Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Precision guitar kit 59 Jr. kit TV yellow thread

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Flakey, May 13, 2013.

  1. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's

    I bought a 59 L.P. jr. kit from Precision Guitar kits and some T.V yellow in rattle can from Reranch. Both should be here tomorrow. Anyone one interested in a build/finish thread? If so I'll start taking pixs while I build.
     

  2. Fred.T

    Fred.T Tele-Meister

    325
    Sep 29, 2009
    Zagreb, Croatia
    Yes! Looking at the same kit myself...
    Please share some experience and pics!
     

  3. gpselmer

    gpselmer TDPRI Member

    Age:
    41
    8
    Oct 9, 2009
    Paris
    Please make it a finishing thread :)
    Would like to get my hands on such a a kit
    Cheers
     

  4. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's

    Ok build and finish thread it is.

    The Goodies showed up at the Apartment today from Canada. Really quick delivery about 5 business days. Everything was packaged nicely and secure. I bought tuning machines with my order. Precision sells all the parts you need to put your guitar together or you can source your own.
     

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    Last edited: May 13, 2013

  5. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's

    Here is the body and neck. They are african mahogany which I'm told isn't really a species of mahogany but the grain looks the same and sonically is also the same. Looks fine to me. They do sell this in Honduran mahogany for an up charge of $55.00 U.S. Their website explains their product line well.

    I ordered the neck with their head stock design. Its kind of a combination of the Gibson "open book" top and the side edges cut in like the Epiphone Casino.

    They do sell it with a paddle head stock if you want to cut your own design. I don't trust my scroll saw skills yet so I went with their profile.
     

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    Last edited: May 13, 2013

  6. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's

    The next step it to dry fit the neck and body joint for proper fit...AND IT DOES FIT VERY TIGHT!!!! :eek:Which is what we want. No gaps at the heal or sides.

    The reason they can get these results is because they machine the neck to the body. Notice the matching numbers on the neck and body.

    I ran out of time today but tomorrow I'm glueing up the neck and body. If anyone wants measurements of this area let me know and i'll post them before the glue up.
     

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    Last edited: May 13, 2013

  7. Cat MacKinnon

    Cat MacKinnon Friend of Leo's

    Nov 13, 2011
    Colorado
    that kit looks really nice! i've been looking at the Precision kits for a couple years now, and one of these days i really want to put one together.

    fwiw, "African Mahogany" (aka Khaya) is what most guitar manufacturers use these days. a lot of the South American/tropical "true" mahoganies are either much more expensive or difficult (or impossible) to get these days. here's what Wikipedia says: "The timber of Khaya is called African mahogany, the only timber widely accepted as mahogany besides that of the true mahogany, of the genus Swietenia."

    so even though it's not technically mahogany, it's still mahogany ;).
     

  8. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's

    Cool! Thanks for the info!
     

  9. halfmassive

    halfmassive Tele-Meister

    191
    Jul 7, 2004
    chicago, IL
    I'm about to wrap up the exact same build but in a sunburst. Ill post some pics in a different thread once its all done. The set neck build was new to me but was a welcome change from bolt ons. Enjoy!
     

  10. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's

    Ok, knowing that if I was going with the traditional black headstock with this project I would be dealing with two different colors on the guitar and frankly I find it a PITA.; (making sure one color is cured before taping it up to shoot the other color, hoping the tape doesn't pull the earlier color off, rebuilding the color if it does, etc.) so I decide to veneer the head stock with a thin sheet of burl walnut I had laying around from a previous furniture restoration project. I want the head stock to mimic the pick guard.

    I put document clips on the side of the veneer so I'm not directly touching the walnut so much and risk cracking it.

    I'll be putting several light coats of shellac to impart an amber color similar to the pick guard plus I think it warms the walnut natural color up nicely.
     

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  11. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's

    Now normally I would mix up a batch of hide glue when working with walnut veneer. The reason is is that some of these thin sheets of burl can become brittle when being handled and crack. The hide glue allows me to not only apply the glue to the contact surfaces but also apply to the top of the veneer to keep it intact. It dries clear and is transparent under lacquer. Since I'm working with a relatively small piece I'm not willing do to the extra work so I'll use a different method that is pretty slick. I'll apply wood glue to both contact surfaces; the head stock and one side of the veneer and press down with a hot iron.

    First:

    Get your wood glue and apply it to the head stock and veneer and spread it across the surface of of both pieces. Like your icing a cake. All areas must be covered to avoid it lifting and air bubbles forming underneath and getting trapped between the headstock and veneer. I did cover the head stock completely but the glue was almost dried by the time I took the picture. As you can see, the glue does dry somewhat clear.
     

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  12. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's

    Ok, after both glued pieces are dried take the veneer and line it up with the head stock so that its completely cover glued side to glued side. When you are satisfied with its placement take a hot iron and press the veneer down on the head stock (you can use a regular clothes iron if you want and the wife won't see you;)). If you do do this make sure the steam setting is off or you will ruin the glue and veneer :lol:.

    I start in the middle and work my way out to the edges making sure I really get those edges tacked down good. They are more likely to separate on the edges than the center of the head stock.

    Noticed I used a square sheet of veneer over the head stock and didn't cut the veneer to the head stock shape before I applied it. I did this to ensure good adhesion and coverage because the heating then cooling can sometimes cause the veneer to shrink slightly. I'll trim it to fit and sand the veneer edges back flush to the head stock once I know the veneer has cooled, the glue set and the piece will stay in place.
     

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  13. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's

    Ok the piece is tacked on and keep working the piece while checking for any separation and a wet appearance begins to show that the reactivated glue is moving further in the pores of the wood. But I notice the veneer is starting to crack away from the edges. TIME TO STOP!!!

    I don't want that to happen! :eek:

    The reason is with the grain of the burl also runs is swirls and I don't want any cracking into the headstock area that may cause the it to flake off when I cut away the excess off.

    So time to let it sit to cool down. Then I started to trim away the excess cutting it off in section; one cut perpendicular to the head stock then a parallel cut taking it off in sections.
     

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    Last edited: May 16, 2013

  14. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's

    The veneer is thin enough I can trim away most of it with a really good and sharp scissors cutting away little by little in sections. ( it really doesn't take but 5 minutes to to this).

    Once I get so close to the head stock that I can't get in close with a scissors I'll need to cut away the rest with a razor blade or knife. When you cut walnut that is this thin you always risk possible tearaway so I apply a wash coat of shellac to the walnut and let it dry. This helps in making the veneer a little more rigid but its still easy to cut through.

    I'm feeling lazy so I don't want to mix my own shellac and its a small piece so I get a can of a 3lbs cut from the hardware store and mix a spit coat of a ratio of 1 to 4 of shellac to denatured alcohol.

    I'll let it sit overnight to let the wax settle out on the bottom of the jar then pour the dewaxed shellac into a new jar and brush it on the head stock.
     

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    Last edited: May 16, 2013

  15. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's

    After cutting away the excess veneer its time to sand the sides flush with the head stock. I get a piece of 400 grit sand paper, apply another wash coat of shellac ( a coat this thin and watery will dry in about 5 minutes) and sand until its even and I have a nice clean line. I'll check the sides to make sure there is no separation and apply a straight coat of shellac to build up the color.
     

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  16. Glen Smith

    Glen Smith RIP

    Aug 20, 2011
    Canada
    That looks much better than it did in your 6:57 post.
     

  17. Cat MacKinnon

    Cat MacKinnon Friend of Leo's

    Nov 13, 2011
    Colorado
    could you use veneer softener, or would that be too much hassle for such a small piece? anyway, i love the burl veneer and i think it looks great with that pg!
     

  18. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's


    Ugly ducklings turning into swans...yeah when you start these processes it can look scary but its about the outcome:lol:;)
     

  19. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's

    Thanks! I've used it with hide glue when I'm using large projects or multiple pieces but since the wood glue cleans up with water I was reluctant to apply any fluids to the piece prior to the glue curing up once mounted.

    I applied more coats of shellac and it really coming out nice.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2013

  20. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's

    Ok its time to glue the neck to the body. AS always we make sure its going to fit by dry fitting the parts first which i did when I receive the parts. They do a great job making it fit just right.

    When gluing up make sure you have a damp rag near by to wipe up any drips on the wood and you'll need it to wipe up any squeeze out. Its easier to get the excess glue when its wet than sanding and scrapping when its dry!

    So I apply about a quarter size drop of glue and spread it to the bottom and sides of the neck cavity using my finger. This amount will be more than enough.
     

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