Outdoor Grilling

Discussion in 'Bad Dog Cafe' started by chet again, May 14, 2019.

  1. chet again

    chet again Tele-Meister

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    The guy who owns the house across the street left an old propane grill out on the curb the year before last so I confiscated it. I never got into grilling before, even charcoal grilling because I always lived in apartments.

    Post your favorite grilling tips etc.

    BTW I did get a little mini charcoal grill this winter but haven't tried it out yet.
     
  2. jannodude

    jannodude Tele-Holic

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    057A6CC0-A362-4389-9343-78EAE645EBDD.jpeg
    A thermometer is going to be your best friend. You take the guess work out of under or over-cooking your food.

    Professional chefs can get away without using one because of the experience of cooking thousands of steaks with relatively similar widths/cuts (variables are kept within a small margin).
     
  3. AJBaker

    AJBaker Friend of Leo's

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    Stick a cheese in front, melt the surface, and scrape it onto a plate :D!
    (Find a separate stone to put it on and keep that stone cool)

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  4. Bergy

    Bergy Tele-Meister

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    We have been trying to rediscover outdoor grilling now that we have a backyard, too. Here are some thoughts;

    I like using those chimneys for getting the coals started with charcoal.

    A mistake I've seen a few times, folks throwing down the meat while the coals are still way too hot. I seem to remember the rule of thumb being if you can hold your hand a couple inches off the grate for 3-4 seconds you are in the ballpark. If it is too hot to do that you may wanna let the coals die down a bit. Although if you are attempting to sear something, you might aim for a hot spot.

    I've seen quite a few different methods of distributing the coals once you dump them out of the chimney. I like to spread them in a way that gives me hot zones and cool zones. A buddy of mine suggested I dump the coals in sort of a half moon shape. It worked pretty good for giving me variable temperature zones. I'll be interested to see what other suggestions folks give ya.

    If I am at all in a hurry or feeling unambitious, thats when I reach for the gas grill. I rub some olive oil on the grates before it gets hot to help keep the meat from sticking.

    Regarding meat sticking to the grill, a lot of times if you try to flip it too early it'll stick. Especially fish and chicken. Make sure you are placing fish and chicken skin-side down first.

    I've cooked in half a dozen restaurants over the years. My favorite method for getting diamond marks on a steak went kinda like this (the slash represents the orientation of the steak);

    Side A>>>first flip >>> Side B >>>second flip>>>Side A>>>third flip>>>Side B>>>pull steak
    / \ \ /

    If you are really specific with how you flip a steak you can keep track of a lot of em, and immediately tell how close to done they should be by the angle of the steak and how many prior grill lines it has. If diamond grill marks are what you are going after, you want those angles to be at roughly 45 degrees. I would always try to get the Side A looking really pretty, then make adjustments on Side B, and make sure they are plated with Side A up.

    There are a bunch of different methods for approximating the firmness of steaks cooked to different temps. I always used a thermocouple even though I got pretty good at testing them by touch. Steaks keep cooking after you pull them off the grill, you wanna pull it 3 degrees early or so. If you wanna aim for 125 degrees, pull it at 122.

    Lotsa folks recommend letting the steak rest for 10 minutes before you carve it up. That will allow the juice in the steak to redistribute and you won't see a bunch liquid when you start to get into it. You want that juiciness to stay in the steak.

    **EDIT** Just realized my steak flipping backslashes didn't line up where I placed em. They are in order, though.
     
  5. AJBaker

    AJBaker Friend of Leo's

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    For fish, I've read discussions on starting with the skin side up or down. I think the argument goes that if you're going to flip it, you're better off starting with the skin up. That way, the skin is still holding everything together when you flip it.
    Not my speciality though, I usually cook sausages or steaks.


    From https://www.weber.com/US/en/blog/ti...illits-easier-than-you-think/weber-31082.html:
    " [...] If you want to sear the flesh side, first be sure to oil the flesh side of the fish and place it flesh side down directly on the grate and grill according to recipe. The fish will naturally release itself from the cooking grate once it is finished being grilled on that side. If searing is not on your grilling game plan, simply place the fish skin side down directly on the grate."
     
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  6. johnny k

    johnny k Friend of Leo's

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    looking at the picture , i was thinking this guy must be from switzerland. Yes, I was right.
     
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  7. LutherBurger

    LutherBurger Friend of Leo's

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    Preheat the grill for 10 minutes before putting the food on it, and clean the grates with a wire brush after each use (I do that as soon as the food comes off).

    When necessary, apply vegetable oil to the grates with a paper towel held in a pair of tongs.

    Some areas of the grill will get hotter than others. Learn where those areas are and use them to your advantage.

    The electric igniters in grills don't last long in my experience, but there's usually a hole in the side where you can insert a long-shafted butane lighter. Do this as soon as the gas is turned on, with the lid open, and keep your head away from the grill when you ignite the gas.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2019
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  8. Greg_L

    Greg_L Tele-Holic

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    I'm pretty decent with fire and I only have three "rules":

    Cook very hot very fast when grilling, low and slow for smoking.
    Cook right up to being done how you want it, but not all the way.
    Let any meat rest after grilling.
     
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  9. drf64

    drf64 Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

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    Did the propane grill work?
     
  10. perttime

    perttime Tele-Afflicted

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    For me, gas grills are too civilized. If there is going to be barbeque, I prefer the more primitive and less predictable ways: charcoal or working with actual wood. Pick a kind of wood that isn't kicking sparks all over the place, though: no pine or spruce.
     
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  11. blowtorch

    blowtorch Telefied Ad Free Member

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    You grill INdoors? :eek:
     
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  12. perttime

    perttime Tele-Afflicted

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    Who?

    In some areas, it is common to have an outdoor kitchen attached to a house, or adjacent. Much like a real kitchen but one or two walls are missing. A pretty regular fireplace can also double for grilling.
     
  13. Bruxist

    Bruxist Friend of Leo's

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    I agree with this 100% but honestly, a good instant-read thermometer like the one pictured here will up your cooking game inside as well.
     
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  14. Bruxist

    Bruxist Friend of Leo's

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  15. Despres

    Despres Tele-Holic

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    I need to try this. Or just visit switzerland if that's a thing there.
     
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  16. Bob M

    Bob M Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

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    This is right on target for charcoal grilling. I would add that if you really want to do it up get a Weber kettle grill. They are versatile and can grill, smoke or slow cook for you.
     
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  17. TheGoodTexan

    TheGoodTexan Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    My wife and I looked at a home for sale a few years ago that had an indoor grill installed in the kitchen. This was not an overly large or fancy home either... in fact, we mostly passed on it because the whole thing was stuck in 1970. Looked like it could have been used in the film Casino.

    But the indoor grill kept calling my name...
     
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  18. TheGoodTexan

    TheGoodTexan Moderator Staff Member Ad Free Member

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    Regarding the OP...

    The biggest tips I have (which have already been mentioned)...

    Get a meat thermometer and learn how to use it.
    Create hot and cool spots in your grill, even if that just means keeping one gas burner at high and one at low.

    Also pull red meat from the grill about 6 or 8 degrees (F) before desired temp... and wrap them up or cover them up as they rest for a few minutes before serving. The meat will continue to rise in temp during this time, and in doing so, become more tender by holding onto internal juices.

    I don't pull chicken or fish prior to reaching proper temp.. esp chicken - undercooked chicken is too dangerous to risk it.
     
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  19. william tele

    william tele Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

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    Proper heat for steak is not intuitive. If you have to cook for rare, medium and well done, the more done the steak, the less intense the heat. To cook well done without charring the hell out of it you need more time and less intensity. For rare or medium rare (most preferred) I like the hottest fire I can get. You get a good sear without losing the bloody red or dark pink taste of a great cut of meat.

    I'm not exactly sure how to obtain the perfect well done steak. If someone asks for well done I just ask them politely, but firmly to leave...
     
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  20. Andy B

    Andy B Tele-Afflicted Gold Supporter

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    Any of Fred Thompson’s books are a great starting place.
     
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