Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Pony Express build thread for OCD's 1st T-classic

Discussion in 'Tele Home Depot' started by PonyExpress, Oct 6, 2017.

  1. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

    Mar 27, 2012
    Calgary, Alberta
    Nice job. What I like to do when I'm finished shaping is run thin CA over the skunk stripe so it won't pop when adjusting the truss rod. It soaks in and holds it. Ask me how I know... When I first started using double action truss rods I didn't rout the channel deep enough so the stripe wasn't in deep enough and would get thin around the first frets after the contour was done. Pop goes the weasel.. The CA sands down nicely and wicks into the stripe and strengthens it a bit.
     
    oldfish likes this.

  2. PonyExpress

    PonyExpress Tele-Meister

    Age:
    56
    109
    Sep 28, 2017
    Texas
    rickyricardo, I used titebond 2 which is supposed to be stronger than the wood itself, and I used plenty. Do you think i still need to do the super glue? will it get in there where the titebond already is? I ask because I don't know for sure.
     

  3. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

    Mar 27, 2012
    Calgary, Alberta
    I use Titebond original which is everyone's choice around here so I went with it. II and III are for exterior use but is probably okay. I've never used it.

    What kind of truss rod did you use and how deep is the channel? I still put on CA anyway because it doesn't hurt. It'll wick into the tiniest of gaps between the maple and the stripe.
     

  4. PonyExpress

    PonyExpress Tele-Meister

    Age:
    56
    109
    Sep 28, 2017
    Texas
    i used the low profile double action from SM. Im not opposed to using the CA glue just wondering if it would go where there is already glue.
     

  5. PonyExpress

    PonyExpress Tele-Meister

    Age:
    56
    109
    Sep 28, 2017
    Texas
    Two problems I need help / advice.

    here is the tuner holes. zoom in and see the pencil line. They are off line a bit. Should I just go with it or plug and re drill? 20171103_102733[1].jpg

    I was filing the bottom of the nut slot with a regular file and now the slot is a little wide. I have ordered a wider nut blank but it there another option/fix?
    20171103_102825[1].jpg


    So an update as to where i'm at.

    currently painting the body black. I'm using rustoleum black lacquer and wet sanding back with 320 grit wet/dry. this lacquer is hard to get a wet coat. But I'm thinking that it doesn't matter because once its flat sanded its going on to clear over a sanded color coat right? To what grit should I flat sand to before starting with clear? and is deft clear lacquer a good clear?

    neck is all done shaping wise. waiting on hammer to arrive. Fret markers are in on fret board, including the special one at the 12th (more on that later) headstock has been thicknessed to 1/2" but need to do the radius up to nut. Don't have a drum sander. Still thinking on how i'm going to do that. Open to suggestions
     

  6. DrASATele

    DrASATele Poster Extraordinaire

    Jul 6, 2012
    North of Boston
    Don't sweat the tuner alignment, that's actually pretty good, you shouldn't have any issues with using them.

    I'm grasping at straws for your last question, do you mean you do not have a radius sanding block for the fret board? or are you asking for suggestions on the round over on the headstock?

    for the fret board, I radius the whole thing after cutting slots and nut slot, then I re-slot the frets so the slot matches the radius depth wise. After the frets are on I use a pencil, cut in 1/2 the long way, to ride across the frets to mark the nut (check Ron Kirn's website for detailed pics in his strat build) I do not use a drum/belt sander at all

    the round over, I like to use cabinet scrapers or riflers rasps to get this and then hand bend in areas I can't use those tools on.

    I'm probably way off and didn't cover it but I tried!
     

  7. Engraver-60

    Engraver-60 Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    65
    Jan 6, 2008
    Franklin, TN
    For the too thin nut blank - got to a local pet store and buy a bleached bone. You can make blanks for 50 cents each all day long until you get what you need. You will get it right first time after you smell it!! Cut it thick and flat sand until it's right.
     
    DrASATele likes this.

  8. PonyExpress

    PonyExpress Tele-Meister

    Age:
    56
    109
    Sep 28, 2017
    Texas
    DRasatele, i was referring to the transition from the headstock face up to the nut.
     

  9. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

    Mar 27, 2012
    Calgary, Alberta
    It's always been done with a spindle sander as far as I know. You could buy a template sander/spindle and rig up something with a hand drill but you would need to have the drill in a jig or a vise so you don't dig into the headstock. I have this one:
    http://www.leevalley.com/en/Wood/page.aspx?p=59448&cat=1,42500

    I know Gil Yaron (preeb) has shown that in some of his earlier threads.. I use my ROSS with the largest spindle.

    I can't answer your lacquer question but I would find out if Rustoleum ad Deft play together - are they compatible lacquers. If you're using rattle cans then put them in warm (not hot) water for a while before spraying and it should come out better. That's about all I know about rattle cans as I don't use them for finishing.
     

  10. PonyExpress

    PonyExpress Tele-Meister

    Age:
    56
    109
    Sep 28, 2017
    Texas
    RickyRicard, thanks for the tip on warming the lacquer . Ill give that a try.

    So I went to harbor freighjt and bought the spindle sanders that you put in a drill press, jiged up and clamped the neck plumb and square and went at it.
    20171103_151645[1].jpg

    20171103_151653[1].jpg

    20171103_152336[1].jpg

    Im pretty happy with that.
    20171103_152416[1].jpg

    here's a shot of the body paint in progress. That's wet sanded to 320 grit and about to get another (hopefully last) coat. Thinking wet sanded to 400 grit should be enough before top coating with clear. Bought a can of rustoleum clear lacquer gloss. Maybe just use that instead of worrying about compatibility with the deft.
     
    fenderchamp likes this.

  11. Bagman67

    Bagman67 Tele-Meister

    155
    Oct 20, 2011
    San Jose, CA
    This is an inspiring project.

    The thing about lacquer is that each coat melts into the last. There's no need to go to wet-sanded at 400 grit. You actually want a little tooth for the subsequent coats. Go too smooth and you risk the possibility of your substrate rejecting the next coat you spray on. Again, because lacquer is a hot finish, i.e., melts the layer below it, it's not as likely as with a poly or other finish, but still - you're working too hard for no real advantage. Give it a quick dry scuff sand with 320, max, blow it off or wipe with naphtha if you don't have a compressor, and get to spraying the next coat. You'll build your coats faster without all that sanding and, since they melt together, you will have a thicker layer of clear coat to keep you from burning through to color when it's time for wet-sanding for real.

    And you're way past it now, but with a tele or strat, as long as there's no tremolo spring cavity to run into, it's okay to rout pickup cavities a little deeper to smooth the bottom out where your Forstner bit point left marks.
     

  12. kingoflimbs

    kingoflimbs Tele-Meister

    426
    Sep 8, 2011
    New Jersey
    this is true of nitrocellulose lacquer. acrylic lacquer will not.
     

  13. TRexF16

    TRexF16 Friend of Leo's

    Apr 4, 2011
    Tucson
    My experience has been counter to this. But it is possible I could be wrong.
    Kingoflimbs, do you know for certain, from your own experience, that there is something about the solvent base and composition of acrylic lacquer that makes it NOT melt into the previous coats? Both nitro and acrylic use the same basic solvents, right?

    Do others agree that acrylic (like, for instance, our much used Duplicolor rattlecans) won't melt into itself? I also have had no problems with nitro topcoats melting into acrylic lacquer color coats.

    Thanks,
    Rex
     

  14. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

    Mar 27, 2012
    Calgary, Alberta
    I use water base lacquer which is acrylic and it burns in perfectly. If I have a run from the previous coat I hit that area a little more and hold the piece so it's flat and the run is usually gone depending on where it is. The specs for what I use advertises 100% burn in. I started with Target Coatings EM6000 and now use my suppliers own formula and they both do the same thing in that respect.
     
    fenderchamp likes this.

  15. PonyExpress

    PonyExpress Tele-Meister

    Age:
    56
    109
    Sep 28, 2017
    Texas
    I just dont understand how you can have water based and lacquer in the same sentance
     

  16. RickyRicardo

    RickyRicardo Friend of Leo's

    Mar 27, 2012
    Calgary, Alberta
    :).. Yea I know what you mean. It works though. Lots of furniture guys use it.
     

  17. PonyExpress

    PonyExpress Tele-Meister

    Age:
    56
    109
    Sep 28, 2017
    Texas
    So I've been busy, internet service was out of order for 5 days, and I'm having to wait to finish the body polish because its still soft.

    But I have gotten a few things accomplished

    I made a template to locate the holes for the tuner pins
    20171112_173247.jpg

    It did an excellent job, but the big holes in the head stock just weren't in a line

    20171112_172433.jpg

    20171112_172946.jpg

    20171112_173000.jpg

    Its just going to have to do. is what it is

    got the marker dots on front and edge done

    20171112_173031.jpg
    20171112_172446.jpg

    so now for some questions and hellp

    If I decide to Tru oil the neck, what grit should I sand to before starting the oil coats?

    what do you guys lay you body on when wet sanding and polishing to not scratch it?

    and what do you use to wipe off the polish and such . The micro fiber clothes I have seem to make marks.

    Also, 2 of the tuners are longer than the other 4. I assume that the long ones are for the top to strings, correct?
     

  18. TRexF16

    TRexF16 Friend of Leo's

    Apr 4, 2011
    Tucson
    Those tuners are plenty close enough for gov'ment work. As my wife's granny used to say, "it'll never be seen from a galloping horse." Heck, can't even really see an issue in close-up pictures.

    Like the Tejas inlay.

    You might consider another nice even spray coat of the color with no sanding afterward before you get into your topcoats. Remind us what the color is and what you plan for the topcoat?

    You're doing great on this and I think you'll have yourself a fine guitar in the end.

    Cheers,
    Rex
     

  19. esetter

    esetter Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

    Sep 1, 2011
    MI
    The neck looks great! Love that inlay. The tuners are definitely close enough for government work!
     

  20. PonyExpress

    PonyExpress Tele-Meister

    Age:
    56
    109
    Sep 28, 2017
    Texas
    The body paint is black rustoleum Lacquer with Rustoleum clear lacquer. I am in the final polishing phase but its soft and the soft towel I lay it on makes impressions. What do you guys use to lay the work on to protect it?

    I want to get on with finishing the neck but not sure what I'm gonna do.

    I want to have a decal on the head stock so guess i will need a clear lacquer or poly there. Thinking about tru oil on neck except the head stock, then put in frets after tru oil. No cleaning off frets.

    Definitely going to need lots of input from you guys before moving forward with neck finish
     

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