Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com Reiland Pickups
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com Reilander Pickups
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com Reilander Pickups
Join TDPRI Today

Peavey Generation Question??

Discussion in 'Other Guitars, other instruments' started by boneyguy, Dec 5, 2008.

  1. boneyguy

    boneyguy Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    58
    Mar 31, 2007
    victoria b.c. CANADA
    I was playing a used Peavey Generation today at the music store.
    I don't know alot about the Peavey Generation line but this one appears to be an older model than what I can find online.


    My questions:

    1) Were the original Generations made in the USA? From what I can see online all the new models are made in China and have 3 pickups. Also the necks are not tinted. The guitar I played has only two T style pickups and a nicely tinted neck.

    2) Another local store sells a made in China three pickup model new for $199. If the one I played is older and made in the USA would it be reasonable that it would be worth about $170 used because it's probably better quality than the Chinese made version?

    3) What would be a reasonable price to pay for the used Generation I've described. I'd post a picture but I can't even find a photo of a 2 pickup Generation as they all seem to be 3 pickups now.

    EDIT: I meant to post this in the Telecaster Discussion Forum. I'd actually prefer to have it there because I think I'd maybe get more responses if one of you fabulous moderators would move it there for me. Tanks. :lol:
     
  2. trag-o-caster

    trag-o-caster R.I.P.

    Mar 16, 2003
    Flushing, Michigan
    I'm sorry that I don't have any answers for your questions, but I just wanted to chime in and say that I played the butterscotch Generation at the local mom and pop music store and was quite smitten with it. Very nice indeed! It was the one with the 'bucker in the neck position. Other than that, it sure felt like I was playing a Tele. In fact I played it through a newish Transtube Bandit and thought that they sounded great together.
     
  3. JayFreddy

    JayFreddy Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    51
    Nov 6, 2006
    Dallas TX USA
    I collect the older US-made Peavey Generations that were made between 1988 and 1992. There were several incarnations of them.

    The one you saw sounds like a Generation Standard. Judging by completed sales on eBay, those seem to fetch between $200 and $350, depending on condition.

    None of the original US-made Genny's (pronounced "Jenny") had pickguards. The more recent Asian reissues all have pickguards, but the EXP series was made in Korea and is of higher quality than the current Chinese EX series.

    Here is a rundown of US-made Peavey Generations:

    Generation Standard - Chrome Tele-style string-through body bridge with 6 steel barrel saddles, contoured poplar body, Tele-style bridge pickup, Strat-style neck pickup. Flame maple neck with a rock maple fingerboard. Headstock is natural wood color. Circa 1988-1991.

    Generation S1 - Peavey Active pickups manufactured by Peavey that sound similar to Bartolini Active pickups of the same era. One single coil and one humbucker with a coil-tap switch. Contoured mahoganey body with a thick maple cap. Flame maple neck with rosewood fingerboard. String-through body, heavy brass Tele-esque bridge with 6 brass barrel saddles. Headstock is color-matched to the body. Circa 1988-1992.

    Generation S2 - Nearly identical to the S1, but with a Kahler Spyder locking tremolo. S2's typically have nicely figured maple tops. Peavey Active pickups. Headstock is color-matched to the body. Circa 1988-1992.

    Generation Custom - Very similar to the S2 with the Kahler Spyder tremolo and Peavey Active pickups, but with an ebony fingerboard instead of rosewood, and a poplar body instead of mahoganey to reduce weight. No maple cap, with a variety of period-correct "hair metal" paint jobs. Headstock is color-matched to the body. Circa 1989-1992.

    Generation S3 - Chrome Tele-style bridge with 6 steel barrel saddles, the same as the Generation Standard. Similar to a Nashville Tele with three passive single coil pickups on a 5-way switch, but only the bridge pickup is Tele-style. The neck and mid pickups are Strat-style. Alder body, routed with "sound chambers" so it is very light. It's basically a cross between a Thinline without the F-holes and a Nashville Tele. Flame maple top. Rock maple neck and fingerboard. Headstock is natural wood color. Circa 1991-1992.

    In around 2001 or 2002, Peavey did a trial run of a new US-built Generation for the NAMM show, with three P90-style soapbar pickups and a piezo pickup system in the bridge, similar to the ACM pickup system that came on their Korean-built EXP Generation ACM.

    There were only 6 of the soapbar Generations ever made. In addition to the 3 soapbar pickups, they are very distinctive for their "mother of toilet seat" veneer tops. I had a chance at one of these a few years back, but passed because it looked so tacky... In retrospect, I probably should have grabbed it when I had the chance.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2008
  4. Forum Sponsor Sponsored posting

  5. e-merlin

    e-merlin Doctor of Teleocity

    Jan 13, 2004
    Garden City, KS
    Hey, J, don't forget the Steve Cropper Signature model based on the Generation that was the reason he stopped playing Teles. He was a Generation player before he had a signature model.
     
  6. boneyguy

    boneyguy Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    58
    Mar 31, 2007
    victoria b.c. CANADA
    Thanks guys.

    I've just returned from another play of the Peavey and I have a bit more info. It's a Generation EXP which according to Jay is made in Korea. I don't know where they put the SN on these but I couldn't see one. The original QC stickers were on the neck plate as well as the music store's sticker so I'm guessing the SN may be hidden from view there.

    It sure plays and feels like a 'real' Tele much more so than most of the Squier stuff I've played except of course the CV Teles. But this thing plays and sounds good. It's got a very nice sunburst which I like and even the Peavey headstock is okay with me. Of the Tele-ish headstocks it's one of the better ones in my estimation. Also it has a nicely tinted neck which it seems the newer Chinese made instruments don't have.

    The body is 2 pieces of what may be alder but I'm not sure. Nice grain showing thru the burst.

    So I got the store talked down to $175 from $199. Do you reckon that's a fair price for this Generation EXP. It's in very good condition. I know they won't go any lower because the guy I'm dealing with is the person who took it in on trade and he paid out $160 for it (maybe he valued it too high in the trade?!!). He's a friend and a honest straight up good guy so I know he's not jerking me around on that.

    So is $175 + tax a good deal or not for one of these guitars?
     
  7. JayFreddy

    JayFreddy Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    51
    Nov 6, 2006
    Dallas TX USA
    Yup, I was only including Generations. Other US made Peavey T-types include the Reactor, Reactor AX, Cropper, and my new favorite, the Jerry Donahue Omniac... :cool:
     
  8. Dan German

    Dan German Poster Extraordinaire

    Well, mine is a Generation EX, and it's definitely made in China. 2 pups, nice tint on the neck. I got it for 104.50, which was 50% off, so that makes regular price here in Winnipeg $209.00 CDN. Unless that "P" makes a huge difference, even $175 used might be high. Although it's a very nice guitar for what it is.
     
  9. boneyguy

    boneyguy Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    58
    Mar 31, 2007
    victoria b.c. CANADA
    I guess at some point I have to ask is it $175 worth of guitar regardless of anything else. For example in the same store (L&M) there's a new Squier Affinity Tele going for $190 and the Peavey for $175 is a hell of alot more guitar than the Affinity is by a long shot. When I hold the Peavey it feels like a 'serious' instrument compared to the somewhat 'toyish' feeling Squier.

    I have no idea what difference the 'P' makes.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2008
  10. younkint

    younkint Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    63
    Oct 14, 2007
    Spring, Texas
    JayFreddy -

    Thanks for the Generation generations info. I saved that; it's hard to find.
     
  11. JayFreddy

    JayFreddy Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    51
    Nov 6, 2006
    Dallas TX USA
    Even those EX Generations are nice guitars for the money. They compare very favorably with similarly priced Squires.

    The Korean EXP Generations were originally designed to compete with Mexi-Fenders, but for a variety of reasons, they don't hold their resale value as well, so sometimes you can find crazy-good deals.

    Unfortunately, Peavey doesn't serialized their import models (i.e., non-USA models) by year. The serial numbers on those guitars are actually used internally by the Asian factories, and Peavey keeps the identity of their Asian suppliers secret. That's part of the reason Peavey imports can be found so cheaply...

    Even with Peavey's US-built guitars, Peavey only tracks the day an item leaves the Peavey factory warehouse. That means it's possible for a guitar that was made in 1989 to sit in Peavey's warehouse for two years, and when it finally ships, it gets listed as a 1991 guitar in Peavey's database. There is no way to confirm actual day or month of manufacture, unless you're standing right there as it comes off the factory floor.

    Since collectors tend to like details such as day of manufacture, maiden name of the lil' old lady who sanded the neck, etc., that's another reason why resale value on Peavey stuff isn't higher.

    They might not be collectable for "serious" collectors yet, but they are still quality musical instruments at a price that real musicians can afford.
     

    Attached Files:

  12. boneyguy

    boneyguy Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    58
    Mar 31, 2007
    victoria b.c. CANADA
    So Jay do you think $175 is a reasonable price to pay for a very nice EXP? It has no issues and plays very nicely.

    I was just thinking this morining that the Peavey feels and plays just as nicely as the Squier CV's that I've played.
     
  13. JayFreddy

    JayFreddy Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    51
    Nov 6, 2006
    Dallas TX USA
    Sure, why not? It's worth what it's worth. I believe the top of the line EXP ACM Generations (with the piezo pickup as well as the regular pickups) had an MSRP of $799 or even $899... Street was closer to $500, but it's worth what you think it's worth to you now, regardless of what it used to be worth.
     
  14. boneyguy

    boneyguy Doctor of Teleocity

    Age:
    58
    Mar 31, 2007
    victoria b.c. CANADA
    I already know all that. Just tell me what to do. :lol:

    Well I rented it for the weekend for $6. I've had it apart and had a good look around. I even put my GFS p/u's in it and I've decided to pass on it. I think it would take a little more effort and money than I'm willing to put into it to get it to where I'd be happy with it. Also I realized it just didn't give me that 'I must possess you' sorta jolt. I waited for it but it's not there.

    Back it goes.

    Here's some pics I took. That's a massive route for the neck p/u that would easily fit a p90. I guess they've routed it that way to accomodate the models that have the middle p/u. You'll also notice it has the tiny pots and crappy 3 way. Also the tuners are garbage.
     

    Attached Files:

  15. sido

    sido TDPRI Member

    3
    May 10, 2009
    Los Angeles
    I have a 1991 Peavey Generation S1 in blue. It is an overall excellent player. I previously owned a white 1994 Reactor style tele that was similar, and also very good. I modded the Reactor and gave it to my nephew, who has the talent I never will have. The Blue Generation is a better guitar, with overall better quality and remarkable tuning stability. Light weight and easy on the hands. Good stage guitar. Thin, flat neck. Pickups have good tone and somewhat low output. Solid U.S.-made quality. I should play it more often! But I'm going to put it up on Craigs List ... too much gear, too few nephews.
     
  16. DoyleLuna

    DoyleLuna TDPRI Member

    85
    Aug 4, 2010
    New Mexico
    Might have to look for a Jenny to add to my collection after I purge some unwanted gear
     
  17. jculpjr

    jculpjr TDPRI Member

    25
    Jan 31, 2013
    Florida
    Can you help me identify this Generation? Is this a Cropper Signature? Is $200 in line/good deal/run away? The neck is really, really nice. I love the guitar, but don't want to overpay for the market.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  18. JayFreddy

    JayFreddy Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    51
    Nov 6, 2006
    Dallas TX USA
    That's a Vintage EX, made in China. $200 is a little steep, these were $175 for while and then they were blown out by Daddy's Junky Music for $99. I think they're worth more than $99, I bought two at that price. Both needed fret levelling and I upgraded the tuning machines, but now they're nice players.
     
  19. dented

    dented Poster Extraordinaire

    Apr 17, 2006
    Back at the Beach
    :eek: They live! Call Alice.


    JayFreddy! Wake up! Man you are fast.
     
  20. JayFreddy

    JayFreddy Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    51
    Nov 6, 2006
    Dallas TX USA
    While some might scream "ZOMBIE!", I think the info is still relevant. Is that what you mean?!

    However, this thread does belong in the Other Guitars subforum...
     
  21. jculpjr

    jculpjr TDPRI Member

    25
    Jan 31, 2013
    Florida
    Thanks Jay- very helpful
     
IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.


Share This Page