Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Pine bodies - why did they not continue them?

Discussion in 'Telecaster Discussion Forum' started by Geoff738, Jun 15, 2007.

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  1. SixShooter

    SixShooter Friend of Leo's

    Sep 20, 2008
    Cincinnati
    If you put a thin maple top and back over the pine in order to add protection, would it alter the tone of the guitar?
     

  2. falconer

    falconer Tele-Holic

    800
    Feb 5, 2009
    Oceanside
    [​IMG]
     

  3. strat_tone

    strat_tone Banned

    Age:
    27
    323
    Apr 1, 2010
    USA
    Yes. The real question is would you be able to tell plugged in. IE will it alter the vibrations picked up by the pickups?
     

  4. boris bubbanov

    boris bubbanov Telefied Ad Free Member

    +1

    I'm afraid the pine "look" is probably 85% of the appeal.

    Lots of guitars get dropped on their ends or edges. I don't think a thin cap would be enough to prevent pretty much the same sort of damage; in fact the damage would be "clumsy" and couldn't be left alone as easily.

    This is just going around in circles. The REAL reason certain pine bodied guitars have been so well received here was, they were made by some highly skilled people who cherry picked (no pun intended) the best examples of certain types of wood.
     

  5. falconer

    falconer Tele-Holic

    800
    Feb 5, 2009
    Oceanside
    [​IMG]
     

  6. Soupy1957

    Soupy1957 TDPRI Member

    Age:
    60
    47
    Jun 29, 2010
    Connecticut
    The "Pine" around THESE parts is VERY soft wood. Suseptable to wharping and damage. Makes sense to me to move to a harder wood.

    Heck! We don't even think twice about NOT burning it in our wood stoves......

    -Soupy1957
     

  7. nadzab

    nadzab Friend of Leo's

    Mar 23, 2009
    New England
    I only burn hardwood in my stove...not a fan of creosote. However, I would not hesitate to use pine for a guitar body, I doubt it's much softer than basswood, which I like.
     

  8. Telemarkman

    Telemarkman Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Age:
    70
    Dec 6, 2005
    Norway
    The important part is that Leo found it too soft ;) ...
     

  9. nadzab

    nadzab Friend of Leo's

    Mar 23, 2009
    New England
    For firewood? ;)
     

  10. Telemarkman

    Telemarkman Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Age:
    70
    Dec 6, 2005
    Norway
    :lol::lol::lol:
     

  11. g'ter guy

    g'ter guy Tele-Meister

    Age:
    31
    313
    Sep 11, 2010
    Socal
    That's funny considering the 50's Squier Classic Vibe Tele is made of Pine. But then again, I'd hate to be that guy as well!

    In any case, I just bought a Pine body blank and am trying to decide what to do with it. Its made of reclaimed heart wood from the Civil War era and I don't know whether to use it to make a Strat, Tele, or a wierd combo of the two, Like a Tele body with the Strat contours or something. I'm also stuck on what to do for the finish. Origionaly I was going to do Road Worn Olympic White, but now I'm second guessing myself and am thinking about a natural or maybe even tinted clear finish. I'm bent on using wood hardener and a thick urethane coat in any case to try and protect the wood from dings as best as I can. I'm guessing that since it is 123 years old I probably should not have to worry about the sap... anyone got any suggestions?
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2010

  12. skelingtony

    skelingtony TDPRI Member

    66
    Apr 15, 2010
    UK
    You have to remember, it wasn't long after WW2 and there was a lot of senseless violins back then.



    Sorry...
     

  13. Axis29

    Axis29 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Jan 2, 2007
    Virginia, USA
    Because it's old growth Pine and it's been aging for so long, you may not have to worry so much about dings either.

    Old Growth trees are much harder than their new faster growing cousins being used for 2x4's today. Ever tried driving a 16p nail into a 100 year old 2x4 (one that actually measures 2"x4") Heck, even just old growth pine from the 50's is harder than today's wood. Just look at the growth rings per inch!


    Enjoy that old pine!
     

  14. Rob DiStefano

    Rob DiStefano Poster Extraordinaire Vendor Member

    Age:
    71
    Mar 3, 2003
    NJ via TX
    i like really light and resonant tele bodies, and that means using woods like paulownia and pine and cedar. yup, they're prone to denting. don't care. the lightness and resonance makes up for that nonsense. :D
     

  15. yowsa52

    yowsa52 TDPRI Member

    Age:
    65
    26
    Sep 4, 2006
    San Antonio
    Pincaster-shrill through amp, shrill acoustically also

    I built a Pine Squier 51 shaped using good Tele parts with a Bill Lawrence humbucker-rail bridge-tele style pickup. The Pine was sugar or white Pine, light and kiln dried. Disappointing. It has been relegated to practice and around the house beater. Alder has been the best bodies that I have found, ash has the best esthetics.
    I have been playing 44 years and still play out every week just as a hobby.
    I may be missing a component in all of this. This is just one man's experience and Your Mileage May Vary.
     

  16. middy

    middy Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    47
    Apr 28, 2010
    Dallas, TX
    Unless you've tried that same pickup and neck with a different body, how can you blame the pine?
     

  17. yowsa52

    yowsa52 TDPRI Member

    Age:
    65
    26
    Sep 4, 2006
    San Antonio
    Pine 51 Squier - not so good

    You are correct.

    Has anyone else had a shrill guitar using an All Parts Neck, a Bill Lawrence L48TL, CTS Pots, Wilkinson Brass Bridges?

    Perhaps someone will speak up then that would settle my presumptiveness.
     

  18. Fab186

    Fab186 TDPRI Member

    26
    Jan 2, 2011
    Surrey
    My first bass was a Squier p-bass and it was pine, there's about 3 dents in it, one of which actually broke through the finish and exposed the cheap wood. It also sounded very monotonous, and bland. It was a "beginner" bass. So I bought a fender p-bass special with an alder body, I was shocked with the thunderous low-end, and after fiddling with some nobs, I got it to be almost pure treble, with a very up-front sound, and everything in between.

    In my opinion, pine has a crappy middle range and it warps easily.
     

  19. savofenno

    savofenno Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 16, 2010
    Sweden
    What pine species do you mean?


    There is tens of pine species in the world, with very different wood hardness.
    Some species, say pine in my homeland Sweden are very hard. Some pine species in Japan and northern China(!) are very hard too.:cool:
    Never heard of Pine Squier Precisions, however cheap models, but some are from basswood, some agathis, which are tropical tree species, not pine.:!:
    I guess your experience come from weak pick-ups, i don`t know. My CV 50s Tele has very good tone, and it`s made of pine, good pine. Not soft, from southern parts of USA pine, which is what you are probably thinking of.:twisted:
     

  20. savofenno

    savofenno Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 16, 2010
    Sweden
    Check your wiring


    Wood can never be the reason for shrillness.:twisted: Check your soldering, and if wiring is really done correct.
    Just guessing that soldering bit.:neutral:
     

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