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Question on compensated tele saddles

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by Buzzgrowl, Oct 3, 2017.

  1. Buzzgrowl

    Buzzgrowl TDPRI Member

    Age:
    54
    4
    Oct 3, 2017
    Switzerland
    New here, first post on this excellent forum, great crowd!
    I recently purchased a set of Fender original parts compensated classic tele saddles (from Thomann.de). Funny thing is, all three are identical - I was under the impression that one saddle is supposed to be at a different offset to the other two. Is this correct or am I assuming wrong?
    Any comments or advice is greatly appreciated.
    Cheers, - Buzzgrowl
     

  2. RadioFM74

    RadioFM74 Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    827
    Apr 10, 2015
    Italy and Switzerland
    Hi, I just bought the exact same set, and mounted them. I haven’t been checking, but guess that each one mounts with both the slants.

    You just have to mount the middle one at the opposite angle compared to the two on the sides, and that’s it.

    BTW: they work!

    PS: that’s the most statistically bizarre thread ever on the TDPRI. Two posts, both from “Swiss” members!
     
    Chicago Matt likes this.

  3. Buzzgrowl

    Buzzgrowl TDPRI Member

    Age:
    54
    4
    Oct 3, 2017
    Switzerland
    Hi RadioFM74,
    Unfortunately, mine are not reversible as they are not plain cylinders but have about 2mm removed from the bottom in order to avail low action without shimming the neck.
    Cheers, - Buzzgrowl
     

  4. RadioFM74

    RadioFM74 Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    827
    Apr 10, 2015
    Italy and Switzerland
    Hi. I’m sure it’s the exact same part. Mine are not reversible upside down either: they have a flat bottom just as yours.

    You can however screw them on the mounting screw from both ends of their screw-hole, though. Just screw the middle one so that, when the flat part is on the bottom, the G string has a longer scale than the D string.

    Good luck!
     

  5. Piggy Stu

    Piggy Stu Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    38
    Feb 26, 2017
    Manchester UK
    It is hard to understand what you mean without pictures but any 6 saddle I ever saw looked like 2 staggered sets of steps and when I made my own compensated efforts I replicated the stagger it had when it had 6 saddles

    I don't know from what you say if yours looks like that/one needs unthreading and flipping, but did it look like this in the Thomann catalogue?
     

  6. RadioFM74

    RadioFM74 Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    827
    Apr 10, 2015
    Italy and Switzerland
    A picture to make you see what I mean. The three saddles are identical when you pull them out of the package, but you just mount the middle one differently from the other two

    IMG_3952.jpg
     

  7. LowCaster

    LowCaster Tele-Meister

    Age:
    45
    435
    Jan 24, 2011
    Paris, France
    You are right except than you need to flip one saddle upside down to reverse the slant. Screwing from one side or another doesn't change anything... ;)

    They made a mistake when packaging.

    Not so strange, it is night time in the USA.
     

  8. LutherBurger

    LutherBurger Friend of Leo's

    Oct 29, 2013
    NYC
    You are correct. Somebody must have made an error when sorting and packaging the saddles.

    Notify the retailer that you received three identical saddles, and ask for a replacement.
     
    boris bubbanov likes this.

  9. Buzzgrowl

    Buzzgrowl TDPRI Member

    Age:
    54
    4
    Oct 3, 2017
    Switzerland
    Many thanks to all for the advice! I'll give the supplier a ring and see what I can do as I am now convinced it was a packaging error.
    Cheers, Buzzgrowl
     

  10. RadioFM74

    RadioFM74 Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    827
    Apr 10, 2015
    Italy and Switzerland
    Uhmm… thinking better of it, I fear you’re right. Sorry for having posted BS, and my sympathy to @Buzzgrowl ! :oops:
     

  11. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Telefied Ad Free Member

    Yep, there was another thread where someone at FMIC messed up when collating the parts for sale.

    If you are unhappy with the mistake, best I suppose to get the vendor to put it right.

    Me, I would just find a straight saddle and use that in the middle and use a wound G string. I've seen people use slant compensated saddles on the two outboard saddles AND I have seen people use ONLY a reverse slant saddle for the middle spot (and the outboard saddles are straight ones. Every guitar has the potential to need something different.
     
    RadioFM74 and LowCaster like this.

  12. RadioFM74

    RadioFM74 Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

    827
    Apr 10, 2015
    Italy and Switzerland
    There. You start your first thread on here, first post, and you get Boris to reply… you lucky ##@?$$ :p
     

  13. LowCaster

    LowCaster Tele-Meister

    Age:
    45
    435
    Jan 24, 2011
    Paris, France
    That's nice, RadioFM74
    I have even seen a lot of people using only stock straight saddles... :)
     

  14. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    65
    Feb 3, 2017
    Foat Wuth, Texas
    And, unfortunately, not being intonated very well.
     

  15. BryMelvin

    BryMelvin Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    65
    Jan 4, 2014
    Arivaca AZ
    I've got a couple of teles with old fashioned straight saddles. I just get them close and then bend the screw with long nose pliers until intonation makes me happy.If the screws get beat up too badly after a few "adjustments" I spend 2 bucks on new screws.
     
    Jay Jernigan likes this.

  16. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    65
    Feb 3, 2017
    Foat Wuth, Texas
    Have you ever tried the compensated (3) saddles? I use a "modern" style 6-saddle bridge....don't have to bend screws or put up with almost being in tune.
     

  17. BryMelvin

    BryMelvin Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    65
    Jan 4, 2014
    Arivaca AZ
    My primary telecasters all have six saddles. But older ones I have just used the method I said rather than "upgrades". I used compensated Wilkinson and Fender compensated saddles on several guitars I built for others including one for my son as a gift. There is really no SIGNIFICANT difference I've found in using any of them except in the case of Affinity saddles (which push up and down on string at same time--a mess) and using too light strings with low break angle on six barrel style saddles which rattle.

    As someone who does a lot of amplified acoustic and classicalwork (using the whole neck!) I don't find being obsessive on intonation settings worthwhile.
     

  18. Dacious

    Dacious Friend of Leo's

    Mar 16, 2003
    Godzone
    I have a straight saddle Tele and it intonates perfectly - did it yesterday to set action and relief with Gibson Brites 0.11-50 nickel wound strings. On my tuner, within cents.

    If you get the nut cut and neck relief right, strings at 4/64". Easy as pie - takes a little patience. It involves getting intonation for the high-E, G, A strings right. Almost always that pulls low-E, D and B strings sharp. So you raise the height screw on that side - usually 1/8 turn, sometimes 1/4.

    It makes an imperceptible difference to feel when playing.

    I do have a vintage radiius with small frets. But cowboy chords, arpeggio up the neck, all plays in tune enough to gig with keys.
     
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2017

  19. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Telefied Ad Free Member

    Some not so well, but some absolutely very well intonated.

    We had a member here from Maryland, Mellecaster, and he could get the straight ones to intonate when some others just couldn't.

    In addition to that, some individual players know how to finesse certain notes to sweeten up the sound, and they move certain passages around on the fretboard to get the best intonation, and they move to larger gauge strings since they seem to intonate better, and if something "doesn't sound right" they replace it with something that does sound right.

    Although I avoid E-tuners, otherwise I really agree with what Dacious is saying. There's choices you have made or could make that create a guitar that wants to intonate the way Leo designed it. Big strings, small frets, and just a more "vintage" way in terms of the setup, and a lot of the issues cure up. But this is why I like saddles with just a touch of slant - I confused as to why anyone needs massive amounts of compensation.
     
    LowCaster likes this.

  20. LowCaster

    LowCaster Tele-Meister

    Age:
    45
    435
    Jan 24, 2011
    Paris, France
    Yes! The last time I did a precise intonation setup, I discovered that when the intonation is spot on at the 12th fret, if you move two steps up or down the neck then it is slightly sharp or flat. You won't believe it if you don't see it yourself. All this is a matter of compromises. Also, I play a vintage melody maker, with the plain uncompensated wraparound bridge, for wich you need to make a compromise for intonation between each and every string. At the end of the day it plays fine.

    So I really don't get the "you need compensated saddles or you are not well intonated" thing. I tend to think it is wrong to say that. However, if I was to build a guitar I would probably order those compensated saddles as well, because it is right to seek for the best, even if it is not completely necessary, but...

    We have a saying in french "Le mieux est l'ennemi du bien." --- I don't know how it translates in english: "The best is the ennemy of what is good" ? ;)
     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2017
    boris bubbanov likes this.

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