to me. I'm going to have a go at the magic chords lesson.
     
  11. davidge1

    davidge1 Friend of Leo's

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    I think you might be talking about an E9 chord, which you can add an extra tone to with your pinky, like this:

    --7----9---7----------------------------------------
    --7----7---7----------------------------------------
    --7----7---7----------------------------------------
    --6----6---6----------------------------------------
    --7----7---7----------------------------------------
    -------------------------------------------------

    When you add the high note, you can strum just the top part of the chord if you want. You don't have to strum the full chord. Is this the "broken chord" sound you're talking about?

    Of course, you can move this chord shape anywhere on the neck to change it from an E chord to another chord.
     
  12. WaylonFan76

    WaylonFan76 Poster Extraordinaire

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    My favorite thing from that site : "Ronnie Earl: 'Music is not a sport, there's no competition'"
    To OP : if you can find serious tabs of Scotty Moore's stuff, you'd be pretty much set up. I have the tab book for Elvis' SUN Sessions, that pretty much all you need. :cool:
     
  13. Axis29

    Axis29 Friend of Leo's

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    To move the chords around you have to know a little bit about what notes make up the chords... and where to find the root notes (which then lead to the other parts of the chords)

    Rockabilly players rely pretty heavily on 6ths, 7ths and 9th chords... Dominant 7ths (major 3rd and flatted, or minor, 7th) are very, very common, then 9ths and 6ths added for jazzy tastiness.

    The basic G7 bar chord

    ----3----
    ----3----
    ----4----
    ----3----
    ----5----
    ----3----

    Can be moved all over the neck... the notes that make up this chord are: G, B, D, E

    Find these notes in any combination or to play a partial chord, really the two most important notes are the major 3rd (B) and the b7 (E) by playing just those two you can imply the full chord, but if you grab something like:

    ---7--- the B (3rd)
    ---8--- the E (b7th)
    ---9--- the G (Root)
    ---X---
    ---X---

    You're there...

    Now, move other 9th and 7th chords around and you'll find all kinds of quick moves. Then slide up or down one or two frets into it at the beginning of the measure and you're really onto something!
     
  14. Axis29

    Axis29 Friend of Leo's

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    Wait, I was wrong! Waaaay wrong!!!!

    G7 chord diagram at the third fret is correct.

    G7 up on the fretboard:

    ---7--- B (3rd)
    ---6--- F (b7)
    ---7--- D (5)
    ---X---
    ---X---

    Musta been around too many paint fumes earlier this afternoon, Sorry!
     
  15. basher

    basher Tele-Afflicted

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    Hey, thanks for putting this link up. Great stuff!
     
  16. Tele295

    Tele295 Poster Extraordinaire

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    There are lots of neat rockabilly chords.

    Take Axis29's G7 above, spelled xxx767. You can make this into a diminished chord by adding one note (xx6767), and it gets really Setzer-like. Diminished chords repreat every minor 3rd, so you could do a run over a G7 as x x 6 7 6 7 / / / x x 10 11 10 11/ / / x x 13 14 13 14 / / /. That run would be fun if you were playing a song in C, because you could resolve into a C6/9 at the 15th fret ( x x 14 14 15 15 - see below)

    Since we are working with that G7, let's stick with some examples in G. Transpose these chords as necessary.

    Carl Perkins and Scotty Moore would often play a G7 as 353433, then hammer on the pinky to make it 353463. Good Rockin' Tonight, Blue Suede Shoes, etc etc.

    Here's a fun G9 chord that has a real Bill Haley feel: x x 15 14 12 15.

    Cliff Gallup really hung on those 6/9 chords. In G, you could play it as xx2233 or xx 9 9 10 10.

    Danny Gatton often used this as a rockabilly power chord: x 14 15 14 x 15. It's kinds like the Bill Haley chord above.

    Rockabilly songs often end on a 6, 6/9, or 13 chord. See the Cliff Gallup part above for 6/9 voicings. Regular old 6 chord in G would be

    3x5453 (use the top 4 notes of this for Chuck Berry's "Memphis" solo),

    and the 13th is often played as
    3x345x
     
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