Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups darrenriley.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

No sound out of neck pickup

Discussion in 'Tele-Technical' started by Sometimesyoudie, Jul 7, 2018.

  1. Sometimesyoudie

    Sometimesyoudie Tele-Meister

    228
    Feb 9, 2012
    Atlanta, GA
    just installed a set of Duncan broadcasters, followed the diagram

    Bridge pickup sounds great with no buzz at all

    Neck pickup has no volume but when you crank up the gain you hear it slightly

    I check and rechecked the wiring even resoldered all the neck pickup wires and nothing

    Bad pickup? Bad switch? Any ideas?
     

  2. TimTam

    TimTam Tele-Meister

    382
    Jun 4, 2010
    Melbourne
    When control plate and output jack are out of the guitar and plugged in, do you get normal response to tapping on neck pickup with a screwdriver .. or nothing ?
     
    LutherBurger likes this.

  3. Sometimesyoudie

    Sometimesyoudie Tele-Meister

    228
    Feb 9, 2012
    Atlanta, GA

    Yeah nothing when tapping. There’s a diffirence in the grounding noise when I put my finger on the pickup though. Like a slight hum, which makes me think that there is output but my wirings wrong but I just can’t find where it’s messed up
     

  4. Dixon in Korea

    Dixon in Korea Tele-Meister

    Age:
    52
    112
    Feb 17, 2018
    Busan, South Korea
    Is it a switch that was functioning before, or is it a new switch? A couple of days ago, I needed to slightly bend the contacts on a new switch because they weren’t making proper connections (the blade wasn’t properly aligned, so bridge position resulted in bridge+neck).

    If you have a spare jack, you can wire the pickup directly to it to verify that the pickup itself isn’t the problem.

    A tuning fork is also great tool for checking pickups. If you hold the vibrating fork near the pickup (like it’s a string), it will produce a tone. It’s a great way to test wiring without needing to install the pick guard and strings.
     
    LutherBurger likes this.

  5. SPUDCASTER

    SPUDCASTER Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Pictures?

    Time to get out the multi-meter. If you have one, check the output of the pickup.

    Does the pickup have 2 or 3 leads?

    Maybe refloat the solder at the eyelets.
     

  6. Sparky2

    Sparky2 Tele-Afflicted

    Age:
    59
    Apr 15, 2017
    Harvest, Alabama

  7. Sometimesyoudie

    Sometimesyoudie Tele-Meister

    228
    Feb 9, 2012
    Atlanta, GA
    09FFC43E-3E29-4477-826D-AF5703EAE641.jpeg It’s a brand new build all parts are brand new, I’m going to take it out and reverse the leads of the bridge and neck to troubleshoot since the bridge is working fine. I’ll send some pics of the wiring to see if anybody notices something I don’t
     

  8. Sometimesyoudie

    Sometimesyoudie Tele-Meister

    228
    Feb 9, 2012
    Atlanta, GA

    I considered this I played with the blades and tried to see if it wasn’t making contact. My other thought was I might have over flowed the solder and it got down in there somehow but it doesn’t look super messy
     

  9. Sometimesyoudie

    Sometimesyoudie Tele-Meister

    228
    Feb 9, 2012
    Atlanta, GA
    Here’s some pics of wiring sorry for lighting
     

    Attached Files:


  10. LutherBurger

    LutherBurger Friend of Leo's

    Oct 29, 2013
    NYC
    Are you getting sound from the neck pickup when the switch is in the middle position?
     

  11. Sometimesyoudie

    Sometimesyoudie Tele-Meister

    228
    Feb 9, 2012
    Atlanta, GA
    No bridge and middle sound identical only bridge
     

  12. jimilee

    jimilee Tele-Holic

    Age:
    47
    684
    Dec 19, 2017
    Chattanooga
    Can you show what wires go to the neck pickup and post the wiring diagram you used?
     
    LutherBurger likes this.

  13. Sometimesyoudie

    Sometimesyoudie Tele-Meister

    228
    Feb 9, 2012
    Atlanta, GA
     

    Attached Files:


  14. Sometimesyoudie

    Sometimesyoudie Tele-Meister

    228
    Feb 9, 2012
    Atlanta, GA
    Ok so I just swapped neck position with bridge position on the switch

    The bridge pickup worked in neck position,
    Neck pickup DIDNT work in bridge position

    So I’m guessing theres an issue with the neck pickup. How can I verify for sure? Ohm it out?
     

  15. LutherBurger

    LutherBurger Friend of Leo's

    Oct 29, 2013
    NYC
    :(

    Yeah, see what the resistance is between the ends of the two leads, and also between the two eyelets on the pickup.
     

  16. tessting1two

    tessting1two Tele-Meister

    370
    Apr 13, 2014
    Southern California
    Is there shielding in the neck pickup cavity? It may be time to unscrew the pickup and inspect the solder points & wires on the bottom. If the pickup is shorting against the shielding you won't get proper readings with a meter either.
     
    LutherBurger likes this.

  17. Sometimesyoudie

    Sometimesyoudie Tele-Meister

    228
    Feb 9, 2012
    Atlanta, GA
    No shielding I had planned on it eventually but I can’t even get signal out of this thing

    And surprisingly the bring pickup is hum free

    Welp guess it’s time to see how good Seymour Duncan customer service is! Haha
     

  18. SPUDCASTER

    SPUDCASTER Poster Extraordinaire Platinum Supporter

    Didn't someone mention "time for the multi-meter"?:)
     

  19. Mincer

    Mincer Tele-Meister

    Age:
    48
    269
    Dec 19, 2017
    Tampa Bay Area
    Wire each pickup directly to the jack to test them (one at a time). It is unlikely both are defective, but possible, I guess. If they work, wire them back into the circuit, and get a multimeter.
     
    kingvox likes this.

  20. kingvox

    kingvox Tele-Meister

    168
    Mar 23, 2017
    USA
    +1 on wiring the pickup directly to the jack to test it. A multimeter is a good tool to use but you could do this test right now without having to buy a multimeter (even though they're only 1 dollar at my local Harbor Freight).

    I actually keep a spare jack on hand just to make this easier: cable comes from your amplifier, plugs into a jack that is connected to absolutely nothing. Take alligator clips and attach each lead of your pickup to either tab of the jack.

    Turn your amp on, and then tap the pickup lightly with a screwdriver. You should hear the tapping through your amp. If you don't, the pickup is dead. If you hear it, but it's really quiet, it's possible that the solder joints on the eyelets of the pickup need to be re-flowed. If the start or finish lead of the pickup have become disconnected you will get no sound at all. Audible but quiet pickups USUALLY mean that the solder joints on the eyelets need to be re-flowed, assuming that there are no cold solder joints in the actual circuit in the guitar itself.

    I ALWAYS use a bit of Nokorode flux when re-flowing solder joints (or making initial solder joints, for that matter). Nokorode is the best stuff I've found and I've been using it for years:

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000KZUT60/?tag=tdpri-20

    Low output can also mean the magnets need to be re-magnetized. This is where a multimeter would come in handy. If you're getting quiet output, but the multimeter is getting a perfectly normal and solid DCR reading of the expected value, that would point to the magnets. That is extremely unlikely, but it does happen on rare occasions.

    My guess is that the joints on the pickup itself need to be re-flowed. If you're getting output, but it's super quiet, this is likely the case. If the start or finish wires were disconnected you would not be getting anything at all. Internal shorts in the coil are also possible, but at that point the only solution is to tear down the entire coil and rewind it.

    Very carefully fluxing and re-flowing the solder joints on the eyelets is easy to do. I would run these tests before doing that, although as you're perfectly capable of soldering, this is basically a zero risk operation unless you are careless. It does help to clamp the flatwork of the pickup in a small vise so you can really focus on reflowing the joint without worrying about the pickup moving.

    Just put some flux on a toothpick and give the joint a light coat, then hit it with a hot soldering iron for several seconds, until you see the solder liquefy for a second or two. Repeat on the other eyelet. I've done this fix many times, after having the exact same problem: pickup is "audible" but has almost no output.
     
    Sometimesyoudie likes this.

IMPORTANT: Treat everyone here with respect, no matter how difficult!
No sex, drug, political, religion or hate discussion permitted here.