Question for the young guys/gals...

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by chet again, May 15, 2019.

  1. Asmith

    Asmith Friend of Leo's

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    Thanks for summing up my priorities and musical interests. In my world theres no discussion when it comes to buying nikes, always Sambas. :lol:

    I think you are making a valid point about the trends of today but people have always been trying to fit in. I'm not saying I like my generation but I think its the changes in the music industry rather than the audience that are to blame for the fast turn over on music these days.
     
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  2. Tonetele

    Tonetele Poster Extraordinaire

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    I'm glad I am old enough to say I heard Roy Orbison when he wrote "OH! Pretty Woman" through to the Beatles, Rolling Stones,( met Brian Wilson), saw Led Zepplin, The Police, The Guess Who, Bryan Adams,America,Jim Croce, Neil Young, Dire Straits and all of that era.
    .I'm not sure what young people like as I can't stand modern stuff, lights and the drugs that go with that music. So sad. As I said, I lived through, what I call , the "good stuff" and worked so hard to play like Steve Howe, Mark Knopfler, Clapton, Lynyrd Skynyrd et.al.
    Tommy Emmanuel says, and I've seen him, teaching incredible young finger pickers, but they arei n a minority. He is adored in Singapore yet other SE- Asian countries thrive on rap, drugs and alcohol , to our younster's detriment (JMHO). Certainly to the detriment of their health.
     
  3. Tonetele

    Tonetele Poster Extraordinaire

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    P.S Thank goodness for Taylor Goldsmith and Dawes and what is coming out of Orange County LA.
     
  4. Whatizitman

    Whatizitman Tele-Afflicted

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    You could almost say that was The Day The Music Died. :twisted:


    I grew up in the 70s and 80s. My parents were teens in the 50s. Interestingly, neither of them listened to popular 50s music. My dad liked Chet Atkins and talk radio. My mom liked whatever was current pop on the radio. She had Born In the USA on tape, and almost wore it out. I kinda had to seek out my own musical tastes from very early on. Fortunately, I had good AOR stations, early MTV, and college radio to help me out.
     
  5. -Hawk-

    -Hawk- Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I’ll be 40 this year, so I missed out on music-making during all those decades aside from the late 80’s.

    I dunno. I’m a sucker for melody and I’ve always just liked good songs, regardless of when they were written.
     
  6. Cysquatch

    Cysquatch Tele-Meister

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    I'll be 25 this summer, so I'm sure I'm one of the younglings around these parts. I'd have to agree with what a few guys have said about taste being formed largely by what you grew up hearing. My dad was a big jazz, early prog, and classic rock guy - more blues-rock and southern rock than anything, mom was all about harder stuff like early Judas Priest, Maiden, that whole world. And my grandpa lived with us and he poured all kinds of 50s rock and roll into my brain with a nice helping of classic twangers like Hag and Hank Sr. My tastes have been pretty clearly influenced by all of that, but I was lucky enough that my dad always encouraged me to listen to anything and everything and not be worried about if it was something other people I knew liked or was popular. I think I was just very lucky circumstantially.

    To actually answer the question, no. I think of classic rock or oldies stations as "my music" and top 40s stations as something I'm too old for. :rolleyes: But really, I like just about every genre in some form or another, some you just have to pick through a little more judiciously to find worthwhile stuff.
     
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  7. nojazzhere

    nojazzhere Poster Extraordinaire

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    I don't know if I could say "MOST" music.....but maybe "a lot of" music......sadly, too much of it has NO redeeming qualities AT ALL.
     
  8. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

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    42 and In the early 80's my mom listen too a lot of Motown and R&B of the same time. Both parents encouraged me to listen to what ever I wanted. Rock n' Roll has died and came back a few times. A good song often transcends the genre, yes even rap songs, that's how I've always listened to music.
     
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  9. Pualee

    Pualee Tele-Meister

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    When I grew up (80s), it was a treat to listen to oldies (60's) music. Normally, it was talk radio or news.

    When I was old enough to control the radio, I developed a strong interest in 50's music - which my parents found surprising and laughed saying "that was my parents music".

    Naturally, as the 90's came, I developed a love for grunge and the Seattle type sound. I still identify with that "sound" more than any other - though my musical preferences have changed. When I hear it, it stops me and I want to listen.
     
  10. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    I was born in 1979, so I missed most of the decades you mentioned, in terms of 'being there'. I first listened to and enjoyed 80s music, which I love.

    Because I grew up in a musical family, and my dad owned nearly 1000 records, I had access to a decent sample of the first century of recorded music and sound, including classical, showtunes, and Latino music. I can relate to all of it based on that collection alone, I'm not limited to stuff that was coming out in my formative years. I'm a music lover/appreciator and every record is worth at least one listen.

    I'm not locked into a mentality that old music is best, or the stuff I listened to before the internet and smartphones was more legit. My parents music, that's relative to their experience. I can play them something from today and they'll want to hear more --"who's this?" my dad will ask. Then he'll start listening to their music on youtube. He can still put one on me, and I'll be asking him the same. We relate over the good tunes regardless of our generation gap.

    New music is worth paying attention to. Sure, I'm not very young or very old, but I don't plan on being an old fart that can't give something new a shot, even if it's derivative. If guitar music starts to get boring, I can pull on so much electronic music and hip hop as I please :)
     
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  11. jimilee

    jimilee Tele-Holic Silver Supporter

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    They don’t call it the day the music died for nothing.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  12. SolidSteak

    SolidSteak Friend of Leo's

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    It's definitely a different world for being a music "consumer" than it was pre-1990 or even pre-2005. IMO it's not useful to compare album sales from the 1960s with the youtube views of today.

    I like to think it's not really "my music" or "your music." That just reflects how kids use music to shape their identities during their formative years (which includes any music - not just music of the time). Then when you get older maybe you still feel like "this is MY music" but that's just being nostalgic.

    I think by age 40 it requires more of an active effort to seek out new music to listen to that's not just a copy of what we listened to socially at 16.
     
  13. beninma

    beninma Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

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    I was born in 1977. My parents aren't musical really at all. They listened to a lot of 70s singer-songwriter stuff. Simon & Garfunkel, Neil Young, etc.. my dad got really into listening to classical music too, he went nuts on that stuff in the 1990s.

    My first introduction to big kids music was some horrible hair band stuff in the mid-late 80s. Pretty sure I got Bon Jovi's slippery when wet on Cassette for around my 10th or 11th birthday when I got a "boom box" for my birthday. My mother would have picked that out, guess she did OK for the time as that album was a massive pop hit.

    I listened to the radio a lot. I actually remember listening to quite a lot of SRV on Boston radio in the late 80s but not knowing who he was at the time. I was pretty into Motley Crue, Metallica, etc.. type stuff then.

    Amazingly I never really cared for Nirvana or that much of the grunge stuff. That stuff got blasted into my ears forever on the radio.. Sound Garden, Alice in Chains, etc..

    When I went to college the stuff I spent the most time listening to would have included the following. I didn't have much budget for CDs and the radio stations weren't great. So this just happened to include stuff I had bought and played a lot. Stuff I really remember.

    - Pink Floyd
    - Led Zeppelin
    - Tool
    - U2 (That 2 disc set of best of 1980-1990 & B-sides)

    We started pirating MP3s in 1996 IIRC in college, very early.. but I didn't have money for a computer big enough to have a lot of downloaded music till far far later. I didn't "rip" my CD collection till 2003, by which point I was out of school and had bought a few hundred new CDs.

    In the early 2000s I listened to a lot of electronic stuff... lots of Moby's music, also lots of NiN. But Electronic music started getting stale REALLY fast. Easy to forget it is just disco with computer sounds!

    I really like lots of 60s & 70s music. Definitely less into 50s. I have a real hard time listening to Elvis and a lot of other 50s stuff that basically sounds like modern Boy Band pop to me.
     
  14. Grant Austin

    Grant Austin Tele-Meister

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    People said the exact same things about pop music all the way back to Mozart and beyond.
     
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  15. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    I can't say that I agree with that perspective. I can find something I like in really every type of music I've encountered. I'm like Will Rogers that way, I guess
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2019
  16. Mike Eskimo

    Mike Eskimo Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Music has been going down hill since Elvis was considered the beginning of rock n roll.
    It’s funny - anything before rock n roll is considered “roots” - meaning it’s value is in how it helped create rock n roll - not that it by itself is any good.


    Great stuff , great artists though highly derivative. They are not inventing the wheel. Not even reinventing the wheel.*


    I’m 55 and I still want to be musically challenged !

    Challenge me !

    C’mon musicians/artists - I don’t want your pot pie/comfort food music ! Make me scratch my head occasionally !

    * I do love that band and Taylor, I’m just being picky...
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2019
  17. Chunkocaster

    Chunkocaster Poster Extraordinaire

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    They didn't have writers writing new songs for them every week mostly to sell consumer goods off their backs and most of their songs are still remembered. Not likely with the viral stuff coming out on YouTube every week. The music videos promoted the most on YouTube are more like commercials than ground breaking new songs. They were also more entertaining to watch because they played actual instruments.
    Once they cant fit in their hot pants any longer and long before their facial tattoos are a blur they will be dropped like a hot potato.
     
    Last edited: May 15, 2019
  18. Toto'sDad

    Toto'sDad Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Bah Humbug, all a REAL musician needs is this:

    [​IMG]
     
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  19. beagle

    beagle Friend of Leo's

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    Anybody that considers Elvis to be the beginning of rock 'n' roll should be...*coughs*
     
  20. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    Elvis said he just took what people like Fats Domino had been doing in New Orleans for years, and ran with it. He actually name-checked Fats specifically. And Elvis said Jackie Wilson is who they should call the King of Rock n Roll.

    People that hate on Elvis make lots of assumptions about the guy that just aren't true.

    He was a humble and very polite young man, who shot his television regularly :cool:
     
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