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New adventures in 5E3

Discussion in 'Shock Brother's DIY Amps' started by theprofessor, Jan 11, 2018.

  1. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

    Aug 8, 2016
    Chattanooga, TN
    Well I've seen him praise your builds a lot, so you're doing a lot of stuff right!

    While you're here, maybe you can weigh in on this, too. @Snfoilhat was asking above about my speaker jack wiring, in which both the ground and sleeve of the extension jack are currently un-wired. It looks like on this detail of your layout that you've got the ground of the extension jack wired back to the switch of the primary speaker jack. Is that correct?
    detail_Sac_DAve_speaker_jacks.png
     

  2. The Guy

    The Guy Tele-Holic

    726
    Sep 15, 2016
    Guitarsphere
    I don't see the heater wire going to pin 9 from v1 and v2 here...?

    Should look something like this:
    image.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2018
    SacDAve likes this.

  3. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

    Aug 8, 2016
    Chattanooga, TN
    Thanks, The Guy. That's right. I forgot to do that. I ran the one from pin 4 to pin 4, but not from pin 9 to pin 9. Then I wondered whether I needed to go back and twist the 9 and 4 wires together, or whether I could just leave the 4 wire separate from the 9 one.
     
    The Guy likes this.

  4. The Guy

    The Guy Tele-Holic

    726
    Sep 15, 2016
    Guitarsphere
    Check the picture i attached above... You want them twisted together nice and tight. Those wires are a huge source of noise.
     

  5. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

    Aug 8, 2016
    Chattanooga, TN
    OK, thanks. I'll go back and put those together, twisted real nice.
     
    The Guy likes this.

  6. SacDAve

    SacDAve Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Age:
    66
    Dec 23, 2009
    Rocklin Ca.
    You don't need a separate ground wire to the extension spk. it grounds to the chassis. On my drawing I have one, my 5E3 grounding pattern goes against what most people think is correct . The ground pattern you have in post 28 is just fine follow that.
     

  7. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

    Aug 8, 2016
    Chattanooga, TN
    OK. Thank you!
     

  8. RLee77

    RLee77 Friend of Leo's

    May 15, 2016
    Silicon Valley
    It's ok, but my practice is to never rely on the chassis as a circuit current path. Steel is not as good/reliable a conductor as copper wire, when it starts to get oxidized especially.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2018

  9. RLee77

    RLee77 Friend of Leo's

    May 15, 2016
    Silicon Valley
    Don't worry about it unless you have issues later on. If you never used alcohol to dissolve flux that ended up on the surface, you should be fine. And the case I mentioned was an odd one, not the norm.
     
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  10. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

    Aug 8, 2016
    Chattanooga, TN
    So if it were your build, would you add a wire from the extension jack's ground to the primary jack's switch?
     

  11. FenderLover

    FenderLover Friend of Leo's

    Jun 11, 2009
    Minnesota
    ^^ I would. That way there is always a connection even if the jack becomes loose and you don't notice right away.
     
    SacDAve, RLee77 and King Fan like this.

  12. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

    Aug 8, 2016
    Chattanooga, TN
    Thanks, @FenderLover . I think I'll add that, as it certainly won't hurt anything.
     

  13. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

    Aug 8, 2016
    Chattanooga, TN
    OK, I think I've got it. Please take a look at everything and see if it seems good. I'll post pictures and make a few comments to point some things out.

    Here's the updated heater wiring between V2 and V1.
    IMG_9943.JPG
    I added a wire from the ground lug of the extension jack (right) to the switch lug of the primary speaker jack (left).
    IMG_9944.JPG

    Here's the wiring, heaters included, of the two 6V6's.
    IMG_9945.JPG

    Two things here I'd like to ask about or confirm:
    (1) You'll see that I ran the 6.3V heaters from the PT to the underside of the pilot light. Should I run them above it instead to get a little more separation from the heaters going from the light to the 6V6s, or does it matter at all?
    (2) I decided not to put a standby switch on this build. I'd like to keep it simple, and the 5Y3 doesn't care. So the OT (red wire, bottom left) in goes directly to pin 8 of the rectifier instead of going over to B+1, then up to the standby switch, then back down to pin 8 of the rectifier. The B+ from the board also goes to pin 8 of the rectifier (other red wire just above it that comes from the board).
    IMG_9946.JPG
     

  14. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

    Aug 8, 2016
    Chattanooga, TN
    A few more.

    The high-voltage from the PT (red) go to pins 3 and 5 instead of 4 and 6, due to the rectifier backup diodes. The 5V heaters (yellow) go to pins 2 and 8 of the rectifier.
    IMG_9947.JPG
    I'd also like to confirm the power wiring.

    (1) My earth ground from the power cord goes all the way around the PT and into the bottom of the chassis. I've crimped and soldered it, and it will get silicone grease underneath and locktight on the nut and machine screw.
    (2) The black primary from the PT goes to the power switch (left lug) and then from the right lug of the same switch underneath and over to the side lug of the fuse. The black from the power cord goes to the tip of the fuse.
    (3) The white from the PT is spliced to the white of the power cord. Since I'm not wiring a standby switch, I decided to use one lug of the "ground" switch to splice these two together. I haven't soldered that yet, and the two white wires will likely be shorter.
    (4) The other hole in the chassis is dedicated to the high-voltage center-tap, together with the negative side of the B+. I'll crimp them together in a ring, solder them, and attach them through the chassis with silicone grease and threadlock on the nut and bolt.
    IMG_9949.JPG
    Here's a more global view of the sockets, etc.
    IMG_9950.JPG

    Here's a more global view of the input jacks, pots, etc. I put in the preamp bus wire, but I've still got to solder the black ground leads to it.
    IMG_9951.JPG

    I'd appreciate any advice, corrections, confirmation you can give. Thanks!
     

  15. SacDAve

    SacDAve Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Age:
    66
    Dec 23, 2009
    Rocklin Ca.
    It looks OK to me. The 3 wires connected to pin 8 on 5Y3 looks confusing but I think the extra wire is because your not using the SB switch ? Looks like the SB switch is just a lug for the neutral on the power?
     

  16. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

    Aug 8, 2016
    Chattanooga, TN
    Thanks very much, @SacDAve . You're correct on both counts. The "standby" switch is simply cosmetic and is being used to connect the neutral wires at one lug, as @clintj suggested at some point. And yes, the OP transformer goes straight to the 5Y3 instead of being routed through the B+ on the board, then to the standby, and then to the 5Y3. That means both B+1 and the OP go straight to the 5Y3 to the same pin.
     

  17. SacDAve

    SacDAve Poster Extraordinaire Silver Supporter

    Age:
    66
    Dec 23, 2009
    Rocklin Ca.

  18. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

    Aug 8, 2016
    Chattanooga, TN
    I'm going to finish up the bits of soldering in the morning then print out the schematic and check every connection. And then, I'll apply the lightning to the circuit... I mean... the electricity!
     
    The Guy and SacDAve like this.

  19. RLee77

    RLee77 Friend of Leo's

    May 15, 2016
    Silicon Valley
    A useful (for me) pre-check is to clip one end of your multimeter to circuit ground, set it to "beep" continuity mode, and then check every ground connection shown on the schematic and verify it, then mark off that line with a highlighter on the schematic. Then all you have left is all the non-grounded connections. I find that grounds are easy to miss when wiring up stuff.
     
    The Guy likes this.

  20. theprofessor

    theprofessor Friend of Leo's

    Aug 8, 2016
    Chattanooga, TN
    Thanks, @RLee77 . For some reason, mine doesn't beep. I need to figure out how to do that. It would be a lot easier than having to look at the multimeter to seek the read-out every time. Anyway, I'll check the grounds carefully.
     

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