Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Painting Metallics through a rattle can?

Discussion in 'Finely Finished' started by Jillo, Apr 8, 2017.

  1. Mr Green Genes

    Mr Green Genes Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 23, 2016
    MI
    ^^^ That's what I'm using. How easy was the Minwax to rub out, how many clear coats, and how much ambering?

    If I can get mine to look 1/2 as good as yours, I'll be very happy!
     
    PixMix likes this.

  2. Moab

    Moab TDPRI Member

    Age:
    49
    23
    Apr 9, 2017
    Pleasant Grove, Utah
    Jillo

    Experienced painters know you get far better results with a nice spray gun and all of the proper equipment to do the job right. A nice spray gun can be adjusted to spray a pattern of paint the painter likes and it will be a nice even pattern of paint flowing out of the spray gun. This is a big advantage over a rattle can. I have sprayed lots of things with rattle cans. Some rattle cans lay down paint better than others. You can not adjust a rattle can. You get what you get out of them. Sometimes you get an uneven pattern out of a rattle can. Then you get that rattle can that wants to spit and sputter paint as the paint left in the can gets low.

    However I know I can get very nice results with a rattle can due to my experience painting cars and over 400 guitars. Look and what some graffiti artist do with rattle cans...

    When I started painting guitars I got runs at first and I was an experienced car painter. That small guitar body with all those curves and different sides was something I quickly learned not to lay too much paint on too quickly to avoid runs. Sanding clear coat runs is a hard job and you learn to avoid doing that really quick. It is far better to lightly apply the spray paint on, let each coat tack up enough and apply an extra coat or two than try to lay the paint on too heavy and get a run in the clear coat. Worse is getting a run in the metallic paint and you will have to sand the run flat and start over before you clear.

    First time painters go really light on applying the paint. You slowly build up the paint through several light layers of sprayed paint. Using several coats gives you the proper coverage and thickness of paint. When you spray it is best to use a light that allows you to see how much paint you are putting down and keep the spray pattern moving at a nice even consistent motion. I overlap my spray pattern by about 50% as I cover anything I am painting. Another reason you go lightly on applying the paint because you are overlapping your spray pattern. The cutaway area on a guitar is the most likely area where you will get a run. I always go extra light on painting the cutaway because you tend to spray more paint in that small tightly curved area trying to get good coverage. Usually you will get too good of coverage right there and get a run. Go extra light in the cutaways. Spray an extra light coat if you have to rather than trying to spray too heavy.

    Let the paint tack up enough between coats or you will get a run.
     

  3. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

    Jun 22, 2010
    Osaka, Japan
    That color with that pickguard is AWESOME!!
     
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  4. PixMix

    PixMix Tele-Holic

    591
    Aug 30, 2008
    MI
    About 3 cans of Minwax, no tinting/ambering . Left the clear coat to cure well, then wet sanded with 600, 800, 1000, 1200, 1500, 2000, 2200, 2500, and then polished.

    I usually leave the clear coat to cure for 5-6 weeks, on this one I was done in less than three weeks from the day I sprayed the color to the day I polished it. It was summer, and I would hang the body out in the open air and sun.

    Spray gun would definitely work better, but nozzles on both Duplicolor and Minwax happen to be pretty decent.
     
    Flakey likes this.

  5. Mr Green Genes

    Mr Green Genes Tele-Afflicted

    Feb 23, 2016
    MI
    I sprayed the blue tonight. Thanks to the excellent advice from the gentlemen in this thread, it was much easier than I was expecting.

    The primer that I used was grey matte, and it went on beautifully and looked great. However, when I put the color coat on, I could see a small spot with some sanding scratches that I had missed. Key take away: inspect the primer coat thoroughly, under good light, and if your vision is at all like mine, use some magnifying reading glasses to check it out. Scratches that you can't really see in the primer coat become very obvious once you get the color coat on.

    Now I have a small area about the size of my thumb nail right on the front of the bass side horn that has a few small but visible scratches. I have to decide whether I want to re-do the entire thing, try to lightly sand and re-shoot the one small area, or just leave well enough alone and chalk it up as a learning experience. Better for you to learn from my mistake.

    On sanding: I had done the original scuffing using automotive wet/dry paper, which scared the crap out of me. I was having visions of trying to sand out the clear coat and screwing up the corners and edges.

    When I went to AutoZone to pick up the DupliColor, they had a product called Finish 1st Scuffing Pads in the same section as the sand paper. They basically look like flimsy, light weight nylon dish scrubbies, and they don't really look like they'd be all that effective. I picked up one of the P800 pads to try on the primer coat, and it's a world of difference. I can't even begin to describe how much easier they are to use, and how much better they work.

    One more thing to be aware of:

    I hung mine from a coat hanger through the neck plate hole and painted using side to side motions.

    It wasn't until I finished that I noticed the nozzle is set for using up and down motions.

    It was much easier than I was expecting, and came out much better than I thought it would, but it would've been that much easier if I had turned the nozzle 90° before spraying.

    It'll probably be another week or two before I have time off on a day that's suitable for painting, so it'll probably be a while before I can clear coat, but I'm going to go with the Minwax Clear Lacquer that PixMix suggested. I'll keep you posted.

    20170412_192824.jpg
     
    Tommyd55 and PixMix like this.

  6. tvvoodoo

    tvvoodoo Tele-Afflicted

    Jun 11, 2010
    Western Canada
    looks pretty good from here! suggest three "mist" coats of clear before you proceed to regular clear coating. again super light coats, spray dry even coverage. as each of those are down, let it sit for a bit to form a barrier, and have yourself a think. I have found with proper mist coating technique, if you do it well, practically anything is compatible with anything. but, if you lay the wrong stuff on top of the wrong stuff (or even the right stuff sometimes) even a "smidge" to heavy, foul words will be spoke.

    ok and the coat hanger? a word of warning, there are probably a dozen "Dang! It it fell off the coat-hanger" accidents you could search up on the TDPRI. Make a paint stick. just an 18" long 1X2 with a couple screws in it that go a 1/4" into the neck pocket base wood.
    Put a chunk of wire on the other end for hanging.

    much safer.
     

  7. jimdkc

    jimdkc Friend of Leo's Silver Supporter

    Age:
    61
    Mar 12, 2009
    Independence, MO
    Used that exact Duplicolor color on my Danelectro-inspired Longhorn Bass!

    [​IMG]
     
    Rock-Ola likes this.

  8. trev333

    trev333 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    I paint all my bodies in the horizontal,,,, using a long neck stick and a weighted down bar stool or a bench corner with clamps...,,,, if it's square you can have the body in 90 deg positions as you go round...

    I mist coat one side and the edges all round..... wait for a few minutes then turn it over and do the same on the back/sides..... careful to avoid runs on the edges/inside the horns.... I find the wet paint sits flat for that first few minutes skinning off, instead of wanting to slide down.....

    Do that 3 or 4 times over an hour for clear coats..... colour doesn't need more than a few coats to cover,,,building it up too much is a waste of paint if you are going to load the clear coats over the top later....

    mustang clear coat1.jpg
     

  9. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

    Jun 22, 2010
    Osaka, Japan

  10. Moab

    Moab TDPRI Member

    Age:
    49
    23
    Apr 9, 2017
    Pleasant Grove, Utah
    Mr Green Genes

    A trick the auto body guys do is if a car is sprayed in grey primer they will mist a very light coat of black primer over the grey primer. Then when the car or guitar primer is sanded any low trouble spots will show up and still show some black primer. Makes it easy to see.
     
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  11. Jupiter

    Jupiter Telefied Silver Supporter

    Jun 22, 2010
    Osaka, Japan
    that's a good one!
     

  12. trev333

    trev333 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    We call that misty black top coat a Guide coat...

    sanded down plenty of cars/truck cabs using this method.... sand filler, sand spray putty, some grey undercoat with a black guide coat, block sand that back .... and repeat in places until it's right...

    don't miss it at all....:D
     

  13. Zepfan

    Zepfan Friend of Leo's

    Nov 30, 2013
    Horn Lake, MS
    I used that Dupli-Color Perfect Match Light Blue Metallic in a light coat over their Metallic Silver on this guitar with 3 coats Glossy Clear. DSCF3815.JPG DSCF3787.JPG
     
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  14. trev333

    trev333 Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Same here... I use a silver undercoat for metallic colours.... and sometimes sprinkle flakes into the clear coats to get extra sparkle....
     
    Flakey likes this.

  15. Zepfan

    Zepfan Friend of Leo's

    Nov 30, 2013
    Horn Lake, MS
    I did Candy Red Metalflake over Copper(all enamel) on my bike. Bought all the rattlecan paint from Lowe's. Unfortunately, The Red hadn't fully cured and cracked all to hell while sitting in the sun while I was inside doing some guitar work.:mad::(

    Got to leave plenty of time between coats and all paint used must be good quality. That's why I now use the Dupli-Color. bike 013.jpg bike 014.jpg
     

  16. Flakey

    Flakey Friend of Leo's


    Looks exact like Fender's Charcoal Frost!
     
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  17. 61fury

    61fury Tele-Afflicted

    Aug 28, 2009
    knoxville, TN
    gorgeous, what is the specific shade on that? It looks flawless.

    And where did you get that pick guard? Spectacular tort.
     

  18. PixMix

    PixMix Tele-Holic

    591
    Aug 30, 2008
    MI
    Thanks! The color is Medium Wedgewood Metallic, it's a DupliColor, and cleared with MinWax Gloss Lacquer, also from spray cans. The tort is Spitfire, really expensive but the best tort that can be found today sans real vintage options.


    https://spitfiretortoiseshellpickguards.wordpress.com
     

  19. 61fury

    61fury Tele-Afflicted

    Aug 28, 2009
    knoxville, TN
    I thought that was a Spitfire, I'd just been looking at them. Looks like the sky is boiling fire.
     

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