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Punk Rock: how much of it really was truly "Punk rock?"

Discussion in 'Music to Your Ears' started by Blazer, Oct 22, 2015.

  1. dlew919

    dlew919 Poster Extraordinaire

    Aug 6, 2012
    Sydney

    The pistols showed us exactly how worthwhile mclaren was which was not very. Never mind the bollocks is a great album, don't get me wrong, but the way he handles them was just disgraceful.
     

  2. Drubbing

    Drubbing Friend of Leo's

    Almost criminally underrated, but as big as the Pistols (til they imploded), and the the Clash at least in the UK.

    After their early punk rooted sounds they'd become template setters for Goth rock, just like Souxsie and the Banshees - dipping in and out of punk.

     

  3. ozcal

    ozcal Tele-Meister

    439
    Feb 5, 2015
    ca
    i love atdi... incredible band... would have loved to have seen them live...
     

  4. Cat MacKinnon

    Cat MacKinnon Friend of Leo's

    Nov 13, 2011
    Colorado
    I'm no stranger to the MCA years ;):
    [​IMG]


    I found this in the mid-90's and I've had it ever since. Currently in my dining area:
    [​IMG]

    I used to have a Phantasmagoria t-shirt too, it had the album cover artwork on it and was one of the nicest t-shirt prints I've ever seen. I loved it and wore it all throughout high school. I'd buy another one in a heartbeat if I ever came across it!

    Sadly, Bryn Merrick passed away just two months ago. He'd been battling cancer (ironically at the same cancer hospital that another former Damned bassist, Paul Gray, was being treated in!) They both did a few speaking engagements several months back for the release of the Damned doc "Don't You Wish That We Were Dead". The doc looks great, but it's not available for streaming anywhere yet (they did show it at the Alamo in Denver, but I missed it.) I'm hoping they'll release it for streaming or purchase after New Years or something.
     

  5. Cat MacKinnon

    Cat MacKinnon Friend of Leo's

    Nov 13, 2011
    Colorado
    I think even Lydon has said that the Pistols were basically a "put-together" band like most boy bands. They kind of already knew each other, but McLaren was the Svengali that drove the whole thing. I remember Lydon saying that he even liked Pink Floyd, but Malcolm was the one who wrote "I Hate..." on that shirt.

    I certainly wouldn't call the Pistols frauds, but they weren't really in charge of the whole package either; it really was kind of a weird thing with them. I think the reason I always liked PiL way more is because it's what John really wanted to do, without having some skeevy manager dictating it all.

    BTW, since we were on the subject, here's the trailer for the new Damned documentary. It came out several months back, but so far it's only had a short run in a handful of indie theatres. I'm hoping that'll change sooner rather than later, because it looks great! Also, there are a couple hour-long videos on YT of the director doing some Q&As at showings: one features Captain Sensible, the other has Bryn Merrick and Paul Gray, both are highly recommended!

     

  6. Blazer

    Blazer Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    41
    Dec 2, 2003
    The Netherlands
    The recording of the Bad Brains' first album was a definite Punk Rock affair...

     

  7. fendertx

    fendertx Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Nov 12, 2008
    Houston

  8. cyclopean

    cyclopean Tele-Afflicted

    Aug 14, 2009
    innsmouth, MA
    If we're talking documentaries, I can't vouch enough for the X documentary. I went from liking that band to loving that band.
     

  9. David Barnett

    David Barnett Poster Extraordinaire

    Punk rock theme park:

    http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/cbgb-to-reopen-as-restaurant-in-newark-airport-20151221

     

  10. Rick330man

    Rick330man Tele-Meister

    374
    Jan 9, 2011
    Florida Keys
    Musically talentless shock jocks and bad hygiene are poor excuses for music. There's nothing punk about those. Calling it punk is just commercial, big money spin doctoring - the same stunt big shot moneyed politicians do.

    It is all about the music, and those who credited Link Wray hit the nail on the head. In this genre, it all starts with him. The Kinks "You Really Got Me" in 1964 is defined by many as the start of punk rock. It added lyrics, to the raw sound started by Link Wray. You might say it carried the torch to the next level.

    The lyrical roots were laid by Pete Townsend in 1965 with "My Generation." Townsend gave Rolling Stone an interview in the mid 70's where he made it a point to give Link Wray the inspirational credit popular culture had denied him, but you clearly see the roots to the punk rock family tree taking hold .

    Not surprisingly, a decade after the Kinks and the Who hit the scene came the Jam and the Clash: different bands but both great in their own ways. They were pretty open about who their influences were: largely the Who, the Kinks and the Small Faces.

    There was a record producer who had gone to check out the Ramones and described them as "bubble gum with distortion." Can't remember his name, but he got that right. The first time I played a Ramones' album in 1977 me and a roomful of my friends couldn't stop laughing at the absurd lyrics.

    Last thought: honorable mention to the Buzzcocks. Loved them. Still do. I never thought in the late 70's that I'd hear their tunes in kids' (Shrek) movies and soft drink (Mountain Dew) commercials?
     

  11. TheVel

    TheVel Tele-Meister

    180
    Apr 9, 2015
    Missouri
    +1 for the Link Wray mentions...he seems to get overlooked a lot.
     

  12. Brad Pittiful

    Brad Pittiful Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Dec 22, 2008
    Philly Burbs
    i wonder why he is overlooked...since he was such a force in the punk world :lol:
     

  13. Blazer

    Blazer Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    41
    Dec 2, 2003
    The Netherlands
    The presenter of the UK Music show The Old Grey Whistle test said about the New York Dolls that they were "Mock rock" and "They are to the Rolling Stones what the Monkees were to the Beatles."

    Hindsight is always 20/20 and not many agreed with him.
     

  14. Blazer

    Blazer Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    41
    Dec 2, 2003
    The Netherlands
    The funny thing is that Punk Rock and Reggae found a common ground, in the fact that the whole singing it like you lived it mentality was there.

    A very good example of a reggae song that lyric wise could have well been a punk song was "One in ten" by UB40 who named themselves after an Unemployment Benefit form. Seeing as how so many of the punks and rastas were unemployed, they quickly found their audience.


    But an even more unlikely common ground Punk shared was with Abba. Steve Jones admitted that the riff to Pretty Vacant was him trying to ape "SOS"
    The Clash' "Spanish bombs" aped the sound of Abba even more but it was Elvis Costello who on "Oliver's army" took it to another level, complete with Benny Anderson style piano playing.

    So why did punk rock embrace Abba, rather than to reject them?

    Because Abba were singing it like they lived it but rather than songs about being unemployed, rioting, being angry with the local government Abba sang songs about relationships souring, divorce, the pain of separation, seeing as how painful it must be for the children. And none of it was staged, John Lydon once remarked that seeing Agnetha in the video for "the winner takes it all" was the most genuine grief stricken face he ever saw. This wasn't staged, none of it was and the punks respected that.
    [​IMG]
     

  15. dlew919

    dlew919 Poster Extraordinaire

    Aug 6, 2012
    Sydney
    Agreed on abba.

    The other punk band I think is queen. Now the punks hated them but think about it

    They didn't give a F*** about what people thought.

    They broke the rules.

    They had politically outside thoughts (Freddie loved the monarchy)

    Now while on one level this is anti punk on another level you don't get more punk.

    The who and the stones too.
     

  16. TheVel

    TheVel Tele-Meister

    180
    Apr 9, 2015
    Missouri

    Not saying that...just the influence in the major use of power chords way before it was being done in punk.Or anything else at the time.
     

  17. cyclopean

    cyclopean Tele-Afflicted

    Aug 14, 2009
    innsmouth, MA


    Tau cross is one of my favorite new punk bands - the bassist/singer from Amebix, two guys from misery, and the drummer from voivod. There's a lot of killing joke in this.
     

  18. cyclopean

    cyclopean Tele-Afflicted

    Aug 14, 2009
    innsmouth, MA
    I just saw the cbgbs movie. The casting is impressive for how much the actors look like the real life people they're imitating. The movie is ok. It's disappointing that it stops before nyhc starts. Watching the bad brains and the cro-mags and agnostic front would have been more interesting.
     

  19. Brad Pittiful

    Brad Pittiful Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Dec 22, 2008
    Philly Burbs

    i was joking around man!
     

  20. Rick330man

    Rick330man Tele-Meister

    374
    Jan 9, 2011
    Florida Keys
    I never cared for the New York Dolls. They were just attention getters who belched out substandard music on their best day.

    Of course, they gave us Buster Poindexter (David Johansen) and "Hot, Hot, Hot." That tells you all you need to know about why they are out of their league in a discussion that includes Link Wray & the Wraymen, the Who, the Kinks, the Clash, the Jam , the Buzzcocks, the Dead Kennedys and even the Ramones. .
     

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