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Ridgid oscillating spindle sander question

Discussion in 'The DIY Tool Shed' started by Michael A., Oct 12, 2015.

  1. Michael A.

    Michael A. Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    959
    Jan 12, 2013
    Virginia Beach, VA
    I have a chance to buy the older model inexpensively. It has a buff color body, not the orange one. Any reason to hold out for the newer model? I am unfamiliar with the evolution of these.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Mike Simpson

    Mike Simpson Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 19, 2006
    Gilbert, AZ (PHX)
    I have the grey one. Bought it for $40, works great! It was missing a few attachments but I don't need them. I really like the little oscillating belt.
    I have the older grey ridgid planer, jointer and bandsaw as well. I have heard they are better made but don't have any reference for that claim.
     
  3. guitarbuilder

    guitarbuilder Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 30, 2003
    Ontario County
    I'd say it depends on the price. For 200 dollars you get a new one with some type of guarantee. Some love it and a few dislike it. I have one and it's OK. It's not an industrial quality machine, but will do some home duty jobs quite well. The spindle part gets most of the use around here. The belt, not so much, unless the parts are under the size of the platen between the wheels. For the price it is a decent machine if you don't have access to a bigger one.
     
  4. adirondak5

    adirondak5 Wood Hoarder Extraordinaire

    Oct 24, 2009
    Long Island NY
    I agree with Marty and Mike , depends on price . I don't think it matters if gray or orange , don't hear a lot of complaints about either
     
  5. Michael A.

    Michael A. Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    959
    Jan 12, 2013
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Thanks for that. I bought it for $70. It is from maybe 2005, but was never used. Still has the sanding sleeves under the original plastic retainer. Seems to work fine. Made in USA, but maybe they all are.
     
  6. adirondak5

    adirondak5 Wood Hoarder Extraordinaire

    Oct 24, 2009
    Long Island NY
    Good score , for $70 you gotta deal
     
  7. Michael A.

    Michael A. Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    959
    Jan 12, 2013
    Virginia Beach, VA
    A couple of you have mentioned the grey machine before the current orange version. Mine seems to be even earlier, unless the grey you are referring to is the top surface. I'm not sure what color I would call the plastic body of this one, but more mustard than grey. Does this one predate the grey one?
    Serial number is 00348P****. Does that help? I can email Ridgid too.

    Were all versions made in USA, or did they go offshore for later stuff like DeWalt did?
     

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  8. Kennedycaster

    Kennedycaster Tele-Afflicted

    Apr 5, 2009
    Mesa, AZ
    The grey plastic yellows into the beige type color. I've heard the grey Ridgid tools were made by the Emerson company & are supposedly better quality, but who really knows for sure. I have the grey 13" planer & it works great.

    Bob
     
  9. Michael A.

    Michael A. Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    959
    Jan 12, 2013
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Thanks for this information, would have never known this one was grey at one time. I've sent pix and the serial number to the Ridgid customer service, which is part of Emerson, and hope to get a reply and an answer to my questions.

    Again, thanks for the reply.
     
  10. Michael A.

    Michael A. Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    959
    Jan 12, 2013
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Can anyone who owns one of these look at their machine and see if the top of the spindle looks like the one in the photo of mine? I think the top of the spindle should be threaded to accept a knob. Mine has no threads. The parts diagram shows a knob here, but I have nothing that will fit in there.

    There was no manual available when I bought this, so I had nothing to refer to at the time of purchase.

    Thanks.
     

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  11. Michael A.

    Michael A. Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    959
    Jan 12, 2013
    Virginia Beach, VA
    I went on a Ridgid forum and was able to find out that my first edition sander does not have the removable knob on the drive drum, so I no longer need anybody to respond on this. I was also able to find a parts diagram for the earliest model. Unfortunately, there was a spring loose inside the plastic body of the sander, so now I have to figure out how to take it apart and reinstall that spring.

    If anyone else has happened to have worked inside the earliest series (EB44240) and can say if it is readily disassembled and reassembled, that information would be helpful.
    Please PM as I know this thread is of very limited interest. Thanks.
     
  12. Mike Simpson

    Mike Simpson Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Mar 19, 2006
    Gilbert, AZ (PHX)
    I have not worked on mine so I can't help on the spring. Mine has little knobs on top. ImageUploadedByTDPRI1444881352.789570.jpg
     
  13. Michael A.

    Michael A. Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    959
    Jan 12, 2013
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Mike
    Thanks for the reply. Mine is earlier, the knob over the drive spindle is one of the improvements that Ridgid implemented after problems with the earliest version. On mine, so far this issue has made the belt sander unremovable. I am investigating fixes.
    M7

    If anyone has a users manual for the early unit EB44240 only, please contact me. Thanks. I have the EB44241 manual and it has information that is incorrect for my earlier USA made machine.
     
  14. Michael A.

    Michael A. Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    959
    Jan 12, 2013
    Virginia Beach, VA
    If anyone ever wondered about the guts of the motor in one of these, here you go. Mine stopped working after I was finally able to release the belt sander from the top of the unit. This is a 15 year old sander that was never used from the looks of things. The grease is still as viscous as wheel bearing grease that came out of the can today. I stopped pulling the motor apart when I could not remove the small bearing at the bottom of the motor shaft/spindle.

    Apparently grease can get on the commutator by migrating along the shaft, so I will take it apart enough to check for that and clean it up if detected. I hope I can get it running again. I want to finally get to use my "new" CL tool!
     

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  15. Davecam48

    Davecam48 Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

    Age:
    70
    Dec 31, 2009
    Queensland Australia
    Have you checked the electrical system for an open circuit, or was the motor shaft seized, or some other type fault?

    DC
     
  16. Michael A.

    Michael A. Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    959
    Jan 12, 2013
    Virginia Beach, VA
    DC
    Thanks for the reply.

    The motor is getting juice and it wants to start, making a small movement and then stopping and humming. This is without the belt sander or a sanding sleeve attached, no mechanical resistance, just the bare spindle sticking out the top of the tool. A Ridgid tool repair center owner told me to take the motor apart and check if grease had gone down the spindle from the grease cup at the bottom, which can happen I guess if the tool was turned upside down after running when the grease was warm and fluid. There is no evidence that has happened with my unit, it was only test run for a few seconds and was never upside down for more than a few minutes to remove the bottom cover of the housing. So the problem remains a mystery until I can remove the bearing and the cam parts that are in the foreground and pull the armature/commutator assembly out of the field coils and inspect and clean it.
     
  17. Michael A.

    Michael A. Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    959
    Jan 12, 2013
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Further to my posts above, I have finally figured out what was happening that was preventing my ROSS motor from running. It was the blasted bearing in the end plate, shown in the 5th picture above. As you can see, it is deteriorated, but I thought that damage had occurred mostly in me taking it apart, since it was a bit of a job to get the end plate assembly to slide off the motor spindle. However, it is an older style of bearing that has no balls or rollers inside, it has only grease impregnated felt centralizing a steel sleeve that presses on the main motor spindle. The tool had not been used much, despite being one of the oldest ones (under 7600 serial number), and the grease had dried out and the felt was falling out. So there was not enough support to keep the motor spindle centered within the bearing.

    I had a eureka moment, and with the belt sander and drum removed, turned on the switch while biasing the protruding spindle slightly to one side or the other. In some directions of bias, the motor would not work at all, in other directions, it spun fully up to speed, flinging the grease all over the inside of the tool housing!

    What this told me was that the armature/commutator assembly was not centralized in the field coil as a result of the worn bearing allowing the motor shaft to be biased in the wrong direction.

    Now I will take the end cover and bearing to a electric motor shop to see if they can install the correct felt etc, so the spindle has no side movement. If this is a dead end, I have a very helpful guy at a Ridgid repair shop looking for an old end cover in better condition. I may also look into installing a proper ball or roller bearing into the end cover.

    Note that this old bearing and end cover design was discontinued with the EB4424-1 model (mine is EB4424-0). So this info will not be relevant to most of you who have these tools. But I thought I would add this new information in case anyone else has the first series tool and encounters similar problems.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2015
  18. R. Stratenstein

    R. Stratenstein Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Aug 3, 2010
    Loganville, Ga.
    Sorry you're having so much trouble with it, but good of you to share your findings. Sounds to me like the best outcome would be to find a ball or roller bearing that fits, runs smoothly, and will give you some long service. Hope that happens soon!
     
  19. Michael A.

    Michael A. Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    959
    Jan 12, 2013
    Virginia Beach, VA
    Thanks Rick. I had done lots of Googling to try to find if others had written about these issues with the first gen ROSS units, but only found some grumblings about the very poorly designed cast metal locating sleeve shown in the dead center of the drum in my post #10. This part can also wear out in these old machines and is no longer available. I am going to try to engineer a supplemental part to keep that from happening on my machine.

    If anyone happens upon this thread while trying to fix their tool, I'm happy to share my experiences here or by PM.

    I'll post when the ROSS finally runs, then I can move on to my first proper body build. Can't wait!
     
  20. Michael A.

    Michael A. Tele-Holic Ad Free Member

    959
    Jan 12, 2013
    Virginia Beach, VA
    A hopeful solution

    Forgive me for continuing with this repair, I know it is relevant to few, but I'll complete my notes in the event it is helpful to someone else in the wood-working community.

    I took the end plate assembly to 2 bearings suppliers with no encouragement at all, and then to an electric motor repair shop. The helpful guy here told me this was a sleeve bearing and not repaired by them for over 25 years. They could have a go at $65/hour, thought it might take 2 hours! Since a new ROSS is now $150, I took the end plate home with me.

    I carefully pried off the stamped inside cap. The bearing is very simple, a rubber washer at the bottom, then an "olive" steel bearing that slides on the spindle. The olive is supposed to be held in place by the square spring steel retainer clip shown in the photo, but on mine, the clip was no longer locked into the receiving tangs on the inside diameter of the end casting. So the bearing was coming apart inside its housing! That was the source problem!

    I took out all the old packing, which was like chopped felt, and stuck it in a plastic bag with some fresh grease, and kneaded the bag until the grease was well distributed, "refreshing" the packing.

    I packed the housing with the fresh packing mix, installed the washer, and the olive, making sure the little indentations in the olive (note pic 2) were in the bearing cradle of the end housing. Then returned the spring clip by pushing it down on the clip and turning clockwise until the corners of the clip were fully engaged in the receiving tangs on the inside of the end casting. Then I added more of the packing material, and added the stamped cap.

    Voila! Once the motor was reassembled, no more side play of the spindle! I did not have time to fully reassemble the tool, but I'm very confident it will now work.

    I did use a file and some emery cloth to remove any burrs or corrosion on the motor spindle so it can move freely up and down inside the olive bearing.

    I hope the pics provide sufficient detail if you have the misfortune of needing to do this repair, but will be glad to answer any questions at any time.
     

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    Last edited: Jan 2, 2016
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