Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

Nut Ping?

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by Rod Parsons, Feb 26, 2017.

  1. Rod Parsons

    Rod Parsons Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    70
    Sep 26, 2009
    Winchester, Va.
    I just built a parts-caster and cut my first bone nut. I learned how to cut it on U Tube and I think I did a great job, for my first try. But one string pings in the nut, when bending it. I have tried to smooth the grove out some... It is NOT binding in the nut, ... it makes a ;ping' sound when it slides from left to right in the groove. I have widened it a bit, but the pinging continues.. Is there a cure for this? It only happens with the non-wound D string. I lubed it, but it still pings.. Does anyone know why? Should I just cut another nut? Thank you.
     

  2. whiteop

    whiteop Tele-Afflicted

    Nov 11, 2010
    Texas
    If the nut slot is the correct depth and the string sits with half of it above the nut and the other half below try using a nut slot file and work the back of the nut at a downward angle that parallels how the string runs toward the tuner. Dont deepen the slot; simply notch the nut as mentioned after the string clears the nut. Blow and clean out the groove good and lube it afterwards. Finesse is the key. No big movements.
     

  3. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Age:
    48
    Aug 17, 2012
    Seattle
    If it's pinging, it's hanging up. A very light polish with 600 grit paper may be all you need if you think the slot was cut pretty well.
     
    Ricky D. likes this.

  4. moosie

    moosie Doctor of Teleocity Silver Supporter

    Age:
    60
    Jul 18, 2010
    Western Connecticut
    Is too binding. Bending causes the string to slide (lengthwise) within the slot, and yours cannot because of an imperfect cut. If the string had enough room to actually move side to side, the slot would be too wide.

    What guitar? 3x3 headstocks require extra attention, especially on D and G, because of the angle.

    Proper files are important, as is practice. If all else is as it should be, a tiny (TINY!) bit of lube (graphite, Big Bends, etc) in the slot will help.
     
    boris bubbanov likes this.

  5. dsutton24

    dsutton24 Poster Extraordinaire Gold Supporter

    Dec 29, 2010
    Illinois
    You're using a plain D string?
     

  6. Staggerlee666

    Staggerlee666 Tele-Meister

    141
    Jul 24, 2014
    MPLS
    If the slot is too wide, it means that the string wiggles inside (side to side). If there is even a little unevenness in the groove, it can cause issues.
     

  7. Rod Parsons

    Rod Parsons Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    70
    Sep 26, 2009
    Winchester, Va.
    Yes! That is what it is... it wiggles side to side and it seems, that maybe it is sliding across a tiny bump or something in the middle of the groove, that is making it ping.It's just a hair too wide, as at first, I thought it needed to be widened just a hair. I'll work on it more, [I did try some chapstick]... I have a few more nuts, if I can't get this one right.. Thanks for the tips, everyone..
     

  8. Staggerlee666

    Staggerlee666 Tele-Meister

    141
    Jul 24, 2014
    MPLS
    Try cutting that slot a little deeper and narrower and deepen the rest of the slots to match the depth. You may need to raise the whole nut in case all slots become too deep. I've done that successfully by glueing a thin piece of wood to the bottom of the but and then filing it down until I have proper height.
     

  9. Artslap

    Artslap Tele-Meister Silver Supporter

    Age:
    49
    466
    Mar 17, 2014
    Sydney, Australia
    Give the slots a going over with a lead pencil. The Graphite will act as a dry lube.

    CP.
     
    misterdontmove likes this.

  10. Frodebro

    Frodebro Doctor of Teleocity Ad Free Member

    Age:
    48
    Aug 17, 2012
    Seattle
    Try folding a piece of fine sandpaper (600 grit or finer) around the (loosened) string and gently buff out the slot with it. This will smoothen out any minor burrs or bumps without removing too much material.
     

  11. misterdontmove

    misterdontmove Tele-Meister

    209
    Mar 25, 2011
    Connecticut
    If the nut is cut properly, a very sharp pencil rubbed gently in each string slot when changing strings works like a charm. Once you get in the habit it becomes routine maintenance. And, there is no risk changing the depth or width of the slots.
     

  12. Brokenpick

    Brokenpick Tele-Holic

    828
    Oct 29, 2008
    Dixie

  13. telemnemonics

    telemnemonics Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    58
    Mar 2, 2010
    Maine
    Pack some baking soda into the nut slot and add a drop of super glue.
    It will harden, bond and fill the slot so you can cut it again.
    This is standard repair work on nut slots, and is also done to repair nicks in airplane propellers, so it is hard and durable in any conditions.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2017
    sjruvolo and Flakey like this.

  14. Rod Parsons

    Rod Parsons Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    70
    Sep 26, 2009
    Winchester, Va.
    Yes, it is a non-wound D string
    I will try this first.
    Thanks! I have heard of this method, and if all else fails, I will try this.
    Thanks! I will do this, when I get things working well.. Thanks to all of you. I have learned a lot from you all.
     

  15. Rod Parsons

    Rod Parsons Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    70
    Sep 26, 2009
    Winchester, Va.
    Okay! I just tried the sandpaper trick, #400 grade.. I didn't have #600 or finer, and it worked like a charm. No ping now.. It took about 30 seconds.. I now have all of your ideas in my nut making arsenal.. Again, thanks a lot.
     
    telemnemonics likes this.

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