Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Reverse control plates - pros & cons, options & opin

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by Tim Bowen, Mar 31, 2003.

  1. Tim Bowen

    Tim Bowen Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    56
    Mar 17, 2003
    Atlanta/Rome, Georgia, US
    - Thinking about flipping the plate on a MIA B-Bender Tele w/ 3 pups & a 5 way switch, Strat style tip... I'm sure I'll dig the new position for the volume, my pinky wants to ride it, but is too short for the standard configuration. Wondering about how practical the new position for the tone knob & pup selector would be... seems like having the neck pup available closest to the tone control, and the bridge pup flicked further down would work for me...

    Looking at this:

    headstock > volume > tone > selector (neck>>>bridge)

    How do you set yours up? Thanks a bunch. - Tim
     

  2. GuitarJonz

    GuitarJonz Poster Extraordinaire

    Mar 16, 2003
    MA
    I tried it

    [​IMG]

    I tried it in the past, but since switched back. I found that the volume knob was getting in the way a bit, especially during vigorous strumming. Also, by moving the knob up, the location where you pick at while doing volume swells is not as trebly as when doing swells with regular knob placement. IMO, when doing pedal steel swells, you want it as trebly as possible, so you want to be picking down near trhe bridge, which is where normal knob placement allows. It's still fun to try though, and I will probably try it again, especially since now I have the big Callaham knobs.
     

  3. KenB

    KenB TDPRI Member

    23
    Mar 24, 2003
    I switched

    My control plate is reversed. I had to do it because I was often bumping the 3-way selector switch while strumming which changed the pickup selection from neck to neck+bridge or to bridge. Not cool in the middle of a song. I recently saw a photo of Sheryl Crow playing a Red Tele with the plate reversed as well.
     

  4. Kevin Nybo

    Kevin Nybo TDPRI Member

    62
    Mar 17, 2003
    Mini-Soda
    When doing this, expect the need to solder at least one longer wire into place. Since you're not simply reversing the plate, but swapping the tone and volume pot positions as well, you are distancing the area between the selector switch and volume pot.

    Unless you presently have a lot of slack wire to work with, a longer wire will be needed to connect the switch's lead to the left wiper lug on the volume pot. Right lug if yours is a left-handed guitar.

    Usually there's plenty of slack available on the center volume lug to the output jack. If not, a longer wire will be needed here as well. Of course, this distance has only been increased by about an inch here, but who knows.

    I've performed this mod at least 3 times, but it's been a while since the last. I'm sure I'm forgetting something. Anyways, the reverse configuration is the one I prefer.

    Fender does this on a couple of their Teles. The Custom Classic Tele and the Tele Sub-Sonic come wired with the reverse setup. There was also an artist model that came like this but I see it is no longer offered in the 2003 lineup. Maybe you could check out the user reviews on the 2 listed above at www.harmony-central.com. They might include whether they like or dislike the settup.
     

  5. Tim Bowen

    Tim Bowen Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    56
    Mar 17, 2003
    Atlanta/Rome, Georgia, US
    Thanks for the replies. Do you folks have any preference as to how the pickup selector is oriented? i.e. bridge > neck, versus neck > bridge.
     

  6. Kevin Nybo

    Kevin Nybo TDPRI Member

    62
    Mar 17, 2003
    Mini-Soda
    I always left mine in the standard orientation.

    Switch towards neck=neck
    Switch towards bridge=bridge

    I've just about got it memorized. :)
     

  7. Phil Jacoby

    Phil Jacoby Tele-Meister

    279
    Mar 18, 2003
    Baltimore, MD
    I always flip mine, and in fact go one better by using a plate made for a Gibson style toggle which moves in a more up-n-down direction, I find this way I can change vol, tone and PUs much quicker, with less effort on the fly. With the toggle, it is easy to change (I use my pinky) and it doesn't get anywhere near the adjacent control, so you will only switch PUs, not turn something else down too.

    A note about some MIA Teles: sometimes the cavity isn't routed as completely sthe same depth all the way over. In that case you'll have to rout the cavity to allow for the blade selector switch as they sit deep. This rout is easy to do with a say 3/4" pattern (bearing bit) but you'll need to remove the bridge and PG and all wires to give yourself a flat pltaform for the router to travel on, no template required (just follow the walls of the cavity with the bearing). Take a peek under your plate and see what you've got.
     

  8. Geo

    Geo Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    68
    Mar 17, 2003
    Hendersonville, TN
    I had that same reverse orientation on a '67 Tele
    and an Anderson Mad Cat Tele for 10 years or so
    and it was good.
    When I got other Teles later , I left them as is.
    I think I like the switch access better stock and having
    the volume next to it.
    Try it out though. If with a bender like yours, it could be
    very useful to have the volume closer for swells.
     

  9. Tim Bowen

    Tim Bowen Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    56
    Mar 17, 2003
    Atlanta/Rome, Georgia, US
    Well that's just it , Geo. I'm a pickup flicker... I know I'll love having the volume knob right there, but wonder about working the selector. I guess the way to find out is to just give it a spin. I 'll leave the '52 RI stock so I can enjoy a nice case of confusion when I swap guitars...
     

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