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Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com
Asher Guitars WD Music Products Amplified Parts Mod Kits DIY Nordstarnd Pickups Warmoth.com

New (and first) build: 5f2a Tweed Princeton

Discussion in 'Shock Brother's DIY Amps' started by theprofessor, Nov 2, 2017.

  1. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

    Aug 8, 2016
    Chattanooga, TN
    I spent the afternoon soldering the parts onto the fiberboard. Would you all take a look at this and see what you think? I did not like the eyelets that shared three leads! You get one in, the others pop out! Also, I think I was soldering too hot, at least at times. I got some small streams of shooting solder coming off the board a few times (!). Also, there were a few places where I really cut the leads too short. The metal oxide dropping resistors, for example, could have been longer. I think they'll work, but I should have not cut them as close as I did.

    Thoughts? Here's the front of the board [EDIT: I posted some better pictures in the next post]: IMG_4010.JPG

    And here's the back. You'll see that there are some spots where solder is oozing out the back. Do I just snip that off before attaching the cloth leads?
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Nov 4, 2017

  2. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

    Aug 8, 2016
    Chattanooga, TN
    Here are some better pictures of the board: IMG_4417.JPG IMG_4418.JPG
     

  3. tubeswell

    tubeswell Friend of Leo's

    Jul 1, 2008
    NZ
    These are all practical learning lessons where you figure out your style. I dry fit component leads into eyelets, by making right angle bends in the leads and pushing these through the eyelet holes dry, then wrapping the overhang around on the reverse side of the board (using needle nose pliers to grip the leads tightly), and leaving a small overhang tucked up against the board (The smaller the overhang, the better, in case you want to remove a component later). I also put the connecting wires into the eyelet holes dry, then I solder everything in place, so there's only one instance of soldering for each eyelet. Then I trim off any surplus lead overhang on the reverse side of the board with a decent pair of snippers. YMMV

    Use your hot iron tip to melt off excess solder blobs.
     
    King Fan likes this.

  4. Axis29

    Axis29 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Jan 2, 2007
    Virginia, USA
    I fiddled with running the flying wire leads from underneath the board or from the top. I looked at vintage pics and found the ladies at Fender ran them from the top of the board off to ground and to the off board components. I was reusing as much of the vintage cloth pushback wires as I could (my amp had been absolutely abominated and need to be stripped and reconfigured from scratch)... So, my leads were anywhere between two inches to four. I ended up cutting all of them shorter before soldering to tube sockets, grounds, etc. But, I figured, better to have too much than not enough, right?

    I also tried to insert as many of those flying leads into the eyelets before I soldered anything up as I could... It was a bit of a juggling act. So, I worked my way across the board, inserting the flying lead, soldering that eyelet, on down the line.

    I realize you've already soldered all the on board components now... But, maybe for the next build? LOL
     

  5. King Fan

    King Fan Friend of Leo's Ad Free Member

    Jan 1, 2013
    Salt Lake City
    Tubeswell explains how I solder eyelets better than I could! :)

    Lead length will vary, and wire is insanely cheap compared to rebuilding. With cloth wire, too, you can (and want to) contour the run right out into the corner of the chassis to lie against the metal as much as possible, not run it through the air (you want shortest tidy run that lies against chassis). Plus also, you may want to shape the lead to cross others or parallel others or wrap up to pots or.... Plus finally it's easier to feed a long length of stripped wire through a pot or speaker lug, form it to make a tight pinch, and then cut it later rather than try to keep a few mm of bare wire bent in the right place before you solder.
     

  6. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

    Aug 8, 2016
    Chattanooga, TN
    Thanks! I just ordered some new metal oxide dropping resistors to put in there, just to be safe. And just to be really safe, I've also got some new F&T's on the way. That side of the board was the last one I was doing, and I felt like I cut the leads a little shorter over there. I'm borderline OCD, so it's got to be "just right." That said, i think my solder joints look fine and solid, and that the leads are strongly connected to the solder which is strongly connected to the eyelet. So I'm probably just over-doing it, but...

    Anyway, now I'm going to start putting the cloth wire runs in, using liberally-measured lengths. So more to come...
     

  7. RLee77

    RLee77 Friend of Leo's

    May 15, 2016
    Silicon Valley
    Your soldering looks good. Ideally one would mark which eyelets take hookup wire and wait to solder those until the wire is in place, so each connection is only heated once, as tubeswell said. But no big deal; you can just use a solder sucker to remove solder from eyelets that need wires, tin the wire, push it thru, and solder.
    Also once you get your hookup wires attached to the board, try to minimize flexing them near the eyelet; they can weaken and break.
     

  8. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

    Aug 8, 2016
    Chattanooga, TN
    Thank you! I was hoping someone would say that. Very cool. I do have a solder sucker, so I'll just do what you said. Next time, I'll know to do both the front and the back all at once. Cheers!
     

  9. tweedman2001

    tweedman2001 Tele-Holic

    826
    Aug 3, 2014
    North of There, NY
    Looks good and excellent ideas. I have one too for a future build. Try to wrap some lead from the resistor around the cap leads on the far right. It's better if there is a "physical" connection besides just solder.
     

  10. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

    Aug 8, 2016
    Chattanooga, TN
    Thanks, tweedman2001! I'll go back and do that.
     

  11. keithb7

    keithb7 Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    46
    Jan 9, 2010
    Western Canada
    One tip I learned by trial and error is solid core wire will flex “X” number of times, then it will break. Solid core wire holds the shape you give it when placing it.

    “X” = 1 more trial fit inside the chassis at midnight.

    Strand wire is a group of multiple copper wires spiraling along inside the shielding. This non-vintage type wire can be flexed seemingly forever. I gave up test-bending it. Strand wire is rogue. It generally won’t stay in place when you are placing it in the chassis.
     
    King Fan likes this.

  12. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

    Aug 8, 2016
    Chattanooga, TN
    Haha! Yes! I must say, I really don't like the thin leads on the Xicon wirewounds or on the filter capacitors. I prefer the thicker copper leads on some of the bigger carbon comp resistors. I don't speak out of much experience, so I don't really know what I'm talking about. But the leads on those Xicon wirewound cement resistors, for example, feel really cheap to me.
     

  13. RLee77

    RLee77 Friend of Leo's

    May 15, 2016
    Silicon Valley
    Over a large arc, unsoldered, yes. However, if you tin an end of it, and solder to a turret, and flex that end a small number of times, it will break... more easily than you'd think. The tinning prevents the strands from moving freely.
     
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  14. tubeswell

    tubeswell Friend of Leo's

    Jul 1, 2008
    NZ
    You're in great company on this forum. I call it 'neatness'. Makes for tidy layouts. :)
     
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  15. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

    Aug 8, 2016
    Chattanooga, TN
    Yes, "neatness." That's a good quality!
     
    RLee77 likes this.

  16. Outlaws

    Outlaws Tele-Meister

    157
    Jan 16, 2007
    None
    OCD is also the cause of redoing things that should have been left well enough alone and making a mess. ;). Been there...
     
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  17. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

    Aug 8, 2016
    Chattanooga, TN
    It can be very helpful when people tell me to leave well enough alone. If you think there's something I'm re-doing that doesn't need to be re-done, please let me know. I'm serious!
     

  18. keithb7

    keithb7 Friend of Leo's

    Age:
    46
    Jan 9, 2010
    Western Canada
    Based on the pics, I can't see a need to replace the F&T e-caps. Are you concerned that you cut the leads too short?
     

  19. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

    Aug 8, 2016
    Chattanooga, TN
    Yes, that's the concern. Not on all of them, but on one or two for sure. They're in there, but basically held by the solder.
     

  20. Axis29

    Axis29 Poster Extraordinaire Ad Free Member

    Jan 2, 2007
    Virginia, USA
    That's really all it needs. I agree with @keithb7, no need to replace those caps.
     

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