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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

New Yamaha THR100H

Discussion in 'Modeling Amps, Plugins and Apps' started by GuitOp81, Aug 30, 2015.

  1. GuitOp81

    GuitOp81 Tele-Holic

    515
    Oct 13, 2013
    NJ

  2. fender4life

    fender4life Friend of Leo's

    Sep 18, 2011
    los angeles
    I hate this. I love my mustang and can't see any reason to change. But i have read so many reviews on the THR10 that say it blows thier mustang away i can't help be interested in this 100. The 10 no matter how good didn't appeal to me being a 10 watt practice amp. But this new one changes that. If the price is cheap i will likely have to try one considering i can do so free for 30 days. I will almost want to to not be as good tho. :) I wouldn't even be considering it if not for so many reviews saying the small ones sound better than the mustang. Plus it appears to be super tweakable. Only drag is no combo, but you never know what we'll see once they hit the showroom floor. Plus i have has yamaha digital reverbs and delays before and preferred them to all other. Thats a big plus.
     

  3. StormJH1

    StormJH1 Tele-Holic

    Here's the thing that's bothering me - Yamaha did a pretty remarkable job of taking what was basically a solid-state modelling amp married with a glorified HiFi desktop speaker set, and convincing everyone from pro guitarists to bedroom hacks that they needed this as a "third amp". The THR10 is a great product, and it offers things because of its size and ease-of-use that even some of the better small combo amps can't match.

    This THR100 head may be a great product, but it's something completely different. It's portability is borderline irrelevant since you need to plug it into a 112 or 412 cabinet (and micro heads are already pretty commonplace in the market). It has an effects loop, but apparently none of the built-in effects (except for reverb) that made the THR10 so convenient for plug-and-play use. And while there's an assumption that THR sounds supersized into a 100W head will sound amazing of a cabinet, this is a still a solid state modelling head that will have to offer clear advantages over tube heads and Kemper/Helix-type solutions for people to actually want to use it.

    If you were in the market for a 100-watt head, you're probably over the moon about this. I'm sure many THR users are professional guitarists, and Yamaha makes great stuff, so this is a serious product. But I can't think of a reason why it's a product for me. I don't need that much amp, and I really wish there had been a combo option or something with more intermediate power offered.
     

  4. GuitOp81

    GuitOp81 Tele-Holic

    515
    Oct 13, 2013
    NJ
    I agree, and the price for the two options (single or dual) is going to be in the $700-$1000 range. Almost nothing in common apart from the brand.
    I was following this in the amp owners section so I don't want to double post, but the last piece of info from the video also does not change much my personal preference for the smaller THR10

     

  5. StormJH1

    StormJH1 Tele-Holic

    Ugh. Well I don't know if you saw the actual MSRP listing, but it looks about $900 for the single channel and $1350 for the dual. It will be in stores for less than that, but even at $500, this just isn't a product for me.

    I guess the most positive spin I can put on this for Yamaha is that a lot of love must have went into this project and they aren't interested in printing money. Because there are so many common-sense improvements to the basic THR10 concept (line out/extension jack, effects loop, slightly larger speakers/wattage, better preset mgmt, etc.) that they could have EASILY sold to clowns with me with wallet open and ready.

    The gear market is so crowded - it's really incredibly rare to carve out a profitable niche for a "must have" item, like the THR10 became over the past 3 years for many of us. To just walk away from that (at least for the time being) and focus on a $1,000 solid state head is perplexing to me.
     

  6. foundjoe

    foundjoe Tele-Holic

    632
    Apr 28, 2013
    Kansas
    For what this does, you could get a Blackstar ID series with the TVP features for much less money or even a real tube amp, such as the Egnater Tweaker series that still does the same type of thing. I don't quite get it and why Yamaha made this a THR product.
     

  7. fender4life

    fender4life Friend of Leo's

    Sep 18, 2011
    los angeles
    Well, i'm kinda glad to hear the price because like i said i have no need or reason to buy a different amp as happy as i am with my mustang. But this was so intriguing to me, and i have no issues with a lack of effects since all i use is a bit of dealy and on very rare occasion chorus. But at those prices i see no need to consider it any more.
     

  8. StormJH1

    StormJH1 Tele-Holic

    Glad somebody else mentioned the Tweaker - I had the same comparison in mind but didn't speak up because I don't have firsthand experience with one. But there's an example of a solid amp that you could go find used right now in head format for 25% of the price of this thing, and they offer it as a combo and at lower wattage options.

    I've heard a few demos. Throw out the price and the brand/name, etc...and yeah, I think it sounds good. I remain a huge fan of Yamaha and think their guitars are vastly underrated. It's just a shame that they went in this direction because they've always had a problem in the U.S. with marketability and price point. As in, people who actually try out their stuff like it, but their $350 and $600 guitars are a tough sell to buy something with the name of a Japanese conglomerate on the headstock instead of Fender, PRS, etc.

    With the THR10, they really had made some headway and built up goodwill. People laughed at the THR10 when it was first unveiled, but the impressions were overwhelmingly positive once it launched. I think they just fell in love with the idea that they could make a high-wattage head, and they focused time and energy on that instead of making some common sense improvements to an entirely new category of amp that they had carved out for themselves.
     
    savofenno likes this.

  9. foundjoe

    foundjoe Tele-Holic

    632
    Apr 28, 2013
    Kansas
    Here's the web page with more details about this new amp head:

    THR Head
     
    savofenno likes this.

  10. macdog

    macdog Tele-Holic

    622
    Sep 21, 2007
    Melbourne, Australia
    This. I adopt a wait and see; the amp could be brilliant.
     
    savofenno likes this.

  11. lefty73

    lefty73 Tele-Holic

    Age:
    44
    988
    Jan 19, 2011
    03842
    Years ago I had a Yamaha DG60-112 and it remains one of the finest solid-state amps I have ever played. I miss it; I sold it on Ebay to fund the purchase of other music gear. In hindsight, I should've kept it. Dang. Fun fact: luminaries such as Allan Holdsworth and Ty Tabor were on board with the DG amp series for a brief time.

    Seeing the THR100 head immediately brought back memories of the DG series. Similar in tone (at least what I heard on the video) and physical layout. I think Yamaha "gets it" with the THR series, and intro'ing the platform with some lunchbox style amps is a stroke of genius. See what the demand is for the smaller boxes, and if people legitimately dig the tones, spend a few extra R&D dollars to give it the muscle to really move some air.

    I'm with macdog on this one: wait and see, and it could be great.
     

  12. foundjoe

    foundjoe Tele-Holic

    632
    Apr 28, 2013
    Kansas
    The new dual THR head has an almost identical knob layout as the DG series. It looks like they just repackaged the DG with cosmetics that match the THR combos and gave the new head fewer voice settings than the DG. Did the DG retail for as much as the new THR head? It doesn't really look like they're breaking any new ground, and I'm still not understanding why the handle is on the side of the amp head.
     

  13. lefty73

    lefty73 Tele-Holic

    Age:
    44
    988
    Jan 19, 2011
    03842
    I'm going way back, but the DG60-112 was, to the best of my recollection, around $450 to $500 brand new. The DG80 was more expensive (bigger power section and built-in effects), and the DG130 was more expensive still.
     

  14. GuitOp81

    GuitOp81 Tele-Holic

    515
    Oct 13, 2013
    NJ
    savofenno likes this.

  15. Pepi

    Pepi Tele-Afflicted

    Aug 8, 2004
    Indiana
    That Yamaha guitar makes that amp shine :eek:
     

  16. still_fiddlin

    still_fiddlin Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

    May 6, 2009
    Texas
    Interesting. When Yamaha bought Line 6 I thought there might be some meshing or rationalization of their product lines, but I'm not seeing it yet. Of course, an M13 with MIDI controller out to add in the amp switching on the Yamaha wouldn't be a big stretch I'd think.

    Anyway, I'm guessing Yamaha has made a good product - time will tell if there's a market for it. (Somewhat veering into Tech 21 territory, but digital and ~3x $.) From postings I've read here, the combination of modeling and effects in Line6 and even beloved Mustangs is a bit more than a lot like. (I certainly find my Trademark 10 + M5 plenty for 99% of my home noodlings and my POD HD sits in its case now that I don't use it weekly in church.)

    I'd like to try the 100H + 1x12 cabinet.
     

  17. still_fiddlin

    still_fiddlin Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

    May 6, 2009
    Texas
    If I got that GAK video right, you can just take the head and use it direct, without needing a speaker load? That makes this even more interesting. Amp modeling + drive & reverb, footswitch controlled, and use with a cab or direct? Hmm. If I only had a use for such a thing...
     

  18. foundjoe

    foundjoe Tele-Holic

    632
    Apr 28, 2013
    Kansas
    Even though this head doesn't have the modulation effects that the THR combos have, it does say the boost function has three different types, which basically makes that like an overdrive stomp-box modeling effect and the video says there are different reverb types (hall, room, plate and spring) and speaker cabinet impulses, so that does at least give additional visual flexibility that isn't obvious at first glance. It does appear those additional setting are only available through the software editor and USB connection.
     

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