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Rattle can finish

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by 1bad914, Sep 12, 2017.

  1. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Age:
    66
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    That's better polish than the "car polish" I was talking about. When most mention "Rubbing compound" they mean the paste junk that comes in a flat metal container for 8 bucks or so. The stuff you used is detail-type polish and fairly close to the Colortone products.

    The cloth spinners are ok but create an awful lot of swirls if you're not extremely careful - and I don't suggest the sponge pads ever. I you are going to do much finishing you'll get far better (and faster!) results from a cheap bench-mount buffer with cloth wheels. Harbor Freight sells them. The caveats with any buffing wheel is to use only ONE compound on any wheel and change them fairly often.

    The ones you used are shot now and will probably scratch anything else you try to use them on.
     

  2. harold h

    harold h Friend of Leo's

    Feb 15, 2004


    The guitar looks fantastic. Congrats
     

  3. 1bad914

    1bad914 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    58
    183
    Nov 10, 2016
    Michigan
    What went wrong?
     

  4. dbickford

    dbickford Tele-Afflicted

    Jan 24, 2012
    Morgan, Vermont
    Nice finish on your guitar!
    A gorgeous finish can be had with a rattle can. My first attempt was with metallic lacquer. IMG_4099.JPG IMG_4208.JPG Proper surface prep,building the finish, and patient sanding will get the results.
    My second attempt was a clear lacquer gloss finish. IMG_7983.JPG IMG_7988.JPG

    Now I'm addicted. Next came Surf Green, then Shell Pink.............
     
    1bad914 likes this.

  5. 1bad914

    1bad914 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    58
    183
    Nov 10, 2016
    Michigan
    The prep is the key, if the surface is a train wreck then the paint job will be the same. I always have said that painting a car was 90% prep, 5% skill and 5% luck. You could say the same for guitars.
     

  6. YALCaster

    YALCaster Tele-Meister

    Age:
    20
    182
    Jul 24, 2017
    noitacoL
    I just didn’t have the patience, I rushed it. It looks good, but not factory.
     

  7. tonyv77

    tonyv77 Tele-Meister

    Age:
    33
    356
    Mar 24, 2009
    New Brunswick, Canada
    This is what i'm looking for! I wanted to do a rattle can color (most likely PT 2X) with wipe on poly (probably oil modified, but maybe water based). Most opinions are not experience based but best guesses on what others have said. I have limited time to strip the old finish and spray color on guitar bodies (Canadian winter is coming). I'd like to take my time with the clear coat. Wipe on poly can be done inside without any complaints.
     

  8. 2after909

    2after909 Tele-Meister

    491
    Dec 23, 2010
    brooklyn, ny
    Forgive me if I overlooked it in this thread, but would you mind letting us know which particular type of wipe on poly you used? I want to try this on an upcoming project. Looks amazing!
     

  9. Telecasterless

    Telecasterless Tele-Afflicted

    Jan 29, 2011
    los angeles
    So what do you recommend paint-wise if one wants to paint their guitar from a can? I thought I read a post where you said it was ok to use a can, but do multiple layers of very, very light coats. And don't sand between coats.

    Are you suggesting an acrylic? And then what for a top coat/clear coat?

    Are there some brands you can recommend?
     

  10. Telecasterless

    Telecasterless Tele-Afflicted

    Jan 29, 2011
    los angeles

  11. Silverface

    Silverface Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Age:
    66
    Mar 2, 2003
    Lawndale CA
    Aerosol acrylic/nitrocellulose lacquer: Mohawk/Behlens/Rust-Oleum, Valspar, Duco, U-Pol, ReRanch etc. You don't sand between coats because lacquer - even different brands, clears after colors etc - all melt into each other becoming one contiguous film. Sanding should only be done where there are small runs - and as soon as practical, like within an hour or two.

    Sanding large areas doesn't help smooth "orange" peel or lumpy areas - fixing the spray technique by shooting on practice pieces until the spray method is refined does. Sanding, instead, introduces contaminants and may get moisture in the film. And sanding at completion is only necessary of spray technique was "off" and even in a worse-case scenario should not start with anything rougher than 1500.

    And while I don't like spray enamels on guitars there shouldn't be any reason (other than small runs) to sand those either if the spray technique is correct. The flow should be smooth and even, and when done all you should have to do is polish it - if you want.
     
    Telecasterless likes this.

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