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New saddles for CVC tele? Worthy upgrade?

Discussion in 'Squier Tele Forum' started by admsx, Sep 6, 2017.

  1. admsx

    admsx TDPRI Member

    Age:
    34
    15
    Sep 5, 2017
    NJ
    I have heard the saddles on the CVC's are mediocre and are a great upgrade that you will hear. Is this true?

    Was thinking about picking these Glendale's up as I like to retain the look of the threaded saddles.



    [​IMG]
     
    zippofan likes this.

  2. brobar

    brobar Tele-Holic

    Age:
    42
    501
    May 30, 2017
    Colorado
    I swapped out the steel saddles on my CVC with compensated brass saddles which I much more prefer. However, it lost some of that spank on the low E & A strings so I replaced that saddle with a compensated aluminum saddle and it brought that spank right back.

    I liked the look of the threaded steel, but I just preferred the tone of the brass better... so I went with a more affordable Wilkinson version of the Glendale Intone Cutting Edge compensated saddles.

    IMG_0293.JPG
     
    tintag27 and TeleRooo like this.

  3. nicod98

    nicod98 Tele-Holic

    539
    Jul 7, 2014
    Belgium
    I think we are talking more about personal preference here... Only thing about CV hardware is a "cheaper" chroming of the bridge which seems to get cloudy after a few years in some circumstances.
    I'm keeping the CVC saddles for now, as I seem to have no reason to change them.
     

  4. VintageSG

    VintageSG Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

    Mar 31, 2016
    Huddersfield, UK
    I fitted some Wilkinson compensated brass saddles to mine, but the e kept snapping where it passed over the saddle. I tried light sanding with some 1200 grit wet'n'dry, to no avail. I went with uncompensated brass cut with a string guide. No more string snappage, nice tone and intonation is close enough not to be a bother.
    The only reason I moved away from the threaded steel in the first place was the e snapping at annoyingly regular intervals. Snapped right where the string passed over the saddle, every time.
     
    guitarguy1992 likes this.

  5. guitarguy1992

    guitarguy1992 Tele-Meister

    106
    Nov 17, 2015
    Kentucky
    Oh my gosh please tell me what exactly you mean by string snapping. Like at certain notes on the neck on my tele it sounds like the note makes a plink sound like it cuts the note off. I was thinking this was a nut issue
     

  6. dbigers

    dbigers TDPRI Member

    Age:
    44
    3
    Sep 13, 2017
    USA
    What you are describing sounds like a high fret. I believe Vintage was actually referring to the string breaking.
     
    guitarguy1992 likes this.

  7. guitarguy1992

    guitarguy1992 Tele-Meister

    106
    Nov 17, 2015
    Kentucky
    Hmmm interesting! I've taken it to two luthiers in the area and neither could really produce what I was hearing. But to be honest it really is super evident on overdrive tones not so much clean tones. How would one spot a "high fret"?
     
    Chanan likes this.

  8. dbigers

    dbigers TDPRI Member

    Age:
    44
    3
    Sep 13, 2017
    USA
    They sell "Fret Rockers". Basically a straight edge that can cover three frets at a time. Ideally, it should contact all three at the same time. You move it down the guitar, hopefully they will be reasonably consistent. If they aren't, you will be able to "rock" the straight edge--indicating either a low or high fret.

    A low fret can cause the same problem. When you fret the guitar at that fret, the ones past it, further down the neck will be "higher" even if they are the same height as the rest.

    Either way, a high fret or a low fret can cause problems.

    I am not sure on the price for them. I worked in Metrology for 17 years. During that time I amassed a lot of straight edges, measuring devices, and gages/gauges.
     
    guitarguy1992 likes this.

  9. Ira7

    Ira7 Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    61
    Jan 8, 2008
    Coral Springs, FL
    I think he means breaking.
     

  10. VintageSG

    VintageSG Tele-Afflicted Ad Free Member

    Mar 31, 2016
    Huddersfield, UK

    Yup, breaking.

    It's a language thing. Snap/break, whatever. Failure of the string to maintain an integral whole in the region where contact is made twixt string and saddle :)

    I am a heavy handed so and so though, so that would contribute to my woes. Interesting, for limited values of interesting, to note I haven't had to replace a failed e since switching to the grooved brass.
     
    tintag27 and guitarguy1992 like this.

  11. BorderRadio

    BorderRadio Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Apr 2, 2014
    Phoenix, AZ
    They're threaded steel saddles, just like the original artifact. Fender sells their "Pure Vintage" 60s saddles, and they're effectively the same as the CVC. Nothing wrong with them, I saved mine. Same issues though as the originals: compromised intonation, potential for string buzz.

    I used the Groovy 60s for awhile with my Bigsby B5 Tele, sold em for another upgrade. The nice thing about multiple grooves on your saddles is the ability to change your string spacing to preference. String breakage likely occurs because of burrs on the metal or a string is riding too close to the height screw hole, or both. 1200 grit won't take care of a burr, should use something a little more abrasive and get into the recess. Glendale's saddles are not threaded/have pitch, they are machined grooves that look the part. You won't any issue with burrs with his gear--good stuff.
     

  12. Ira7

    Ira7 Poster Extraordinaire

    Age:
    61
    Jan 8, 2008
    Coral Springs, FL
    No one's listening to the spank on your E and A.

    They're looking at that gorgeous pickguard.
     
    brobar likes this.

  13. TheBadHombre

    TheBadHombre TDPRI Member

    Lo, Some entertainingly humorous banter come from the renown “Vintage”. Alas, how I long for the hours I spent with iPhone clutched in thine hands typing sentences such these.......
     

  14. rich815

    rich815 Tele-Afflicted Silver Supporter

    Do it. And the bridge plate too while you're at it. Get one that's better than pot metal. You'll likely hear a difference. If not or if you don't like it resell at barely a loss I'd think or minimal.
     

  15. zippofan

    zippofan Tele-Meister

    414
    Mar 16, 2014
    Pennsylvania
    I've tried a bunch, and currently settled on the brass Callaham's on my CV Thinline. I had steel on for awhile, both CJ Guitar Tooling (great saddles!) and Rutters but with the mahogany body it was just a bit brighter than I like.
    I'm currently trying a set of the Philadelphia Luthiers Supply compensated brass on my CV Duo Sonic, love 'em so far. I had the Glendale Groovy 60's on there, but the tone was a bit 'clanky', the basswood body on the Duo is super bright. The same saddles on my Standard Tele are just fine.
     

  16. SolidSteak

    SolidSteak Tele-Afflicted

    Apr 27, 2016
    USA
    Eh, I dunno if it makes any difference or not... but it's one of those things that's pretty cheap to do, so why not? I put the compensated brass saddles on my CVC when I had it because I liked the look more. Also they seemed more solid and less likely to rattle, but that's probably all in my head. When I sold it I mentioned to the guy, "Oh I have the saddles that came with it if you want them" but he didn't care.
     

  17. Uncle Bob

    Uncle Bob Tele-Meister

    184
    Mar 5, 2017
    West Virginia
    <snip>
    You don't need to buy anything. A credit card will work fine.
     

  18. TheDTrain

    TheDTrain Tele-Holic

    Age:
    33
    650
    Jun 12, 2010
    Jersey
    Having the same problem with the buzz thought it was the saddles
     

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